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Playlist: YOUTH

Compiled By: Erika McGinty

         Cat wants in the cradle! Credit:
Cat wants in the cradle!

Children and older minors are pervasively trapped in unequipped schools, anti-social housing, and unjust detention, particularly children of color

poverty, ill health, addiction, arbitrary violence, and police harassment can lead to "learned helplessness"

but children are resilient as well as vulnerable - these pieces illustrate determination, bravery, and redemption.

Inside and Out

From WBEZ | 53:58

When we run out of ways to deal with a troubled child, often that child ends up in prison. In Illinois, thousands are incarcerated every year. We introduce kids struggling to stay out of trouble, find out what juvenile justice looks like to law enforcement, and what brain science has to say about kids and crime.

Playing
Inside and Out
From
WBEZ

Inside_and_out_special_small When we run out of ways to deal with a troubled child, often that child ends up in prison. In Illinois, thousands are incarcerated every year. Those prisons have been sealed off from the outside world, and also from outside scrutiny. WBEZ’s project on juvenile justice, “Inside and Out,” took an unprecedented look at who the kids are who end up in prison, what happens to them there, and what happens when they get out.

We introduce kids struggling to stay out of trouble, find out what juvenile justice looks like to law enforcement, and what brain science has to say about kids and crime. The stories are relevant to any place where children and the justice system intersect.

More at http://insideandout.chicagopublicradio.org/

Matthew and the Judge: Juvenile Court Diary

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Prison Diaries series | 17:46

Radio Diaries gave both Judge Jeremiah, a Rhode Island juvenile court judge, and Matthew, a 16-year-old repeat offender, tape recorders in 2001. Judge Jeremiah released Matthew early, for good behavior. Two weeks later, Matthew was arrested again for selling drugs. Through their diaries, Matthew and the judge tell the same story from two different sides of the bench.

Jeremiah_small In 2001, Radio Diaries gave both Judge Jeremiah, a Rhode Island juvenile court judge, and Matthew, a 16-year-old repeat offender, tape recorders. Judge Jeremiah released Matthew early, for good behavior. Two weeks later, Matthew was arrested again for selling drugs. Through their diaries, Matthew and the judge tell the same story from two different sides of the bench. 

A year and a half after this story aired, our friend and diarist 18-year-old Matthew Omisore was killed. 

#BlackGirlsMatter: The Criminalization of Black Girls

From Youth Express | 04:55

Challenges faced by African American boys in America are significant and rightfully in the news. But what about those faced by girls? Teen reporters Amma and Marna talk with experts about why more and more black girls are being suspended, institutionalized or incarcerated without consideration of underlying behavioral norms or trauma.

Slb_yelogo_color_small Challenges faced by African American boys in America are significant and rightfully in the news. But what about those faced by girls? Teen reporters Amma and Marna interview Leigh Loman (Education Law Center, Pittsburgh), Ashley Sawyer (Education Law Center, Philadelphia), Maheen Kaleem (Human Rights Project for Girls) and Linda Lane, Ed. D. (Superintendent, Pittsburgh Public Schools) on why many black girls are suspended, institutionalized or incarcerated without consideration of underlying behavioral norms or trauma.

Author of UN violence study advocates child rights at criminal justice conference

From UNICEF | 03:50

This Story is free! Broadcasters can use this content as is or edited down to show how the intellectual and international NGo communities are conceiving of the problem of violence against children.

Default-piece-image-0 Professor Paulo Sergio Pinheiro, the Independent Expert behind the UN Secretary-General's Study on Violence against Children and a world-renowned advocate of child rights, attended the 16th Session of the UN Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice this week in Vienna, Austria. In an interview with the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, Mr. Pinheiro outlined several ways in which violence against children and crime intersect. On the subject of Internet-based child abuse and child pornography, for example, he emphasized that legal protection for children has not grown to match the rapid growth of the web. "Most important is to deal with the children [exploited by web-based abuse] as victims and handle their recovery," he said. "We need to be much more careful than we are." Mr. Pinheiro also cited a crucial link between child protection and justice in the handling of crimes such as trafficking and prostitution. "In many countries, children involved in prostitution are criminalized and even punished because they are involved in something illicit. This is unacceptable," he asserted. We must make sure not to indict the victims. This would be the worst thing that could happen." Indeed, many marginal activities associated with children and youth - such as street begging and loitering in gangs - are criminalized, and Mr. Pinheiro believes this is a mistake. In most cases, he said, there are adults behind these activities, and the children are being victimized by those adults. "If you take, for instance, the gangs in Central America, most of the homicides and heinous crimes are not being committed by adolescents, but are being committed by adults," he pointed out. "In Brazil, in my own country, I would say that 95 per cent or more of the homicides are committed by adults. "Thus you don't have to criminalize every organization of youth, which is precisely what happens," added Mr. Pinheiro. "You just detain every child or adolescent with tattoos, even if you don't have any indication that they committed crimes." For Mr. Pinheiro, the bottom line is that the victimization of children globally is a much larger problem than crime among children, and this must be the starting point for any discussion of this issue. "The number of children as victims is far greater than the number of children as perpetrators," he said. "The problem is that you have the perception of children and adolescents as responsible for the high rates of homicides. This doesn?t correspond to reality, but adolescents are the new scapegoats of the 21st century." The 16th Session of the UN Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice took place all this week, with meetings concluding today.

School Security

From Radio Rootz | 11:18

Every single one of the over 2000 students have to pass through metal detectors each morning.

Default-piece-image-2 Brooklyn Theatre Arts High School takes up a whole city block in Canarsie, Brooklyn. Every single one of the over 2000 students have to pass through metal detectors each morning. A lot of students feel upset about the security system, and how we get treated by the security guards. The Rootz Crew at BTAHS decided to explore this issue of scanning and police in school. We spent several months working on this piece, starting with reading news articles about school violence and policing, then interviewing, listening to our tapes, and deciding on our audience and goal of the story. We hope you like it - check it out!

Room To Breathe: From Chaos to Peace in the Classroom

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

At overcrowded and underfunded public schools across the country high suspension rates are exacerbating existing achievement gaps. Often, chaos in the classroom is to blame, keeping students from concentrating on their classes. On this edition we’ll hear excerpts from Russell Long’s film “Room to Breathe” which takes us to a middle school in San Francisco, California, that began teaching mindfulness in the hopes of giving students the skills they need to focus on learning.

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At overcrowded and underfunded public schools across the country high suspension rates are exacerbating existing achievement gaps. Often, chaos in the classroom is to blame, keeping students from concentrating on their classes. On this edition we’ll hear excerpts from Russell Long’s film “Room to Breathe” which takes us to a middle school in San Francisco, California, that began teaching mindfulness in the hopes of giving students the skills they need to focus on learning. 

Early Intervention to Reduce Dating and Domestic Violence (Peace Talks Radio) [59:00 / 54:00]

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:59

In an effort to stem the tide of dating violence and domestic violence, a school-based intervention program is being tried in Canada and a few U.S. schools. Called "The Fourth R" it introduces relationship training along side the traditional school subjects.

Index_relationships_r_small PEACE TALKS RADIO host Paul Ingles tells the story of losing a friend to a
domestic homicide and wanting to explore efforts to help young people learn
the building blocks for experiencing healthy relationships as adults.
Researchers say those who turn into stalkers and jealous, violent lovers
often experience abuse as children and have limited positive role models for
good relationships.  Paul talks with two people involved in developing
programs for schools that help youngsters learn how relationship conflict
can be handled and how relationship breakups can be managed and survived
without turning to violence.  David Wolfe co-developed a program called "The
Fourth R" in which "Relationship" joins the traditional "reading, 'riting,
and 'rithmetic" in middle and high school training.  Alexandra Smith
oversees a program called "Start Strong Bronx" in New York that makes use of
"The Fourth R" curriculum in middle schools.

Remorse: The 14 Stories of Eric Morse

From Sound Portraits | 40:14

LeAlan Jones and Lloyd Newman's exploration of the murder of Eric Morse, a five-year-old who was pushed to his death from a 14th-floor window by two other boys.

Remorse_small Remorse, which premiered March 21, 1996, on All Things Considered, explores the death of Eric Morse, a five-year-old thrown from the fourteenth floor window of a Chicago housing project by two other boys, ten and eleven years old, in October, 1994. The documentary was reported by LeAlan Jones and Lloyd Newman -- both residents of the Ida B. Wells housing development, where the crime took place, and both sixteen years old. Remorse marks the return of Jones and Newman to NPR's airwaves. In March of 1993, at age fourteen, they collaborated with producer David Isay for the radio documentary Ghetto Life 101, an audio diary of young people growing up on Chicago's South Side. When Eric Morse fell to his death in 1994, LeAlan and Lloyd felt compelled to pick up their tape recorders once again. They spent a year reporting the case and interviewed everyone from Eric's mother, Toni Morse, in the only interview she's granted to the press, to Vince Lane, chairman of the Chicago Housing Authority, to the father of one of the assailants. They set out to learn about the story from the inside, to see how a tragedy like this can touch a community, and to bring to light the scars it left behind. Remorse won the Grand Prize Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award and a Peabody Award in 1995.

BULLIED: Teen Stories from Generation PRX

From WNPR Connecticut | 53:00

Bullying isn’t a new story, but lately, it is all over the news. And while young people are often the targets and the actors in bullying, we rarely get to hear their perspectives in the media. Learn more: generation.prx.org/bullied

Bullied-logo_small

Bullying isn’t a new story, but lately, it is all over the news. And while young people are often the targets and the actors in bullying, we rarely get to hear their perspectives in the media.

Bullied: Teen Stories from Generation PRX is changing that. This hour-long special produced in collaboration with WNPR includes stories from teens with first-hand insight on bullying. From being called "Osama" in a Boston classroom, to looking at whether bullying prevention programs really work in Anchorage, youth producers from around the globe help show us what we don’t we understand – but need to – about bullying. Join teen hosts Council Brandon and Peython Echelson-Russell for an hour of thought-provoking stories, interviews and teen perspectives on bullying.

Bullied: Teen Stories from Generation PRX includes contributions from Blunt Youth Radio Project, ZUMIX Radio, Alaska Teen Media Institute, Hear in the City, Middletown Youth Radio Project and LatitudeNews.com.  It is supported by a grant from the Motorola Mobility Foundation. The show was produced by WNPR, Connecticut Public Radio and presented by PRX, the Public Radio Exchange. Learn more at generation.prx.org/bullied

Portrait of the Bully as a Young Man

From Blunt Youth Radio Project | 09:34

Jeff's reputation as a bully was something of a legend in the coastal town where he grew up. Eight years later, and with a chance to start over again, Jeff knows why he bullied...and why he might not stop.

Img_9595_small Jeff's reputation as a bully was something of a legend in the coastal town where he grew up.  Eight years later, and with a chance to start over again, Jeff knows why he bullied...and why it might still work for him.  Can you grow out of bullying?  And what would it take for bullying to seem less useful in the first place?

This piece was produced by Jones Franzel with funding from a Transom Donor Grant.  It is presented by Blunt Youth Radio's Incarcerated Youth Speak Out Project.

Oakland Scenes: Snapshots of a Community

From Youth Radio | 05:45

Youth Radio chronicles life in Oakland, California, where an alarming number of youth homicides has weighed heavily on the community.

Default-piece-image-0 Youth Radio chronicles life in Oakland, California, where an alarming number of youth homicides has weighed heavily on the community. The story uses as its centerpiece a poem by Ise Lyfe -- a retelling of Romeo and Juliet. The killings have been a major topic of conversation in Oakland among youth, from young poets, to teens gathered on the sidewalk, to kids taking the bus home from school. A high percentage of the victims are youth, sometimes as many as three in a single week. Youth Radio documents the words of young residents in street corner conversations in East Oakland, the neighborhood where much of the violence has taken place. The voices are Youth Radio's Gerald Ward II, Bianca Yarborough, her mom Bridget Taylor, and poet Ise Lyfe.

Adolescent Recovery - Part I

From SQRadio | Part of the Adolescent Recovery - It Takes A Community series | 29:03

There is a national substance abuse epidemic and teens are especially vulnerable. In Part I, SQRadio profiles recovering teen addicts and "recovery schools."

Img_2782-1_small There is a national substance abuse epidemic and teens are especially vulnerable. In Part I, SQRadio profiles recovering teen addicts and "recovery schools."

Adolescent Recovery - Part II

From SQRadio | Part of the Adolescent Recovery - It Takes A Community series | 30:18

Prescription pain medication abuse and overdose deaths among adults and youth are rapidly rising across the United States. In Part II, SQ profiles teen addicts, two Utah physicians who are trying to change the medical prescription drug system in order to save lives, and new teen recovery strategies.

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Most drug overdoses in the past were due to illegal narcotics. Prescription painkillers have now surpassed heroin and cocaine as the leading cause of fatal overdoses.  The number of overdose deaths from opioid painkillers  opium-like drugs that include morphine, codeine, and oxycontin  more than tripled from 1999 to 2006, to 13,800 deaths that year, according to CDC (Centers for Disease Control statistics). 
Teenage substance abuse disorders are on the rise.  Just over 2 million youth in the U.S. ages 12-17 have a substance use disorder, meaning dependence on or abuse of alcohol or drugs.  Tune in for part II of our series, where we hear personal stories from physicians and youth who were affected by this epidemic.

Frankie's Diary, Part 1: Welcome Home, Dad

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Teenage Diaries series | 12:10

Frankie always thought his family was pretty normal until the day the FBI showed up. His dad had been hiding from the law for 15 years, and Frankie had no idea.

“I was coming home from school. I got off the school bus. My Dad and Mom were in the kitchen fixing a waffle iron. And about 10 minutes after I got off the bus, all these cops pulled in our yard. And my Dad looked out the window and he looked at our family in the kitchen.

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series produced by Radio Diaries for NPR.

Td_frankie_002_l_small

Frankie always thought his family was pretty normal until the day the FBI showed up. His dad had been hiding from the law for 15 years, and Frankie had no idea.

“I was coming home from school. I got off the school bus. My Dad and Mom were in the kitchen fixing a waffle iron. And about 10 minutes after I got off the bus, all these cops pulled in our yard. And my Dad looked out the window and he looked at our family in the kitchen. 

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series produced by Radio Diaries for NPR. Since 1996, Executive Producer Joe Richman has been giving tape recorders to young people around the country to document their lives. In December of 2012, Radio Diaries will revisit five of the original diarists 16 years after their first recordings. The series airs on NPR’s All Things Considered

Teenage Diaries Revisited: Frankie

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Teenage Diaries Revisited series | 30:26

As a teenager, Frankie was a high school football star whose picture was in his hometown newspaper every week. Years after graduating, Frankie was back in the paper—when he was arrested for drug related crimes. In his new diary, Frankie tells his story of crystal meth addiction and takes his recorder along while he attempts to repair his relationship with his family. With a baby on the way, Frankie is hoping for a second chance.

Frankie_thumbnail_small As a teenager, Frankie was a high school football star whose picture was in his hometown newspaper every week. Years after graduating, Frankie was back in the paper—when he was arrested for drug related crimes. In his new diary, Frankie tells his story of crystal meth addiction and takes his recorder along while he attempts to repair his relationship with his family. With a baby on the way, Frankie is hoping for a second chance. This is part of the Teenage Diaries Revisited series, in which we followed up with five of the original Teenage Diarists 16 years after their stories aired on NPR. Frankie's Teenage Diary is also available on PRX: http://www.prx.org/pieces/86560-frankie-s-diary-part-1-welcome-home-dad

Juan's Diary, Part 1: Looking at the Rio Grande

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Teenage Diaries series | 24:32

Juan crossed the Rio Grande illegally into Texas four years before he first recorded with Radio Diaries. At the time of his original diary, Juan and his family lived in a poor community just this side of the US-Mexican border.

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series produced by Radio Diaries for NPR.

*Podcast with Juan's Teenage Diary also included.

Juan_small Juan and his family crossed the Rio Grande illegally into Texas four years ago. Now they live in a poor community just this side of the US-Mexican border.

This story is part of the  Teenage Diaries series  produced by Radio Diaries for NPR. Since 1996, Executive Producer Joe Richman has been giving tape recorders to young people around the country to document their lives. In December of 2012, Radio Diaries will revisit five of the original diarists 16 years after their first recordings. The series airs on NPR’s  All Things Considered    

Juan's Diary, Part 2: Back to Mexico

From Radio Diaries | Part of the Teenage Diaries series | 25:51

In Juan’s second audio diary, he travels back to Mexico to visit his dying grandfather. This is his first time back since he immigrated to the United States.

“I search in my pockets and I find, you know, some money and I say, ‘Well, you know, now I can help out, you know.’ And he just laugh. And I say, ‘Why are you laughing?’ He says, ‘Well, I never expect you to give me some money, ’cause it’s like it was yesterday when you were a kid, and everything.’ And then, I still remember the smile on his face. He kept saying that he was proud of me. He was proud, you know?”

Juan first recorded his audio diary with us 16 years ago. In a recent podcast, we hear from Juan today as he reflects back on his life now and the past 16 years.

This story is part of the Teenage Diaries series produced by Radio Diaries for NPR.

Td_juan_003_l_small

In Juan’s second audio diary, he travels back to Mexico to visit his dying grandfather. This is his first time back since he immigrated to the United States.

“I search in my pockets and I find, you know, some money and I say, ‘Well, you know, now I can help out, you know.’ And he just laugh. And I say, ‘Why are you laughing?’ He says, ‘Well, I never expect you to give me some money, ’cause it’s like it was yesterday when you were a kid, and everything.’ And then, I still remember the smile on his face. He kept saying that he was proud of me. He was proud, you know?”

This story is part of the  Teenage Diaries series  produced by Radio Diaries for NPR. Since 1996, Executive Producer Joe Richman has been giving tape recorders to young people around the country to document their lives. In December of 2012, Radio Diaries will revisit five of the original diarists 16 years after their first recordings. The series airs on NPR’s  All Things Considered  

 

Radio Rookies - Our 9/11: Growing Up in The Aftermath

From WNYC | Part of the WNYC 9/11 Anniversary Programming series | 58:59

To mark the 10th Anniversary of 9/11, Radio Rookies, WNYC’s Peabody Award-winning youth journalism program, presents “Our 9/11: Growing Up in The Aftermath”, an hour special hosted by NPR’s Brooke Gladstone.

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To mark the 10th Anniversary of 9/11, Radio Rookies, WNYC’s Peabody Award-winning youth journalism program, presents “Our 9/11: Growing Up in The Aftermath”, an hour special hosted by NPR’s Brooke Gladstone. 

Last spring, Radio Rookies put out a call for young people to tell us about their 9/11.  In this hour, six young people report on the ways that day and what came after shaped who they are now.  Some faced deep personal losses and others felt changed because they were so young when the towers fell.  Eric’s older brother Paul worked in Tower 1 and never made it home.  Jillian lost her father, a New York City police officer.  Norhan suddenly found herself the target of other kids’ animosity and fear because she is Muslim.  Brendan and Joey weren’t personally affected by the attacks, but they felt called to service.  Erin, whose father was a New York City firefighter, spent the months after 9/11 attending funerals and watching her father struggle to recover from injuries both physical and psychological. 

For more on WNYC's "Decade Nine Eleven" project, please visit our website:
http://www.wnyc.org/series/911-tenth-anniversary/

(The working title of this program was "The 9/11 Generation Speaks")

 

Growing up Anxious

From Youth Radio | Part of the Youth Radio Commentaries series | 01:04

Youth Radio's Justin Cruz has always struggled with anxiety, even as early as fifth grade. But as he's getting ready to start his junior year of high school, he is determined to not let it rule him.

13962421627_783840f671_k_small Youth Radio's Justin Cruz has always struggled with anxiety, even as early as fifth grade. But as he's getting ready to start his junior year of high school, he is determined to not let it rule him.

"No Excuses" Schools: Broken Windows Theory Goes to School

From WFHB | Part of the Interchange series | 59:12

I’m joined by author and educator Jim Horn to discuss his latest book, Work Hard, Be Hard: Journeys Through No Excuses Teaching. Horn explores the ideological contexts for the creation and spread of “no excuses” charter schools with a primary focus on the Knowledge Is Power Program or KIPP.

"No Excuses" means schooling that focuses on psychological interventions aimed to alter children's neurological and behavioral schemas in order to affect socio-cultural values and behaviors. In corporate charter world it also means No Oversight.

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I’m joined by author and educator Jim Horn to discuss his latest book, Work Hard, Be Hard: Journeys Through No Excuses Teaching. Horn explores the ideological contexts for the creation and spread of “no excuses” charter schools with a primary focus on the Knowledge Is Power Program or KIPP.
"No Excuses" means schooling that focuses on psychological interventions aimed to alter children's neurological and behavioral schemas in order to affect socio-cultural values and behaviors. In corporate charter world it also means No Oversight.

GUEST
Jim Horn is Professor of Educational Leadership at Cambridge College, Cambridge, MA. He has published widely on theoretical and practical issues related to education, and with co-author, Denise Wilburn, he published The Mismeasure of Education in 2013. He also has been an education blogger at Schools Matter since 2005. Jim joins us via Skype this evening.
 
MUSIC
"The Headmaster Ritual" by the Smiths
"Gwan a School" by Sister Nancy
"We Do What We're Told (Milgram's 37)" by Peter Gabriel
"Starfish and Coffee" by Prince 

Profile of an Accidental Shooting

From Youth Radio | 07:06

This is the story of 15-year-old Kenzo Dix who was shot and accidentally killed by his best friend Michael; the two boys were playing with Michael's father's gun.

Default-piece-image-2 In recent years, as Americans try to comprehend school shootings by students in Colorado, Georgia and elsewhere, the side issue of accidental shootings is often overlooked. In fact, the federal government reports more young people dying in accidental shootings than at the scene of schoolyard mayhem. In 1994, 15-year-old Kenzo Dix was shot and accidentally killed by his best friend Michael; the two boys were playing with Michael's father's gun. The story of the accidental shooting is told through interviews with Michael (the shooter) and with the brother of the deceased, Kilani Dix. Both young men are former Youth Radio students who never before talked to the press about this shared tragedy and its aftermath. The narrator, Youth Radio's Jacinda Abcarian, knew them when they were all students at Berkeley High School. In 1998 Kenzo Dix's parents sued Beretta, the manufacturer of the gun that killed their sun. They claimed the gun lacked adequate safety locks and warnings; a jury in Oakland found in favor of the gun manufacturer, but the case was followed by a huge wave of wrongful death lawsuits. Profile of An Accidental Shooting was first aired on the fifth anniversary of the death of Kenzo Dix in 1999. But there's an update to this story. In September 2003, California Governor Gray Davis signed a law that requires new semiautomatic handgun models sold in California to have either a clear loaded-chamber indicator or a magazine disconnect safety by 2006 ... and to have both safety devices by 2007. This is the strongest legislation for safe-gun design in the country.