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Playlist: Holiday and New Year's Spoken Word 2021

Compiled By: PRX Editors

Caption: PRX default Playlist image
Curated Playlist

More to come!

Christmas At Home with Hanif Abdurraqib

From work x work | 52:00

Join host Hanif Abdurraqib for a special episode of Object of Sound from PRX and Sonos taking a deep dive into the world of Christmas Music.

Whether you’re flooded with excitement and warm nostalgia at the first beat of ‘Jingle Bells,’ or desperately counting down the days until January, Christmas music is everywhere. From the tackiest tracks to the most moving melodies, join us to explore the soundtrack of the season.

We’ll hear from Song Exploder’s Hrishikesh Hirway and a special guest artist, as well as listeners from across the country who’ve called in to share their non-traditional Christmas traditions.

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Join host Hanif Abdurraqib for a special episode of Object of Sound, from PRX and Sonos, taking a deep dive into the world of Christmas music.

Whether you’re flooded with excitement and warm nostalgia at the first beat of ‘Jingle Bells,’ or desperately counting down the days until January, Christmas music is everywhere. From the tackiest tracks to the most moving melodies, join us to explore the soundtrack of the season.

We’ll hear from special guests: musical duo She & Him, plus Song Exploder’s Hrishikesh Hirway. We'll also hear from listeners across the country who’ve called in to share their non-traditional Christmas traditions.

A Season's Griot 2021

From WHQR | 59:00

One-hour Kwanzaa celebration in story and song

Default-piece-image-2 A Season's Griot is public radio's only nationally syndicated Kwanzaa program.  Hosted for 25 years by acclaimed storyteller Madafo Lloyd Wilson, this annual one-hour special captures the tales and traditions of African American and African peoples. The show’s poet laureate, Beverly Fields Burnette, and other members of the Season’s Griot family return with familiar and favorite elements of Griot. 

Wildly Magical: Stories of Animal Encounters

From Living On Earth | Part of the Holiday Specials series | 59:00

Free to non-carrying stations: From one woman’s dream of swimming with marine iguanas, to uncommon encounters with common rabbits, to a Native American tale of how the dog came to be our loyal companion, and much more, this Living on Earth holiday storytelling special features stories of how other species on this Earth touch human lives. “Wildly Magical: Stories of Animal Encounters”, a storytelling special from PRX. Available for broadcast anytime between Thanksgiving and New Year's.

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Living on Earth 2021 Animal Storytelling Special Hour Rundown

***Free to non-carrying stations. Half Hour version available as well***

SEGMENT A (13:00)
1.) CARE FOR THE COMMON CRITTER: As a wildlife rehabilitator, Julie Zickefoose has had some remarkable encounters with animals. She joins Host Bobby Bascomb to share some of her own stories and animal insights as well as tales of uncommon encounters others have had while helping common woodchucks and rabbits in need. (12:25)
Segment A ends @ 19:29 with announcer OC:  ...Sailors for the Sea dot org. 
@ 19:30 music bed (0:59)
SEGMENT B (19:30)
1.) ‘IT COULD BE THE LAST ONE’: STORIES OF PEOPLE HELPING RARE CRITTERS: As an endangered species advocate, Tierra Curry gets calls and emails from strangers across the country who think they might have found the very last plant or animal of a particular rare species. She shares some of the most humorous and heartwarming stories with Host Jenni Doering, as well as a story about her own breathtaking encounter with a wolf in an Alaskan snowstorm. (8:45)
2.) WILDLY MAGICAL: ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS IN THE GALAPAGOS: Writer Jennifer Junghans had always dreamed of going to the Galapagos to swim with the marine iguanas. In 2017 she finally had her chance, and although the iguanas stayed high and dry, the experience brought her up close with blue-footed boobies and blacktip sharks, and face-to-face with a curious pufferfish. Jennifer shares her story of visiting “the remote wilderness of her dreams” with Host Aynsley O’Neill, who spent a memorable summer studying in the Galapagos. (10:10)
Segment B ends @ 39:59 with announcer OC: .... aerospace, building industries, and food refrigeration. 
@ 40:00 music bed (0:59) 
SEGMENT C (18:00)
1.) NATIVE AMERICAN STORIES OF HUMAN AND ANIMAL KINSHIP: Many Native American communities belong to a clan which identifies with an animal, like the bear, deer, or loon, and they are featured in their stories. Storyteller and musician Joe Bruchac of the Nulhegan Abenaki tribe joins Host Bobby Bascomb to share flute music and stories of how the dog came to be a loyal human companion, as well as lessons from a mother bear. (15:10)
Program ends @ 59:00 with network ID. OC: … PRX.
PROMO FOR THIS PROGRAM: 
From one woman’s dream of swimming with marine iguanas, to uncommon encounters with common rabbits, to a Native American tale of how the dog came to be our loyal companion, and much more, this Living on Earth holiday storytelling special features stories of how other species on this Earth touch human lives. “Wildly Magical: Stories of Animal Encounters”, a storytelling special from PRX.
(Local date and tag line here)

The Importance of Rituals

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the 2021 Holiday Specials from CBC Radio series | 54:00

A one hour special on the meaning of rituals, and the power they hold. A conversation with author Sasha Sagan (daughter of the late astronomer Carl Sagan).

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CBC Radio’s “Tapestry” presents a one hour special on the meaning of rituals, and the power they hold. 

Sasha Sagan, whose mother is writer Ann Druyan and father is the late astronomer Carl Sagan, grew up in a secular household. But that didn't mean rituals weren't important. She explores the idea in her book For Small Creatures Such as We: Rituals for Finding Meaning in Our Unlikely World.”

She recalls a cab driver telling her and her husband, then newlyweds, to sing the alphabet — and to do it weekly. Now, her family does it every Saturday, and she says it's these kinds of traditions or rituals that help people find meaning and beauty, even if it isn't part of a faith.   

"There's a lot of different people who are doing these like funny, quirky things together and maybe not always seeing them as rituals," said Sagan. 

"But they are a way of connecting you to what is, you know, meaningful and deep and beautiful to you."

Host: Mary Hynes


The Cook-Off

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the 2021 Holiday Specials from CBC Radio series | 54:00

CBC Radio's "The Doc Project" presents a heart-warming documentary about food, family and giving back.

The_doc_project_small At the start of the pandemic, the entire Hamadi family found themselves living together under the same roof for the first time... in a long time. The three adult siblings - Adonis, Rima and Rami - hunkered down with their parents, keeping themselves entertained watching movies and pulling pranks. One day, after watching a cooking competition on TV, they decided to try their own cook-off. But what was intended as just another way to pass the time ended up helping the Hamadis, and hundreds of others, make a difference in ways they never could have imagined. 

Robert Munsch, author of The Paper Bag Princess, on his life in stories

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the 2021 Holiday Specials from CBC Radio series | 25:06

A rare and touching interview with American-Canadian children's author Robert Munsch. (The Paper Bag Princess, Love You Forever) The iconic storyteller reflects on his career and reveals he has dementia. Since publishing his first story over 40 years ago, the writer has sold more than 80 million copies of his books in North America alone. In October 2021, The Paper Bag Princess, was optioned as a film by Universal Pictures with Elizabeth Banks set to direct.
Host: Shelagh Rogers

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CBC Radio's "The Next Chapter" presents a rare and touching interview with American-Canadian children's author Robert Munsch. (The Paper Bag Princess, Love You Forever) The iconic storyteller reflects on his career as he reveals he has dementia. Since publishing his first story over 40 years ago, the writer has sold more than 80 million copies of his books in North America alone. 

In 2021 Munsch released two new books,  I Can Fix It! and Think Big!  In his interview with host Shelagh Rogers, he shares some difficult news that he hasn't talked about publicly before.

"I have ongoing dementia," said Munsch, 76.

"I can't drive, I can't ride a bicycle, I can't write. So it's been really whittling away on who I thought I was. I kind of thought I would like to do this interview as a last hurrah."

Munsch was famous for dropping into schools and reading stories to classes. But those visits have had to stop. The stories remain within him.

"My stories, strangely enough, are all there. The stories will be the last thing to go, I think."

Munsch grew up in a household of stories. The fourth of nine children in a Pittsburgh family, Munsch describes himself as a "noisy" kid who didn't do well in school and often got into trouble.

Munsch studied to be a Jesuit priest, but after spending time in an orphanage, he realized how much he loved working with children. He left the priesthood, met and married his wife Ann Beeler and started working with her in daycare centres.

It was in Coos Bay, Ore., in 1973 that Munsch developed the early versions of The Paper Bag Princess. He'd make up stories and tell them to the kids at nap time.

"The [kids] kept asking for dragon stories, so I had a whole bunch of dragon stories. But they were all about the prince saving the princess," said Munsch.

"Ann came to me once and said, 'Look, here we are in Coos Bay. There's a recession. Half the women in that daycare centre have no husbands. There are no princes. Change the story.'"

In the book, published seven years later, Princess Elizabeth outwits the dragon to save her betrothed Prince Ronald. When Ronald complains about her sooty appearance and paper bag dress, Elizabeth famously responds, "You look like a real prince, but you are a bum." She dances off into the sunset alone and "they don't get married after all."

The Paper Bag Princess, illustrated by Munsch's longtime collaborator Michael Martchenko, has sold seven million copies worldwide. In October 2021, the book was optioned as a film by Universal Pictures with Elizabeth Banks set to direct. 

Many of Munsch's books were more down-to-earth than the The Paper Bag Princess. They tell stories of kids with amazing ponytails (Stephanie's Ponytail), kids whose older brothers ruin their favourite stuff (I Can Fix It!) and kids who really have to pee (I Have to Go!).

"A kid at school once said [to me], 'Mr. Munsch, You're a kid,'" said Munsch. 

"My stories have no adult morals. They're not to improve children. They're just for kids to like."

Munsch estimates that about a third of his stories are inspired by kids who write to him and the rest come from meeting kids and telling stories in person. He always names his characters after the kids who inspire the stories.

If there's one thing Munsch hopes his readers take away, it's this very simple message:

"Ordinary people fight a lot and still get along together. Adults and kids fight a lot and still get along together," he said.

"Kids, love your parents and parents, love your kids. It's a complicated world and try to make the best of it."