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Playlist: Presidents' Day

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/24905220@N00/3202845021/">Ben Templesmith</a>
Image by: Ben Templesmith 
Curated Playlist

Feb. 19 is Presidents' Day.

Check out how we choose the Editors' Picks.

New in 2024

Presidential Essentials 2024

From Charlie Warren | 59:59

The highs and lows of presidential history told through a variety of music, comedy, sounds, and voices from FDR to Biden. Plus eventful remembrances of Washington and Jefferson.

The_white_house_2_small The highs and lows of presidential history told through a variety of music, comedy, sounds, and voices from FDR to Biden.  Plus eventful remembrances of Washington and Jefferson. 

For Presidents' Day Weekend and Washington's Birthday, if celebrated on different days in your state.

Witness the antics of The Capitol Steps, Jay Leno, Dennis Miller, George Carlin, Chevy Chase, and John Toomey. Hear Stan Freberg lampoon George Washington, James Whitmore play Harry Truman, Charlie Warren impersonate Jimmy Carter, and Rich Little play Nixon, Ford, Carter, and Reagan.  Hear Ronald and Nancy Reagan in the movies, the real voices of FDR, Truman, Eisenhhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush 1, Clinton, Obama, Trump, and Biden, plus The Capitol Steps' version of Bush 2, Obama, and Trump.  Epochal music by Dave Brubeck, Fleetwood Mac, Duke Ellington, Kenny G, Burt Bacharach, and more.                                    

55 MIN. VERSION - See information under "Timing & Cues" to shorten the program to :55 minutes

Strange Currency 02.19.24: Presidents' Day Special

From KMUW | Part of the Strange Currency series | 01:53:59

We mark Presidents’ Day with music from Manic Street Preachers, Frank Zappa, Joe Walsh, and Sparks.

Sc_square_small We mark Presidents’ Day with music from Manic Street Preachers, Frank Zappa, Joe Walsh, and Sparks.

Global Village Presidents' Day Special 2.19.24

From KMUW | Part of the Global Village with Chris Heim series | 57:00

SPECIAL: Global Village celebrates Presidents’ Day with music from artists who ran for or won the office of president – including Dizzy Gillespie, Fela, Ruben Blades, and Michel Martelly – plus Les Ambassadeurs (because every president has some), and Brenda Fassie’s tribute to South African President, Nelson Mandela.

Globalvillagelogog3web_small SPECIAL: Global Village celebrates Presidents’ Day with music from artists who ran for or won the office of president – including Dizzy Gillespie, Fela, Ruben Blades, and Michel Martelly – plus Les Ambassadeurs (because every president has some), and Brenda Fassie’s tribute to South African President, Nelson Mandela.


Classic Specials

Nixon in China

From Open Source | Part of the In Search of Monsters: The Rise and Fall of American Empire series | 58:30

A conversation with Chas Freeman about Nixon's historic breakthrough in China.

Screen_shot_2022-02-10_at_5 It was the meeting, just 50 years ago this month, that changed more lives at more levels than anyother political handshake in our lifetimes. The Trickster and the Monster, as the principals had been nicknamed, with some justice: Richard Nixon, the American president who would leave office two years later in Watergate disgrace, and Mao Zedong, the Communist chairman whose fanatical Great Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution had already taken 50 million Chinese lives, maybe more.  Strange to tell, their breakthrough in Beijing—February, 1972—was not about changing China or the US. It was about fending off pressure they both were feeling from Soviet Russia. But it’s the unintended consequences we notice now, the loveless connection that made China the world’s workshop.

This show is the first of a series we’re calling In Search of Monsters: The Rise and Fall of American Empire, in collaboration with the Quincy Institute, nudging all of us to rethink what we’re doing in this 21st century. Time travel with us this hour, back 50 years to the spark that renewed China and began a remapping of the human story. Our guest, Chas Freeman, was there that whole week, between Richard Nixon and China’s Chairman Mao Zedong, interpreting one to the other in Beijing, and noting odd details at a sharp turn of history: Mrs. Nixon’s knockout red coat, for example. Make of it what you will: the Chinese-American novelist Gish Jen calls her new story collection Thank You, Mr. Nixon—specially for that red coat. 

The Highest Office (hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:59

When Colin Rafferty moved to Virginia in 2008 he didn’t know much about the presidents, so he set out to read a biography of each one.

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When Colin Rafferty moved to Virginia in 2008 he didn’t know much about the presidents, so he set out to read a biography of each one. What began as a personal project eventually turned into his new publication - a collection of experimental, genre-bending essays on every U.S. president. Also: In 2016, Eric Drummond Smith guest-curated an art exhibit called The Cherry Bounce Show at the William King Museum in Abingdon, VA. He called on artists from all over Appalachia to create modern artwork, with one small stipulation… every piece had to be inspired by a presidential election.

Later in the show: In grade school, many of us learned how the founding fathers carefully defined the office of the presidency. But Nathaniel Green argues that the presidency was shaped by ordinary people, not the political elite. Plus: Loaded with humor and biting satire, political cartoons have a long history of holding people in power to account. What makes political cartoons so effective? Fran Hassencahl says the answer lies in the magic of visual metaphors.

LBJ and the Great Society

From LBJ and the Great Society | 52:00

Before Vietnam sunk his presidency, LBJ compiled record accomplishments domestically: medicare, civil and voting rights, immigration reform, and public broadcasting. Hosted by Melody Barnes, chief domestic policy advisor to Barack Obama.

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President Lyndon B. Johnson is today remembered largely for his failure in Vietnam. But before the war sunk his presidency, LBJ compiled a record of accomplishment on the domestic front unmatched since FDR.  Medicare, civil and voting rights, clean air and water, Head Start, immigration reform, public broadcasting — fifty years later, these programs are so deeply woven into the fabric of American life that it is difficult to imagine the country without them.  

So how did Lyndon Johnson, who made so ruinous a mess in Vietnam, pull off so extraordinary a feat at home? That’s the question we’ll be exploring through the recorded recollections of those who were there when this history was being made, and who had a hand in its making. Hosted by Melody Barnes, chief domestic policy advisor to Barack Obama and now co-head of the Democracy Initiative at the University of Virginia.

Getting to Know the Presidents (hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:57

Assessing President Trump's first year - Reading and reflecting on the lives of the presidents - Why did the first presidents live so long? - The National Archives' quest to catalogue the presidency - Studying the handwriting of the Founding Fathers

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At the end of President Trump’s first year in office, Bill Antholis and Barbara Perry take a look at how it compares to other presidential first years. And: Writer Colin Rafferty read a biography of every single president—and then wrote his own essays in response to their lives. Plus: The first presidents lived long lives for that era, with most of them living into their 80’s or even 90’s. Rebecca Brannon says that they may have been mistaken in the expectation that they would be given respect after office, based on their longevity and lifetime experiences.
Later in the show: Sue Purdue and Kathleen Williams describe the scope of the remarkable project of the National Archives called Founders Online. Plus: Some of the proofreaders who spent three years immersed in the handwriting of the founding fathers came away with a very intimate understanding of those who shaped our country.

Good Friday, 1865: LINCOLN'S LAST DAY

From Craig Wichman | 58:23

Produced before a live audience at The Museum of Television and Radio (Paley Center for Media) in New York, this original audio docudrama is the recipient of a National Audio Theatre BEST SCRIPT "GRAND PRIZE."

Lincolncrop_small Produced before a live audience at The Museum of Television and Radio (Paley Center for Media) in New York, this original audio docudrama by producer Craig Wichman is the recipient of a National Audio Theatre BEST SCRIPT "GRAND PRIZE." Mr. Wichman plays the 16th President, and Katie Nutt is Mary Todd Lincoln, in a cast that includes John O. Donnell, Emma Palzere, Vito LaBella, Derek Lively, Dan Renkin, Bernadette Fiorella, and John Prave. Directed by Jay Stern (Independent Feature, THE CHANGELING); Music by TONY AWARD-winning Composer Mark Hollmann, with Kathy McDonald and Darren Wilkes; Sound Effects by Sue Zizza and David Shinn (Sue Media); Engineering by Dominick Barbera, with John Kiehl (Soundtrack NY.) And it's all true. ************************************************* "A pleasure... best radio... in some time... subject matter among the most dramatic..." -Arthur Anderson, The Mercury Theatre "A great job... really first rate, just as your last... keep up the wonderful work..." -Leonard Maltin "I suspect that Quicksilver... will be racking up another "Best Production" (Award) for this... splendid radio..." -Max Schmid, WBAI, NY "...Quite fine..." -Andy Trudeau, National Public Radio QUICKSILVER RADIO THEATER has earned awards from the National Federation of Community Broadcasters and the National Audio Theatre, and has performed by invitation at the Museum of Television and Radio (Paley Center for Media) where its shows are in the Collection.

Lincoln and Presidential Campaign Politics

From NPR Illinois | 59:00

A one-hour program drawn from the 2008 Lincoln Legacy Lecture Series, a discussion of the politics during Abraham Lincoln’s presidency relating to the anti-war movement, campaign strategies, and interpretations of the U.S. Constitution.

Legacy_small First, a presentation by Dr. Jennifer Weber, Assistant Professor of History at the University of Kansas-Lawrence and author of Copperheads: The Rise and Fall of Lincoln's Opponents in the North, discussing how President Abraham Lincoln dealt with the Copperheads (the anti-war Democrats) in the elections held during the U.S. Civil war and how Lincoln's leadership qualities were brought to bear to influence dissidents and politics. Then, a presentation by Dr. Silvana Siddali, Associate Professor of History at St. Louis University and author of From Property to Person: Slavery and the Confiscation Acts, 1861-1862, examining how the elections leading up to and during the U.S. Civil War reflected Americans' view of the future of the U.S. Constitution and President Lincoln's power to influence it.

Abraham Lincoln's Portrait (Part 1)

From GW Global Media Institute | Part of the GW Presents Beyond Category series | 57:28

Lincoln scholar Harold Holzer joins host Dick Golden to paint a portrait of America's 16th president through words and the music of Tony Bennett.

Prx_small President Clinton and the United States Congress appointed Harold Holzer, a noted Lincoln expert and author, to be a co-chair of the 2009 Lincoln Bicenntenial Committee.  Mr. Holzer had asked his friend Tony Bennett to paint a portrait of Lincoln for Holzer’s book Why Lincoln Matters.  The painting hangs in Mr. Holzer’s office at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Dick Golden interviewed Mr. Holzer in his office and asked him to select seven of his favorite Tony Bennett recordings and for two hours the conversation was about Abraham Lincoln and Tony Bennett.

Lincoln’s Team of Rivals

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 01:00:13

Famed historian Doris Kearns Goodwin explores the political genius of “Honest Abe.”

Mike_ptr_thumb_small Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Doris Kearns Goodwin wrote definitive books on Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Lyndon Johnson, and the Kennedys. This time around she spent ten years learning about Abraham Lincoln--exploring the personality, ambition, and political genius of the enigmatic leader. Goodwin’s new book, Team of Rivals, is an exhaustive biography of “honest Abe”. On this edition of Prime Time Radio, she joins host Mike Cuthbert for a special hour-long conversation about how Lincoln made allies out of enemies to successfully maneuver the nation through its most trying time--the Civil War.

Story of the Century: Lincoln's Assassination

From GW Global Media Institute | Part of the This Just In! series | 53:31

Go back in time to 1865 and re-live the biggest news event of the 19th Century - Abraham Lincoln's assassination. The Newseum's Patty Rhule takes host Sam Litzinger on a tour through the Manhunt exhibit and explains the roles of the telegraph and photography in capturing this most riveting story. Plus, find out why the ghost of John Wilkes Booth is rumored to call the Newseum home.

Story_of_the_century_small Go back in time to 1865 and re-live the biggest news event of the 19th Century - Abraham Lincoln's assassination.  The Newseum's Patty Rhule takes host Sam Litzinger on a tour through the Manhunt exhibit and explains the roles of the telegraph and photography in capturing this most riveting story.  Plus, find out why the ghost of John Wilkes Booth is rumored to call the Newseum home.

Peace Talks Radio: JFK's Turn Towards Peace (59:00 / 54:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:57

A conversation with James Douglass, author of "JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters". Douglass makes the case for his theory that the 35th President was the victim of a murder conspiracy and that he died largely because of his peacemaking policies. Offered in either 59:00 or 54:00 versions.

Jfk_small In an in-depth conversation, James Douglass, author of "JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters", spells out his theory that the 35th President was the victim of a murder conspiracy and that he died because of his peacemaking policies. He tracks Kennedy's transformation from a hawkish anti-Communist to someone who helped save the world from nuclear war by establishing back-channel conversations with Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev. Listeners will also hear much of Kennedy's 1963 speech at American University during which he laid out his vision for world peace, less than 6 months before his murder. Paul Ingles hosts. Language Advisory: A film clip includes the characters saying "Those god-damn Kennedys...." about 18:20 into Part A. If you feel it offensive to your listeners, you may edit it out or contact the producer for a version with that clip stripped out. paul@paulingles.com.

The Peacemaking Chapters of The Roosevelts

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:49

On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, what you might call an independent spin-off from Ken Burns 2014 documentary on The Roosevelts. We consider Teddy, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt through a peace studies lens. First, some details about the effort that won Teddy Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize, then later we explore the war and peace philosophies of Franklin Roosevelt, and the peace and human rights work of Eleanor Roosevelt. NOTE THAT THERE IS ALSO A 29 MINUTE VERSION OF THIS PROGRAM ON PRX.

Roosevelts_small On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, what you might call an independent spin-off from Ken Burns 2014 documentary on The Roosevelts. We consider Teddy, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt through a peace studies lens.  First, some details about the effort that won Teddy Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize, then later we explore the war and peace philosophies of Franklin Roosevelt, and the peace and human rights work of Eleanor Roosevelt.

Our guests are Charles Doleac, a Portsmouth, New Hampshire attorney and expert on The Portsmouth Peace Treaty of 1905.  Also Dr. Allida Black of the George Washington University in Washington, DC and author or editor of many books on Eleanor Roosevelt.

Lincoln as a Lawmaker

From NPR Illinois | 59:00

Looking at Lincoln’s time as a member of the Illinois legislature.

Img_7219_small This documentary will explore Lincoln's first bid for office, his memorable legislation, his leadership qualities in the legislature and how his days as a member of the General Assembly prepared him for the future. 

Lincoln's Music

From NPR Illinois | 58:57

An exploration of just some of Abraham Lincoln’s favorite music and the music of his lifetime.

Happylincolnday_small We’ll explore the music Lincoln loved along with the music he heard throughout his life stretching from childhood … through presidency … and ultimately assassination. We’ll hear some of the musical anecdotes that have been passed down through the years. And we’ll also find out more about period instruments and the origins of mid-nineteenth century popular songs.

Guests include: Chris Vallillo, Erwin Thompson and Todd Cranson.

Barack Obama-The Remix

From Peter Bochan | Part of the Shortcuts series | 54:17

The 2008 journey to the White House, re-mixed in words & music -- introduced by Robert F. Kennedy and featuring Bill Cosby, Oprah Winfrey, John McCain, Chris Rock, Colin Powell, George W. Bush, Sarah Palin, Steve Harvey, Will. i. am, Hillary Clinton, The Pointer Sisters, The Drifters, John Legend, Homer Simpson, Moby, Bruce Springsteen, Ted Kennedy, FDR, and more.

Obamacookie_small Barack Obama - The journey to the White House, reMixed in words & music-introduced by Robert F. Kennedy and featuring Bill Cosby, Oprah Winfrey, John McCain, Chris Rock, Colin Powell, George W. Bush, Sarah Palin, Steve Harvey, Will. i. am, Hillary Clinton, The Pointer Sisters, The Drifters, John Legend, Homer Simpson, Moby, Bruce Springsteen, Ted Kennedy, FDR, The Little Rascals, Kevin So, Branford Marsalis, M.C. Yogi, Martin Luther King Jr, Sam Cooke, John Lewis, Quiet Village, David Letterman, Tim Russert. Katie Couric, Charles Gibson, Matt Damon, Roy Budd, Iron & Wine, Dephazz, Curtis Mayfield & The Impressions, The Edwin Hawkins Singers, various politicians, excited voters...and Barack Obama.

Yes We Can!


Half-Hour (24:00-30:00)

Starter Kit: Executive Branch

From New Hampshire Public Radio | Part of the Civics 101 series | 21:22

From President to Postal Worker.

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In this episode of our Starter Kit series, a primer on the powers of the President, both constitutional and extra-constitutional. Also, a super inefficient mnemonic device to remember the 15 executive departments in the order of their creation.

Featuring the voices of Lisa Manheim, professor at UW School of Law and co-author of The Limits of Presidential Power, and Kathryn DePalo, professor at Florida International University and past president of the Florida Political Science Association. 

How to Run for President

From New Hampshire Public Radio | Part of the Civics 101 series | 31:46

Almost anyone can do it... but what does it actually take?

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The job description is pretty sparse, the laws are convoluted and the path from A to Z seems fraught with peril. So how does a person go from candidate to nominee to Leader of the Free World? We asked some heavy hitters for the inside scoop on running for President. 

Settle in for a long and strange ride with Former Governor and Democratic nominee for President, Michael Dukakis, CNN political analyst Bakari Sellers and founding partner of Purple Strategies, Mark Squier.

Impeachment

From New Hampshire Public Radio | Part of the Civics 101 series | 19:25

The history, the process, and some fancy robes.

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We have never actually fired the President of the United States. But we sure have tried. It’s the biggest job in the country, so the road to termination is a long and fraught. What happens after Congress initiates the process?

What is impeachment? How does the process play out?

Our brilliant friends Linda Monk (the Constitution Lady), Frank Bowman (author of High Crimes and Misdemeanors) and Dan Cassino (Political Science Professor at Fairleigh Dickinson University) are our guides to the Big Show.

Lincoln and Humor

From NPR Illinois | 29:00

How Abraham Lincoln discovered humor and how jokes and tall tales helped him to make a point.

Abewithguitar_small Interviews with two Lincoln experts on how Abraham Lincoln discovered how he could use tall tales and jokes to make a point. And he used the technique… not only in political debates… but also in the courtroom. And Lincoln gathered jokes and stories and re-worked them or embellished the details to fit to situation at hand. Paul Zall wrote a book… “Abe Lincoln Laughing”… which is a compilation of several stories and jokes and sources for them. The other expert… James Cornelius is curator of the Lincoln Collection at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum. The program also includes a short interview with a Lincoln impersonator… Richard “Fritz” Klein… who talks about his 30 years experience in playing Lincoln. Klein also tells a handful of jokes/stories to set the tone of the program.

The Roosevelts Through a Peace Studies Lens

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:01

On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, what you might call an independent spin-off from Ken Burns 2014 documentary on The Roosevelts. We consider Teddy, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt through a peace studies lens. First, some details about the effort that won Teddy Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize, then later we explore the war and peace philosophies of Franklin Roosevelt, and the peace and human rights work of Eleanor Roosevelt. NOTE THAT THERE IS ALSO A 59/54 MINUTE VERSION OF THIS ONE PRX.

Teddy_small On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, what you might call an independent spin-off from Ken Burns 2014 documentary on The Roosevelts. We consider Teddy, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt through a peace studies lens.  First, some details about the effort that won Teddy Roosevelt the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize, then later we explore the war and peace philosophies of Franklin Roosevelt, and the peace and human rights work of Eleanor Roosevelt.

Our guests are Charles Doleac, a Portsmouth, New Hampshire attorney and expert on The Portsmouth Peace Treaty of 1905.  Also Dr. Allida Black of the George Washington University in Washington, DC and author or editor of many books on Eleanor Roosevelt.

JFK's Turn Towards Peace (Peace Talks Radio) [29:00]

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | 29:01

A conversation with James Douglass, author of "JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters". Douglass makes the case for his theory that the 35th President was the victim of a murder conspiracy and that he died largely because of his peacemaking policies. JFK's "Peace Speech" just months before his assassination is featured.

Jfk_medium_small In an in-depth conversation, James Douglass, author of "JFK and the Unspeakable: Why He Died and Why It Matters", spells out his theory that the 35th President was the victim of a murder conspiracy and that he died because of his peacemaking policies. He tracks Kennedy's transformation from a hawkish anti-Communist to someone who helped save the world from nuclear war by establishing back-channel conversations with Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev. Listeners will also hear much of Kennedy's 1963 speech at American University during which he laid out his vision for world peace, less than 6 months before his murder. Paul Ingles hosts.


Cutaways (5:00-8:59)

"Lady Bird Johnson: Legacy of a First Lady" Module #1

From Joe Bevilacqua | Part of the "Lady Bird Johnson: Legacy of a First Lady" Modules series | 05:31

Joe Bevilacqua is releasing short module versions of taken from his award winning documentary. The modules combine never-before-released archive audio, gleaned from thousands of hours of recordings housed at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum, period news broadcasts, private conversations with Lyndon Baines Johnson, and the words of Lady Bird Johnson from an interview that has never before been released to the public. Check out the whole series

Mediumladybirdpainting_small The 2008 Presidential election marks the first time a woman, Hillary Clinton is being seriously considered. Lady Bird Johnson was a pioneer First Lady who forged the way for this historic election. With this in mind, Joe Bevilacqua is releasing short module versions of taken from his award winning documentary. The first details Mrs. Johnson's early years. The modules combine never-before-released archive audio, gleaned from thousands of hours of recordings housed at the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum, period news broadcasts, private conversations with Lyndon Baines Johnson, and the words of Lady Bird Johnson from an interview that has never before been released to the public. If you would like to air the full one hour documentary, go to: http://www.prx.org/pieces/364 Bevilacqua spent nearly five months listening to the rare tapes and traveled to Washington, D.C. to interview Mrs. Johnson's colleagues and friends. The program features Lyndon Johnson Administration staffers Liz Carpenter, Bess Abell, and Nash Castro, Washington Post owner Katherine Graham, Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum Director Harry Middleton, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center Director Robert Glass Breunig; Lady Bird biographer Jan Jarboe Russell, and First Ladies Betty Ford and Barbara Bush. Other voices heard on the program include Kirk Douglas and Helen Hayes reading from LBJ and Lady Bird's love letters. The production was produced in association with KUT Radio in Austin, TX, and overseen by a panel of scholars and experts including Lewis Gould, retired University of Texas at Austin Professor of History; Walt Rostow, UT Professor Emeritus, Elspeth Rostow, former dean of the UT LBJ School of Public Affairs; Carl Anthony, Washington, D.C. historian; and Don Carleton, director, The Center for American History at UT. ***** Informational, Inspiring This is an excellent, uplifting journey through Lady Bird Johnson's life, and her growth and transition to first lady under tragic conditions. It's wonderful to hear her voice, rendered here in excerpts from interviews she's given and speeches she's made. It is especially poignant to hear a portion of her first audio diary entry, made the day after JFK's assassination. Nuanced choices of music are a production plus, but the strength is in the spoken word. Wisely chosen excerpts create a rich experience. The hour contains a wide range of voices, from historians to those who worked with her or know her, and they pinpoint her influence on LBJ, and on the capital, and the nation -- particularly in the areas of environment, race, and education. She truly is a force for good. (Reviewer) (Editorial Board) Transom Editors , Atlantic Public Media December 4, 2003

Art In Camelot (Series)

Produced by ARTSEDGE

A two-part series for the anniversary of the swearing-in of John F. Kennedy, looking at the incredible impact the Kennedy administration had on the arts.

Most recent piece in this series:

Drop-Ins (2:00-4:59)

Electoral College

From New Hampshire Public Radio | Part of the Civics 101 series | 19:11

The intentional barrier between the people and who they want to be President.

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When we vote for a president, we're not really voting for a president.

Today in our episode on the Electoral College, we explore the rationale of the framers in creating it, its workings, its celebrations, its critiques, and its potential future.

This episode features the voices of Northwestern Professor of political science Alvin Tillery, University of Texas Professor of political science Rebecca Deen, and former 'faithless elector' Christopher Suprun.