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Playlist: Things To Listen To

Compiled By: Susanna Bolle

Caption: PRX default Playlist image
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Re-breathing Air

From John Diliberto | Part of the Echo Location: Soundings for New Music series | 03:32

The French electro-duo celebrates 10th Anniversary of Moon Safari

Airjb_small It's been a decade since Air released their debut album, Moon Safari. That modest release has had echoes that continue a decade later with artists like Zero 7, Goldfrapp and many more taking notes from Air's retro music for the future. Pulling sounds from old Moog synthesizers, Fender Rhodes pianos and vocoders, Air articulated a mix of cocktail cool and serenely surreal pop that hasn't dated a second. Moon Safari has just been re-released in a deluxe 10th Anniversary Edition. We go back to our 1998 interview with Air and see how prescient they were about their music.

Insomnia

From Salt Institute for Documentary Studies | 06:08

During the day, Michael White works at the concession booth, handing out popcorn and candy at the movie theatre. But when night comes, he cannot sleep.

Saltlogo_small During the day, Michael White works at the concession booth, handing out popcorn and candy at the movie theatre. But when night comes, he cannot sleep.

City X

From Jonathan Mitchell | 22:33

A history of the mall, as told by an anonymous city

Playing
City X
From
Jonathan Mitchell

Cityximage_small City X is a history of the modern shopping mall through perspectives of people living in a real, yet unnamed, city. Using a sound rich audio mosaic of observations and ruminations, all scored to Muzak, the universal mall experience comes to life, for better or for worse. City X was commissioned by Hearing Voices radio with funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. It was first broadcast (in a shortened form) on NPR's Living on Earth in November, 2004. The version presented here is the full length version of the piece It has been heard on: NPR's Living on Earth WUIS's Living in Illinois WBEZ's re:Sound Third Coast Festival website (www.thirdcoastfestival.org) PRX podcast

"Where The Ink Sinks In": Interview with Teen Graffiti Taggers

From Curie Youth Radio | 06:48

An exploration of the subculture of "graffiti art": three teen taggers -- not gang affiliated -- talk about their love for climbing light poles and making their mark with a spray can.

Graffiti1_small One of the teens in this piece says, "I'll die with a spray can in my hand." This set of interviews, mixed with hip hop samples, lets us hear about the adventures, motivations, and justifications of three teens who call themselves graffiti artists. The teens in this piece are not gangbangers, nor is their graffiti gang-related. They are committed to tagging as a form of artistic expression. The interviews are candid, sometimes funny, and engaging.

Stencil Pirates

From Adam Allington | 03:50

Street artist Josh McPhee talks about the versitility of stenciling

Sfuhaifllng_small Josh McPhee, a Chicago-based street artist and Author of "Stencil Pirates" took time to speak with me after a lecture in Portland, Maine. Stencils, unlike traditional hip-hop graffiti are quick and easy ways to pepper an urban landscape with messages. They often employ a certain base language--a picture and text. Most often people can't help but read and absorb the message as they walk by. Mcphee points out that street art, unlike art in galleries reaches a wider cross section of people for whom art may not be a part of their daily lives.

Stenciling Paris

From Sarah Elzas | 03:58

An audio tour of street art

Streetart_small Walk around certain Paris neighborhoods and look on building walls or store gratings, and you'll see spray-painted figures of people or animals, some with words or phrases. This genre of art--mostly stencils, not quite grafitti--came to life in France in the early 1980s. It's now almost institutionalized, with organizations providing backing for new artists each year. Each artist has unique style: provocative women, cute animals, arrows, clever catchphrases--anything to engage with the public. In this piece, writer Lisa Pham gives a tour of the stencil art on the streets of Paris' 5th arrondisment. Along the way we meet various people, including the artist Jef Aerosol.

You Are Here: 1000 years of mapmaking history in one brief segment

From Jackson Braider | 08:50

A short introduction to the wonderful world of maps

Worldmap_small Maps set us up to face a profound existential challenge: They can tell us "you are here" -- complete with star and arrow -- but what they're pointing to is "there" on the map. Independent producer Jackson Braider talks with two enthusiasts who tell us that maps are far more than tools to tell us how to get there from here. Ronald Grim is the curator of the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library whose recent "Journeys of the Imagination" exhibition offered 50 different ways of seeing the world. Dennis Cosgrove, professor of geography at UCLA, reminds us that "war is God's way of teaching geography to Americans."

Midlife Web Diary

From Susan Barrett Price | Part of the Family History: The Stars Who Guide Us series | 06:40

Middle-aged corporate malcontent goes online, to be found by mom

Reinventionsq_small At the age of 50 I was a colorless corporate malcontent. I decided to engage the world by keeping an anonymous online diary. No one noticed. The initial dangerous thought turned into a challenge to become more entertaining. The result: I wound up being discovered, not by the colorful world of writers and artists, but by ... my mother.

The Tongass National Forest Part One

From Guy Hand | 11:11

The wet and wild nature of Alaska's Tongass National Forest, the largest intact temperate rain forest in the world.

Tongass1_small The first of an award winning two-part show on Alaska's Tongass National Forest. Part One looks at the natural history of the Tongass. (Part Two looks at the contentious legacy of logging on the Tongass.) From the script: "Maybe it's the fluidity of this place, the way the rain softens hard edges, that gives the Tongass a knack for teaching connections: how salmon connect to trees, how trees connect to caves, how an intact, healthy ecosystem flows within itself, cycle within cycle." The Tongass aired on Living On Earth and won first place for Broadcast Feature Reporting in 2002 from the Society of Environmental Journalists.

Polar Bears: Branding Global Warming

From Nathanael Johnson | 07:04

Bear as symbol vs. bear in person

Icy_small Lede: What is a polar bear? Okay, sure, it?s a big white member of the Ursus genus, but it?s also a symbol. These days lots of people are thinking of polar bears in terms of what they signify, more than what they actually are. When Time Magazine published a special report on global warming, editors put a polar bear on the cover. Reporter Nathanael Johnson went to find out what it is about polar bears that makes them such ideal poster-animals of global warming. I talk to some real live polar bears and a cute-ologist, then chat up a Sierra Club rep about branding strategy.

Catalogue of Ships (Series)

Produced by Michael Kraskin

Most recent piece in this series:

The Twelve

From Michael Kraskin | Part of the Catalogue of Ships series | 08:52

Default-piece-image-2 A contemplative trip to Mount Olympus results in observations of international relations on the micro level. For one brief moment, America had the good will of the whole world.

Catalogue of Ships (Series)

Produced by Michael Kraskin

Most recent piece in this series:

The Twelve

From Michael Kraskin | Part of the Catalogue of Ships series | 08:52

Default-piece-image-0 A contemplative trip to Mount Olympus results in observations of international relations on the micro level. For one brief moment, America had the good will of the whole world.

James Beard: Brave New Kitchen

From Melissa Waldron Lehner | 08:36

Friends of Beard talk about his influence on the world of food.

Beardedited_small Long before the head of the James Beard Foundation was caught cooking the books, and long before the Foundation was even created, James Beard was cooking – cooking up a food revolution, that is. In the 1940s & 50s when the nation was reveling in American Jell-O salads, cocktail wiener canapes, and Pepsi-Cola Cakes, James Beard was busy creating local, seasonal American dishes, launching a revolution in food that is now only starting to be realized. Ruth Reichl, editor in chief of Gourmet magazine, food historian Betty Fussell, Alfred A Knopf editor Judith Jones, and NYU food studies professor Marion Nestle join restaurant consultant and author Clark Wolf, in an intimate discussion about Beard’s life and the enormous influences of this remarkable chef.