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LGBTQ youth radio: Gilbert Baker, creator of the rainbow flag - part 1 of 2

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

Gilbert Baker, longtime LGBTQ activist and creator of the rainbow flag, talks with OutCasting youth participant Alex in one of his last interviews

Gilbert-baker-240px_small Gilbert Baker, longtime LGBTQ activist and creator of the rainbow flag, talks with OutCasting youth partipant Alex about his life, his activism, his flag, and more in this two part interview that connects LGBTQ youth with history.  This interview was recorded just a month before Gilbert's untimely death, and is thus one of the last interviews he did.  This is Part 1 of a two part interview.  Part 2 is also available.  In OutCasting Overtime, Alex gives a remembrance of Gilbert.

LGBTQ youth radio: Gilbert Baker, creator of the rainbow flag - part 2 of 2

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

Gilbert Baker, longtime LGBTQ activist and creator of the rainbow flag, talks with OutCasting youth participant Alex in one of his last interviews

Gilbert-baker-240px_small Gilbert Baker, longtime LGBTQ activist and creator of the rainbow flag, talks with OutCasting youth partipant Alex about his life, his activism, his flag, and more in this two part interview that connects LGBTQ youth with history.  This interview was recorded just a month before Gilbert's untimely death, and is thus one of the last interviews he did.  This is Part 2 of a 2 part interview.

LGBTQ youth remember the late Gilbert Baker, creator of the rainbow flag

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | 03:42

OutCasting youth participant Alex remembers Gilbert Baker, longtime LGBTQ activist and creator of the rainbow flag

Gilbert-baker-240px_small On March 1, 2017, OutCasting, public radio's LGBTQ youth program, interviewed Gilbert Baker, longtime LGBTQ activist and creator of the rainbow flag.  This resulted in a two part interview, also available here on PRX.  On March 31, Gilbert died unexpected in his sleep.  Unlike many of our guests, who join us by phone, Gilbert wanted to meet our youth participants, so he came into the studio in person and spent an entire session just talking with the kids and hearing their stories.  This created memories they'll never forget.  In this piece, OutCaster Alex, who conducted the interview with Gilbert, shares his thoughts on meeting Gilbert and the shock he felt when he heard about Gilbert's untimely death.

Gay youth look back on the Stonewall riots - PART 2 OF 2

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

LGBTQ youth are often unaware of their own history. In this occasional series, OutCasting connects them with that history. This is part 2 of a two part series looking back on the Stonewall riots, which marked a turning point in gay activism. Our guest is Karla Jay, author, longtime activist, and retired Distinguished Professor of Queer Studies and Women's Studies.

Karla-jay-240_small It has been argued about and written about.  Films, some controversial, have been made about it.  But it has also been celebrated and commemorated for nearly half a century — 48 years, to be exact.   Of course, we're talking about the Stonewall uprising, a series of riots at and near the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in the West Village in New York City.

The uprising at the Stonewall Inn began after a police raid, then a common occurrence at gay bars in the city, on the night of June 27, 1969, and continuing for several nights afterward.  Judy Garland had just died at the age of 47, the first term of the Nixon/Agnew administration was barely five months old, and NASA was readying Apollo 11, the space mission that would land humans on the moon for the first time less than a month later.  Homosexuality was still considered a mental disorder, and the Left, despite its advocacy of a newly equal society for all minorities, was, as we look back on it now, surprisingly hostile to homosexuals.  An assimilationist approach dominated the gay activism that had been building for nearly 20 years, starting with the early "homophile" groups — the Mattachine Society for gay men and the Daughters of Bilitis for gay women.  As the U.S. became increasingly polarized over the Vietnam War, gay activism became less assimilationist and more militant.

On that hot summer night, gay men, lesbians, and street transvestites (as they were called at the time) fought back against the police during and after the raid.  Depending on whom you ask, these riots might be said to have marked, catalyzed, or even caused a dramatic turn in gay activism.

In this two part interview, we talk with Dr. Karla Jay, a longtime activist and author.  She was involved in the second wave of feminism and was the first female chair of the Gay Liberation Front, an early post-Stonewall activist group.  She is also a retired Distinguished Professor of Queer Studies and Women’s Studies at Pace University in New York City.

Karla talks about what it was like for gay people in the U.S. before Stonewall, a time when most people kept quiet about their sexual orientation and couldn't even legally dance together.  As the author and activist Michelangelo Signorile characterized it in his three-part interview on OutCasting , the gay bar has historically been to gay people what the black church was to African-Americans: a sanctuary for people who could be in danger if they congregated in public.  An arrest at a gay bar — merely for being there — could ruin your life.  In this in-depth interview, Karla talks about the riots themselves and how they marked a turning point, setting the stage for gay activism on a larger scale and of a more militant type than before.

This interview is part of an OutCasting series connecting LGBTQ youth to their history.  As we've noted before, LGBTQ history is generally not taught in school and is rarely passed down from generation to generation within families, so unlike those of other minority groups, our history is hidden, and LGBTQ young people — and many listeners today — never get to learn about the longstanding challenges the LGBTQ community has faced and met in our fight for acceptance and equality under the law.  Our youth rarely come to know that they stand on the shoulders of activists who fought battles over many decades to create the kind of climate for LGBTQ people we have today.  Though that climate is better in many ways than it was in the past, our movement still has far more to accomplish, especially as the Age of Trump threatens many of the advances we've achieved.

Minority stress in LGBTQ people

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

Everyone experiences stress, but when you're LGBTQ, it gets worse because of stigma, prejudice, and discrimination, and has particularly strong effects on LGBTQ youth, who are at greatly heightened risk for substance abuse and suicide. In this program, we look at minority stress in LGBTQ people with an eminent scholar on the topic, Ilan Meyer, Ph.D., of the UCLA School of Law.

Ilan-meyer-240_small Everyone has stresses in their lives.  But when you're a member of a minority, things get worse.  The ordinary stresses can strike more frequently, and there are new stresses resulting from discrimination.  And if you're LGBTQ, the stigma and prejudice may be inflicted by your own family and friends.  You can internalize negative stereotypes.  You can feel forced to the soul-deadening concealment of your identity.  You may come to expect rejection.  You are at greater risk of bullying and physical violence.  And for people who are LGBTQ who are also members of other minorities, things can get worse still.  It can add up to a toxic mix particularly for vulnerable LGBTQ youth, leading to depression, desperation, and suicidal tendencies.

On this edition, OutCaster Sarah talks with Ilan H. Meyer, Ph.D., Williams Distinguished Senior Scholar of Public Policy at the Williams Institute for Sexual Orientation Law and Public Policy at the UCLA School of Law.  Through a number of frequently cited papers, Dr. Meyer has developed a model of minority stress for examining the factors that can cause health disparities between LGBTQ people and straight, cisgender people.

Representation of LGBTQ people in the media

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

Media representation has a strong influence on how LGBTQ people are viewed and treated by society. On this month’s OutCasting, we talk Professor Larry Gross about the representation of LGBTQ people in media. Larry Gross is a professor of communication at USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, an eminent authority in gay and lesbian studies.

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Media can be a force, shaping the way we understand the world.  The news, movies, and television shows we watch all contribute to societal norms, such as those about the LGBTQ community.   This isn’t always a bad thing — but it can be.  Portrayals of gay and trans lives, for example, are often difficult to find.  When they do exist, they are often littered with stereotypes.
Media doesn’t exist in a vacuum — things that are seen on screen often influence things in the real world.  Increased visibility of LGBTQ people in the media has happened alongside a series of positive changes for the LGBTQ community.
In this episode, Outcaster Callie interviews Larry Gross, professor of communication at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California.  He is a pioneer in the field of gay and lesbian studies, having written multiple books on the topic.  One of his books is Up From Invisibility, which follows the history of gay men and lesbians in the media.

In this interview, Professor Gross takes us through this history, from the invisibility and negative portrayals of LGBTQ people in the 50’s and 60’s to the impact of reality television in the 90’s and today. 

OutCasting 0044 - Agender identity - part 2 of 2

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

Gender is much more complex than male and female. OutCasting youth participant Jamie talks with friend Tori about non-binary gender and Tori's experiences as an agender person. This is part 2 of a 2 part series. The first part is also available here on PRX. Link in Long Description, below.

Agender-flag-240_small The way the U.S. views gender has been changing as newer generations recognize the limitations of the gender binary.  Young people are increasingly challenging traditional gender norms: about half of the millennial generation agree that gender isn’t limited to male and female.  As a result of this changing mindset, gender-fluid and nonbinary people have been able to carve out more of a space for themselves in society.  Facebook now offer custom gender identities, many universities accept gender-neutral pronouns, and schools have seen a push to adopt gender-neutral bathrooms.  In this episode, OutCaster Jamie talks with their friend Tori about Tori’s experiences as an agender person.  This is the second part of a two part series; the first part is available here on PRX at http://www.prx.org/pieces/222098-outcasting-0043-agender-identity-part-1-of-2.

OutCasting Overtime - January 2018 - Is being bisexual queer enough for the LGBTQ community?

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting Overtime series | 07:47

In this piece, OutCasting youth participant Samantha, a participant in our bureau at Michigan State University, ponders on what it means to be bisexual and whether the LGBTQ community really accepts her identity.

Oc-msu-samantha-240px_small OutCaster Samantha of our Michigan State University bureau considers whether the LGBTQ community considers bisexuals to be queer enough to belong.  She also ponders bisexuality at different points along the Kinsey scale.

Hate Crimes

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting Overtime series | 07:21

OutCasters Andrea and Dhruv reflect on anti-LGBTQ hate crimes in an essay read by Andrea.

Oc-west-andrea-dhruv-621-240x240_small LGBTQ people are at disproportionate risk of becoming victims of hate crimes.  In an essay ready by OutCaster Andrea and written by OutCasters Andrea and Dhruv (right), they reflect on the murder of Matthew Shepard 20 years ago and the lack of hate crime laws at the time. They consider how the incidences of hate crimes today affect LGBTQ youth, who must grow up knowing that there are still people who hate them for who they are.

OutCasting 0045 – Gay parenting – interview with Gabriel Blau, longtime LGBTQ advocate

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

OutCaster Jamie talks with Gabriel Blau about his and his husband’s experiences being gay parents and adopting their son.

Gabriel-blau-240_small In recent history, a new visibility for gay parents -- people in committed same-sex relationships -- has developed. In addition to facing all of the issues and having to learn all the new skills that any heterosexual parents have to, gay parents have to deal with unique situations, such as overcoming the challenges of conception, surrogacy, or adoption.

On this edition of OutCasting, we speak with Gabriel Blau, a non-profit funding consultant and LGBTQ advocate, about his and his partner’s personal experiences being gay parents. Gabriel talks about his family’s process of adoption and about the kindness and rejection one may encounter from their community.

OutCasting 0048 – Intersex – part 1

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

This week on OutCasting, public radio’s LGBTQ youth program, we explore the phenomenon of intersex. Professors Georgiann Davis and Cary Gabriel Costello, who are both intersex, tell us about what that means and about some of the issues faced by intersex people.

Georgiann-davis-240_small

AUDIO PROMOS AVAILABLE

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LANGUAGE ADVISORY - This is a program about the phenomenon of intersex. It is both scientific and personal in nature. Because the term intersex refers to people who, among other things, are born with both male and female sex traits and organs, this program includes the words ovary, testes, uterus, fallopian tubes, genitals, genitalia, gonads, gonadism, breasts, and penetrative vaginal sex (as a physician-presumed desired result in adulthood, around 19:10).


There is nothing indecent about the use of these words in this context. Nevertheless, we have included a content notice at the beginning of the program.


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Most of us are conditioned to think of sex in binary terms – people are either male or female, one or the other.  But nature is rarely if ever binary, and some people are born with a combination of male and female organs, internal and external, and these people are called intersex.  (The term intersex also encompasses other things, such as different ways in which people’s bodies react to hormones.)  People can be intersex without even knowing of it; we recall a recent story of a man in his seventies who, following abdominal surgery, discovered that he had a uterus and ovaries.

On this edition of OutCasting, we talk with two eminent authorities on intersex who are intersex themselves: Dr. Georgiann Davis, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and the board president of InterACT: Advocates for Intersex Youth, and Dr. Cary Gabriel Costello, Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee and the coordinator of the LGBT Studies Program there.

On this episode, we look into questions like:  How does the medical profession deal with intersex people?  What kinds of discrimination to intersex people experience?  Is it a medical emergency if a baby is born with intersex traits?  Is it justifiable to perform life-affecting elective surgery on an infant simply to try to eliminate his or her intersex traits?  Can an intersex people just be allowed to grow up with their intersex traits intact?  Join us for this fascinating discussion.

OutCasting 0049 – Intersex – part 2

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

This week on OutCasting, public radio’s LGBTQ youth program, we continue our exploration of the phenomenon of intersex. Professors Georgiann Davis and Cary Gabriel Costello, who are both intersex, tell us about what that means and about some of the issues faced by intersex people.

Cary-gabriel-costello-and-georgiann-davis-240px_small

Most of us are conditioned to think of sex in binary terms – people are either male or female, one or the other.  But nature is rarely if ever binary, and some people are born with a combination of male and female organs, internal and external, and these people are called intersex.  (The term intersex also encompasses other things, such as different ways in which people’s bodies react to hormones.)  People can be intersex without even knowing of it; we recall a recent story of a man in his seventies who, following abdominal surgery, discovered that he had a uterus and ovaries.
On this edition of OutCasting, we continue our discussion with two eminent authorities on intersex who are intersex themselves: Dr. Georgiann Davis, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and the board president of InterACT: Advocates for Intersex Youth, and Dr. Cary Gabriel Costello, Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee and the coordinator of the LGBT Studies Program there.
On this episode, we look into questions like:  How does the medical profession deal with intersex people?  What kinds of discrimination to intersex people experience?  Is it a medical emergency if a baby is born with intersex traits?  Is it justifiable to perform life-affecting elective surgery on an infant simply to try to eliminate his or her intersex traits?  Can an intersex people just be allowed to grow up with their intersex traits intact?  Join us for the conclusion of this fascinating discussion.

OutCasting 51 - LGBTQ women and AIDS activism

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

August 2018 - What drew LGBTQ women, who were in one of the lowest risk groups, to AIDS activism during the worst of the epidemic? Guest Ann Northrop, longtime journalist and activist. Part 1 of 2. Part 2 will be posted September 1, 2018.

Ann_northrop_a-1_240_credit_bill_bahlman_small This is part 1 of a 2 part series.  Part 2 will be available on September 1, 2018.

(August 1, 2018)  The AIDS crisis exacted a terrible toll on LGBTQ people and other populations.  In the early years of the epidemic, an AIDS diagnosis was almost invariably fatal.  In the U.S., the groups most affected were gay men, intravenous drug users, hemophiliacs, and Haitians.  Because gay men were among the first populations to be identified as high risk, AIDS was known in the early years as a gay disease, and because of that, people with AIDS were highly stigmatized.  In fact, before the disease was called AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), it was called GRID — Gay Related Immunodeficiency Disease. 

Barely a decade after the Stonewall riots marked the beginning of the modern gay rights movement and an increased level visibility and freedom for LGBTQ people, AIDS precipitated a backlash.  The federal government, which had sprung into action when a small number of Americans contracted Legionnaire’s disease, was almost completely unresponsive during the early years of the AIDS epidemic, as dozens of initial cases became hundreds, then thousands, then tens of thousands.  Notoriously, President Ronald Reagan didn’t publicly utter the word AIDS until several years into the epidemic.  The general public sentiment ranged from indifference to “you brought this on yourself” hostility.

Affected and infected populations had to be activists in ways that had little parallel with other diseases.  LGBTQ women were in one of the population groups least at risk for contracting the disease, yet many of them played very important roles in AIDS activism.  What drew them into the movement?

In this edition of OutCasting, youth participant Lauren begins a two-part conversation with Ann Northrop, a longtime journalist and activist.  Ann is the co-host of Gay USA, TV’s weekly LGBT news hour.  During the years at the height of the epidemic, she was active in New York’s ACT UP – the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power — an influential group that countered public indifference and worked to spur the government into action.

OutCasting 0053 – Trans youth transitioning – part 1 of a series

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

This week on OutCasting, public radio’s LGBTQ youth program, we begin a conversation about trans youth transitioning. What are the factors to consider when young transgender people want to medically transition? Guests Dr. John Steever, physician, and Dr. Matthew Oransky, a psychologist. Both work at Mount Sinai Hospital in NY and help young transgender people who want to transition.

Steever-oransky-240_small (October 1, 2018)   Trans youth transitioning.  On this edition of OutCasting, we consider transgender youth who want to start medical transition at a relatively early age.  Of course, parents often worry that their children may be too young to know what they really want, that medical transition may include surgery and other medical treatments that can be difficult or impossible to undo.  So what’s the best answer?  What options are available to transgender youth?  Are there benefits to starting transition early?  Are there disadvantages?  And what kinds of considerations go into making these decisions?

To answer some of these questions, OutCaster Lauren talks with Dr. John Steever, a physician, and Dr. Matthew Oransky, a psychologist.  Both doctors work at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York and help young transgender people with transitioning.  This is part 1 of a series.

March 2019 – Trans teen has bad doctor experience

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting Overtime series | 06:26

OutCaster Andrew talks about his experience with a doctor who was insensitive to the needs of her trans patient.

Oc-westchester-andrew-379-240px_small March 2019 – Trans-insensitive doctor.  OutCaster Andrew talks about what can go wrong when doctors are uncomfortable with transgender patients or insensitive to their needs, and how a trans-sensitive doctor can make a world of difference.

December 2019 - Gender dysphoria - part 2 of a 2 part conversation

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting Overtime series | 12:01

December 1, 2019 - Is it a mental illness? Do trans people have to medically transition to really be trans? OutCasters Andrew and Kaspar discuss. Part 2 of 2.

Outcasting-westchester-kaspar-andrew-20190814_220123-240_small OutCasters Andrew and Kaspar, who are transgender, talk about gender dysphoria, whether it's proper to classify it as a mental illness, and whether trans people need to undergo medical transition, including hormone therapy, surgery, or both, to be considered truly trans.  Second of a two part series.

December 2019 - Gender dysphoria - part 2 of a 2 part conversation

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting Overtime series | 12:01

December 1, 2019 - Is it a mental illness? Do trans people have to medically transition to really be trans? OutCasters Andrew and Kaspar discuss. Part 2 of 2.

Outcasting-westchester-kaspar-andrew-20190814_220123-240_small OutCasters Andrew and Kaspar, who are transgender, talk about gender dysphoria, whether it's proper to classify it as a mental illness, and whether trans people need to undergo medical transition, including hormone therapy, surgery, or both, to be considered truly trans.  Second of a two part series.

March 2020 - Superficial representation of LGBTQ people in recent Disney films

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting Overtime series | 05:20

Superficial representation of LGBTQ people in recent Disney films

Oc-westchester-amalee-chris-6580-240px_small March 1, 2020 - OutCaster Amalee considers the superficial representation of LGBTQ people in recent Disney movies.  Chris reads.

OutCasting 0071 - Conversion therapy - part 4 of 4

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

An exploration of a discredited and often harmful practice of trying to change gay to straight.

0070-0071-sam-brinton-with-andrew240_small Conversion therapy
April 1, 2020 - In the last part of this four part OutCasting series, we conclude our conversation about conversion therapy, the practice of trying to change someone's sexuality from gay or bisexual to straight.  Homosexuality used to be defined as a mental disorder, and many psychiatrists used to practice conversion therapy.  The practice is now widely discredited within the medical and mental health professions, but it still exists throughout the country, now usually associated with religious institutions rather than medical institutions.  What actually happens during conversion therapy, and what effects do these practices have on young people?

In the January and February 2020 editions of OutCasting, our guest was Jack Drescher, a gay psychiatrist and psychoanalyst in private practice in New York City.  Dr. Drescher has been working with LGBTQ patients for over 30 years, and writing about conversion therapy for over 20 years.

Dr. Drescher's interview gives an expert and technical perspective on conversion therapy.  In March, we turned to the personal story of Sam Brinton, who was subjected to conversion therapy as a child and survived to tell about it.  Sam, who uses they/them pronouns, founded and leads the 50 Bills, 50 States campaign, which aims to bring legislation that bans conversion therapy to all 50 states.  They talked with OutCaster Andrew.  This is part two of that interview.  After the interview, OutCaster Lucas talks about the assumptions about LGBTQ identity that fuel the perceived need to turn gay people straight.

OutCasting 0073 - The Covid-19 and AIDS pandemics - Part 2

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

The Covid-19 and AIDS epidemics - similarities and notable differences

0072-jay-blotcher-lucas-2-240_small

The Covid-19 and AIDS pandemics

June 1, 2020 - It's too early to tell about the long-term impact Covid-19 will have on the world — though of course in the short term, we've already experienced illness and death and social, economic, and political disruption on a massive scale.  Covid could become something unimaginable, but the social distancing and other preventative measures we're taking has kept the disease from spiraling completely out of control, and there's hope that we'll have effective vaccines within the next year or two.

 

In contrast, the AIDS pandemic, which began in 1981, was allowed to spiral out of control, and it was about 15 years from the beginning of the outbreak until the development of effective treatments in the mid 90s.  Even now, nearly 40 years later, there is no vaccine.  UN AIDS reports that as of the end of 2018, nearly 75 million people had been infected with HIV and 32 million had died.  

Some people have been suggesting that what we're feeling now in the early days of the Covid outbreak must be similar   to how it felt at the beginning of the AIDS crisis.  But there were crucial differences.

In a commentary in the April 2020 edition of OutCasting Overtime, OutCaster Chris said:

Imagine how much lower the number of people lost to AIDS might have been if people hadn't hated gay men and had i nstead recognized AIDS as a worldwide health crisis right from the beginning.

And imagine how you, today -- dealing with this new coronavirus -- would be panicking if Covid were raging in your community but there was no effective public response.  Imagine this sickness and death becoming pervasive among your own friends and family, and asking, pleading, screaming for help, but no one listens, no one really cares about the infected, and the government sits on money that should be released for developing a vaccine or cure or for caring for those who are sick.  Imagine the rage and grief you'd feel as your friends were getting sick and dying and the rest of the world was ignoring the whole thing. 

Joining us to help us understand and not just imagine is our guest, Jay Blotcher.  Jay is a veteran journalist and activist.  He arrived in New York City in 1982.  He began writing for The New York Native, the leading gay newspaper at the time, and then became associate producer of “Our Time,” a weekly TV show about LGBT life in  New York City, hosted by the activist and historian Vito Russo.  Jay joined ACT UP/New York in 1987, the year the group was founded.  He took part in key demonstrations, like the FDA protest in 1988, Stop the Church in 1989, and the demonstration at the National Institutes of Health in 1990.  He served as head of ACT UP's Media Committee, taking the helm from Michelangelo Signorile.  Most recently, Jay was the editor of Rainbow Warrior: My Life in Color, the memoir of Gilbert Baker, creator of the rainbow flag. Jay is also a member of the Gilbert Baker Foundation and co-founded Public Impact Media Consultants, a public relations firm for progressive groups and individuals.   He talks with OutCaster Lucas.

OutCasting 0077 - Using religion to discriminate against LGBTQ people - part 2 of a series

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

Can a cakeshop legally cite religious beliefs in refusing to make a wedding cake for a same sex couple? And what’s the bigger picture?

0076-jenny-pizer-ll-credit-lucas_small Using religion to discriminate against LGBTQ people - part 2 of a series

October 1, 2020 - There are some religious people, congregations, and religions that support LGBTQ people.  In the Episcopal Church, Bishop Gene Robinson was the first openly gay Bishop — but his consecration led to a worldwide split in the church over the issue of homosexuality.  In New York City, Congregation Beit Simchat Torah is an LGBTQ-welcoming synagogue with an openly gay leader, Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum.  Both Bishop Gene and Rabbi Kleinbaum were guests on earlier editions of OutCasting; you can listen to their interviews at OutCastingMedia.org.

But historically, many religions have condemned LGBTQ people.  The Catholic church has described homosexuality as an “intrinsic disorder” and encouraged people to “condemn the sin, not the sinner” — as if people can just rip sexuality out of their lives without inflicting great harm.  Any number of religious counselors continue to practice conversion or reparative therapy to “cure” people of being gay even as a growing number of states, and even some other countries, recognize that this “treatment” is ineffective and potentially dangerous.  We did a series in early 2020 on conversion therapy; it’s also available at OutCastingMedia.org.

(STATIONS:  The conversion therapy series is available here on PRX.  We can make the earlier interviews with Bishop Gene and Rabbi Kleinbaum available for broadcast on request.)

As the law is catching up with growing public acceptance of LGBTQ people and as we have secured a number of important civil rights, there’s a movement determined to put us firmly back in our place, as they would have it.  Cakeshops and florists claim that they’re entitled to deny their services to us because they say that providing services to LGBTQ people would violate their “religious liberty.”  This discrimination would never be seen as legitimate if it were directed at any other minority group.  Just imagine it — a shop owner says: “My religious liberty prevents me from serving Black people, or Jewish people, so go away.”  It’s unthinkable that that would be seen as acceptable in today’s world.  And of course, there are businesses where the stakes would be much higher if it becomes the law that businesses can just turn away LGBTQ people based on a religious objection.

So is there any legitimacy when a business owner cites “religious liberty” to justify denying service to LGBTQ people?  What are the contours of religious liberty?  What’s supposed to happen when someone, citing religious liberty, discriminates against LGBTQ people, thus denying their equality?  What does “equality” mean in the United States?  Does one take precedence over the other when they come into conflict?

Joining us to delve into this issue is Jennifer C. Pizer.  Jenny is the Senior Counsel and Director of Law and Policy for Lambda Legal, the country's oldest and largest legal organization seeking full recognition of the civil rights of LGBT people and everyone living with HIV.

OutCasting 0079 -- Using religion to discriminate against LGBTQ people -- part 4 of a series

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

Can a cakeshop legally cite religious beliefs in refusing to make a wedding cake for a same sex couple? And what’s the bigger picture?

0076-jenny-pizer-ll-credit-lucas_small

Using religion to discriminate against LGBTQ people - part 4 of a series

December 1, 2020 — There are some religious people, congregations, and religions that support LGBTQ people.  In the Episcopal Church, Bishop Gene Robinson was the first openly gay Bishop — but his consecration led to a worldwide split in the church over the issue of homosexuality.  In New York City, Congregation Beit Simchat Torah is an LGBTQ-welcoming synagogue with an openly gay leader, Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum.  Both Bishop Gene and Rabbi Kleinbaum were guests on earlier editions of OutCasting; you can listen to their interviews at OutCastingMedia.org.

But historically, many religions have condemned LGBTQ people.  The Catholic church has described homosexuality as an “intrinsic disorder” and encouraged people to “condemn the sin, not the sinner” — as if people can just rip sexuality out of their lives without inflicting great harm.  Any number of religious counselors continue to practice conversion or reparative therapy to “cure” people of being gay even as a growing number of states, and even some other countries, recognize that this “treatment” is ineffective and potentially dangerous.  We did a series in early 2020 on conversion therapy; it’s also available at OutCastingMedia.org.

(STATIONS:  The conversion therapy series is available here on PRX.  We can make the earlier interviews with Bishop Gene and Rabbi Kleinbaum available for broadcast on request.)

As the law is catching up with growing public acceptance of LGBTQ people and as we have secured a number of important civil rights, there’s a movement determined to put us firmly back in our place, as they would have it.  Cakeshops and florists claim that they’re entitled to deny their services to us because they say that providing services to LGBTQ people would violate their “religious liberty.”  This discrimination would never be seen as legitimate if it were directed at any other minority group.  Just imagine it — a shop owner says: “My religious liberty prevents me from serving Black people, or Jewish people, so go away.”  It’s unthinkable that that would be seen as acceptable in today’s world.  And of course, there are businesses where the stakes would be much higher if it becomes the law that businesses can just turn away LGBTQ people based on a religious objection.

So is there any legitimacy when a business owner cites “religious liberty” to justify denying service to LGBTQ people?  What are the contours of religious liberty?  What’s supposed to happen when someone, citing religious liberty, discriminates against LGBTQ people, thus denying their equality?  What does “equality” mean in the United States?  Does one take precedence over the other when they come into conflict?


Joining us to delve into this issue is Jennifer C. Pizer.  Jenny is the Senior Counsel and Director of Law and Policy for Lambda Legal, the country's oldest and largest legal organization seeking full recognition of the civil rights of LGBT people and everyone living with HIV.


This fourth part of a multipart series also includes commentary by OutCaster Chris on recent developments including an excerpt from an OutCasting Overtime commentary on the October statement by Supreme Court Justice Thomas, joined by Justice Alito, attacking the Court’s marriage equality decision in the Obergefell case and complaining about how that case has led to what they see as unjustified criticism of people who hold religious beliefs against same sex marriage.

December 2020 – LGBTQ candidates, LGBTQ youth

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting Overtime series | 07:00

OutCaster Justin talks about what it means to LGBTQ youth, especially struggling youth, to see LGBTQ people elected to public office.

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December 1, 2020 In the November election, voters from states including Delaware, Georgia, Tennessee, Vermont, and New York elected LGBTQ candidates to state and federal office.  This obviously means that LGBTQ perspectives are going to heard during the legislative process – but what is the message heard by LGBTQ youth, especially those who may be struggling?  Justin shares the perspectives of the OutCasting team.

OutCasting 0083 -- Using religion to discriminate against LGBTQ people -- part 8 of a series

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

Can a cakeshop legally cite religious beliefs in refusing to make a wedding cake for a same sex couple? And what’s the bigger picture?

0076-jenny-pizer-ll-credit-lucas_small Using religion to discriminate against LGBTQ people - part 8 of a series

April 1, 2021 — There are some religious people, congregations, and religions that support LGBTQ people.  In the Episcopal Church, Bishop Gene Robinson was the first openly gay Bishop — but his consecration led to a worldwide split in the church over the issue of homosexuality.  In New York City, Congregation Beit Simchat Torah is an LGBTQ-welcoming synagogue with an openly gay leader, Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum.  Both Bishop Gene and Rabbi Kleinbaum were guests on earlier editions of OutCasting; you can listen to their interviews at OutCastingMedia.org.

But historically, many religions have condemned LGBTQ people.  The Catholic church has described homosexuality as an “intrinsic disorder” and encouraged people to “condemn the sin, not the sinner” — as if people can just rip sexuality out of their lives without inflicting great harm.  Any number of religious counselors continue to practice conversion or reparative therapy to “cure” people of being gay even as a growing number of states, and even some other countries, recognize that this “treatment” is ineffective and potentially dangerous.  We did a series in early 2020 on conversion therapy; it’s also available at OutCastingMedia.org.

(STATIONS:  The conversion therapy series is available here on PRX.  We can make the earlier interviews with Bishop Gene and Rabbi Kleinbaum available for broadcast on request.)

As the law is catching up with growing public acceptance of LGBTQ people and as we have secured a number of important civil rights, there’s a movement determined to put us firmly back in our place, as they would have it.  Cakeshops and florists claim that they’re entitled to deny their services to us because they say that providing services to LGBTQ people would violate their “religious liberty.”  This discrimination would never be seen as legitimate if it were directed at any other minority group.  Just imagine it — a shop owner says: “My religious liberty prevents me from serving Black people, or Jewish people, so go away.”  It’s unthinkable that that would be seen as acceptable in today’s world.  And of course, there are businesses where the stakes would be much higher if it becomes the law that businesses can just turn away LGBTQ people based on a religious objection.

So is there any legitimacy when a business owner cites “religious liberty” to justify denying service to LGBTQ people?  What are the contours of religious liberty?  What’s supposed to happen when someone, citing religious liberty, discriminates against LGBTQ people, thus denying their equality?  What does “equality” mean in the United States?  Does one take precedence over the other when they come into conflict?

Joining us to delve into this issue is Jennifer C. Pizer.  Jenny is the Senior Counsel and Director of Law and Policy for Lambda Legal, the country's oldest and largest legal organization seeking full recognition of the civil rights of LGBT people and everyone living with HIV.

This is the eighth part of our in-depth conversation with Jennifer C. Pizer of Lambda Legal about how claims of religious liberty are being weaponized to justify discrimination against LGBTQ people.  If you’ve missed any of the series, you can listen on our web site, OutCastingMedia.org.

The interviews that make up this series were recorded in August and September 2020, when the Trump administration was still in power and before the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

In the previous parts of this series, Jenny and OutCaster Lucas have talked about how changes on the Supreme Court can affect the evolution of the Court’s jurisprudence.  The death last fall of Ginsburg, a liberal, and her rapid replacement by Amy Coney Barrett, a self-described religious conservative, shifted the Court to the right, not likely to be a good thing for the ongoing fight for LGBTQ equality.

Jenny and Lucas have also discussed a number of the Supreme Court’s major religious liberty cases in the past several years, including Hobby Lobby in 2014 and two cases from 2020, Our Lady of Guadalupe and Little Sisters of the Poor.  Taken together, these cases have indicated a disturbing shift on the Court toward respecting religious liberty at the expense of other protected interests -- again, not a good thing for LGBTQ equality because much of the discrimination our community faces is based on religion.

In this episode, Jenny and Lucas explore the Supreme Court's reasoning in its major decisions on religious liberty and LGBTQ equality and the interaction between those rights, which are increasingly at odds with each other.  They talk about the Masterpiece Cakeshop case, which dealt with anti-LGBTQ discrimination in a relatively trivial setting, and how dangerous it could be if the Court allows discrimination in situations in which the stakes are higher.  They talk about the fact that a lot of discrimination against LGBTQ people happens outside of the public eye so the public is generally unaware of it, the fact that we don't have anti-discrimination protections in about half the states, and the urgent need for the Equality Act, an amendment of the federal Civil Rights Act that would add national protections for LGBTQ people.  The Equality Act has passed in the House but faces an uncertain future in the Senate.

August 2021 -- The male gaze and performative bisexuality

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting Overtime series | 07:29

Real-world consequences for the media's objectification of women

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 August 1, 2021 -- The media objectify women.  There's nothing new about that.  But there are real-world consequences for women, and as OutCaster Isha notes, these consequences can be particularly pronounced -- and even potentially dangerous -- for LGBTQ women.

OutCasting 0089 -- Using religion to discriminate against LGBTQ people -- part 14 of an in-depth exploration

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

The Fulton case: The Supreme Court unanimously agrees with a Catholic adoption agency’s claim of religious liberty claim to justify discrimination. Aren’t the Court’s liberal justices supposed to support LGBTQ equality? Or is there more to the ruling than is readily apparent?

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Using religion to discriminate against LGBTQ people - part 14 of an in-depth exploration

October 1, 2021 -- There are some religious people, congregations, and religions that support LGBTQ people.  In the Episcopal Church, Bishop Gene Robinson was the first openly gay Bishop -- but his consecration led to a worldwide split in the church over the issue of homosexuality.  In New York City, Congregation Beit Simchat Torah is an LGBTQ-welcoming synagogue with an openly gay leader, Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum.  Both Bishop Gene and Rabbi Kleinbaum were guests on earlier editions of OutCasting; you can listen to their interviews at OutCastingMedia.org.

But historically, many religions have condemned LGBTQ people.  The Catholic church has described homosexuality as an "intrinsic disorder" and encouraged people to "condemn the sin, not the sinner" -- as if people can just rip sexuality out of their lives without inflicting great harm.  Any number of religious counselors continue to practice conversion or reparative therapy to "cure" people of being gay even as a growing number of states, and even some other countries, recognize that this "treatment" is ineffective and potentially dangerous.  We did a series in early 2020 on conversion therapy; it’s also available at OutCastingMedia.org.

(STATIONS:  The conversion therapy series is available here on PRX.  We can make the earlier interviews with Bishop Gene and Rabbi Kleinbaum available for broadcast on request.)

As the law is catching up with growing public acceptance of LGBTQ people and as we have secured a number of important civil rights, there's a movement determined to put us firmly back in our place, as they would have it.  Cakeshops and florists claim that they're entitled to deny their services to us because they say that providing services to LGBTQ people would violate their religious liberty.  This discrimination would never be seen as legitimate if it were directed at any other minority group.  Just imagine it -- a shop owner says:  "My religious liberty prevents me from serving Black people, or Jewish people, so go away."  It's unthinkable that that would be seen as acceptable in today's world.  And of course, there are businesses where the stakes would be much higher if it becomes the law that businesses can just turn away LGBTQ people based on a religious objection.

So is there any legitimacy when a business owner cites religious liberty to justify denying service to LGBTQ people?  What are the contours of religious liberty?  What's supposed to happen when someone, citing religious liberty, discriminates against LGBTQ people, thus denying their equality?  What does "equality" mean in the United States?  Does one take precedence over the other when they come into conflict?

Joining us to delve into this issue is Jennifer C. Pizer.  Jenny is the Senior Counsel and Director of Law and Policy for Lambda Legal, the country's oldest and largest legal organization seeking full recognition of the civil rights of LGBT people and everyone living with HIV. 

In this episode, Jenny and Isha continue their conversation about the case of Fulton v. City of Philadelphia, decided by the Supreme Court in June 2021, in which a Catholic adoption agency pressed a religious freedom claim to "opt out" of the city's nondiscrimination rules.

OutCasting 0090 -- Using religion to discriminate against LGBTQ people -- part 15 of an in-depth exploration

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

The wall between church and state has been eroded. What will it take to rebuild it? And what’s the role of the Supreme Court and its newest justice, Amy Coney Barrett?

0086-jenny-isha-240_small IN THIS EDITION
Jenny and Isha continue their conversation about religious liberty and how it can conflict with another constitutional guarantee, equality.  Rebuilding the eroded wall between church and state; envisioning the legal approach of the newest Supreme Court justice, Amy Coney Barrett, on religious liberty and LGBTQ issues; examining the Court’s approaches to abortion and Covid through the lens of religious liberty; and the gap between reality and the ideals that the United States is supposed to represent.

November 1, 2021 -- There are some religious people, congregations, and religions that support LGBTQ people.  In the Episcopal Church, Bishop Gene Robinson was the first openly gay Bishop -- but his consecration led to a worldwide split in the church over the issue of homosexuality.  In New York City, Congregation Beit Simchat Torah is an LGBTQ-welcoming synagogue with an openly gay leader, Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum.  Both Bishop Gene and Rabbi Kleinbaum were guests on earlier editions of OutCasting; you can listen to their interviews at OutCastingMedia.org.

But historically, many religions have condemned LGBTQ people.  The Catholic church has described homosexuality as an "intrinsic disorder" and encouraged people to "condemn the sin, not the sinner" -- as if people can just rip sexuality out of their lives without inflicting great harm.  Any number of religious counselors continue to practice conversion or reparative therapy to "cure" people of being gay even as a growing number of states, and even some other countries, recognize that this "treatment" is ineffective and potentially dangerous.  We did a series in early 2020 on conversion therapy; it’s also available at OutCastingMedia.org.

(STATIONS:  The conversion therapy series is available here on PRX.  We can make the earlier interviews with Bishop Gene and Rabbi Kleinbaum available for broadcast on request.)

As the law is catching up with growing public acceptance of LGBTQ people and as we have secured a number of important civil rights, there's a movement determined to put us firmly back in our place, as they would have it.  Cakeshops and florists claim that they're entitled to deny their services to us because they say that providing services to LGBTQ people would violate their religious liberty.  This discrimination would never be seen as legitimate if it were directed at any other minority group.  Just imagine it -- a shop owner says:  "My religious liberty prevents me from serving Black people, or Jewish people, so go away."  It's unthinkable that that would be seen as acceptable in today's world.  And of course, there are businesses where the stakes would be much higher if it becomes the law that businesses can just turn away LGBTQ people based on a religious objection.

So is there any legitimacy when a business owner cites religious liberty to justify denying service to LGBTQ people?  What are the contours of religious liberty?  What's supposed to happen when someone, citing religious liberty, discriminates against LGBTQ people, thus denying their equality?  What does "equality" mean in the United States?  Does one take precedence over the other when they come into conflict?

Joining us to delve into this issue is Jennifer C. Pizer.  Jenny is the Senior Counsel and Director of Law and Policy for Lambda Legal, the country's oldest and largest legal organization seeking full recognition of the civil rights of LGBT people and everyone living with HIV. 

OutCasting 0091 -- Using religion to discriminate against LGBTQ people -- part 16 of an in-depth exploration

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting series | 29:00

The bill of rights and the vehemence of Justices Thomas and Alito on religious liberty vs. LGBTQ equality.

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IN THIS EDITION

Our guest, the eminent civil rights lawyer Jennifer C. Pizer, and OutCaster Isha continue their conversation about religious liberty and how it can conflict with another constitutional guarantee, equality.  The conversation this month includes a discussion about the bill of rights, the roles of the courts and the legislative process, and the angry and perhaps even unjudicial vehemence of Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito on how religious liberty should override LGBTQ people’s rights to equality.  Did Roe v. Wade decide the abortion issue too soon?  What about marriage equality – should it have been secured through legislation instead of the courts?

 

December 1, 2021 -- There are some religious people, congregations, and religions that support LGBTQ people.  In the Episcopal Church, Bishop Gene Robinson was the first openly gay Bishop -- but his consecration led to a worldwide split in the church over the issue of homosexuality.  In New York City, Congregation Beit Simchat Torah is an LGBTQ-welcoming synagogue with an openly gay leader, Rabbi Sharon Kleinbaum.  Both Bishop Gene and Rabbi Kleinbaum were guests on earlier editions of OutCasting; you can listen to their interviews at OutCastingMedia.org.

But historically, many religions have condemned LGBTQ people.  The Catholic church has described homosexuality as an "intrinsic disorder" and encouraged people to "condemn the sin, not the sinner" -- as if people can just rip sexuality out of their lives without inflicting great harm.  Any number of religious counselors continue to practice conversion or reparative therapy to "cure" people of being gay even as a growing number of states, and even some other countries, recognize that this "treatment" is ineffective and potentially dangerous.  We did a series in early 2020 on conversion therapy; it’s also available at OutCastingMedia.org.

(STATIONS:  The conversion therapy series is available here on PRX.  We can make the earlier interviews with Bishop Gene and Rabbi Kleinbaum available for broadcast on request.)

As the law is catching up with growing public acceptance of LGBTQ people and as we have secured a number of important civil rights, there's a movement determined to put us firmly back in our place, as they would have it.  Cakeshops and florists claim that they're entitled to deny their services to us because they say that providing services to LGBTQ people would violate their religious liberty.  This discrimination would never be seen as legitimate if it were directed at any other minority group.  Just imagine it -- a shop owner says:  "My religious liberty prevents me from serving Black people, or Jewish people, so go away."  It's unthinkable that that would be seen as acceptable in today's world.  And of course, there are businesses where the stakes would be much higher if it becomes the law that businesses can just turn away LGBTQ people based on a religious objection.

So is there any legitimacy when a business owner cites religious liberty to justify denying service to LGBTQ people?  What are the contours of religious liberty?  What's supposed to happen when someone, citing religious liberty, discriminates against LGBTQ people, thus denying their equality?  What does "equality" mean in the United States?  Does one take precedence over the other when they come into conflict?

Joining us to delve into this issue is Jennifer C. Pizer.  Jenny is the Senior Counsel and Director of Law and Policy for Lambda Legal, the country's oldest and largest legal organization seeking full recognition of the civil rights of LGBT people and everyone living with HIV. 

“The most wonderful time of the year!”

From Media for the Public Good, Inc. - OutCasting Media | Part of the OutCasting Overtime series | 07:03

The OutCasting team reflects on how the holidays can be stressful and even excruciating for LGBTQ teenagers.

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December 1, 2021 -- It’s the holidays, a time when extended families often get together, a time when well-meaning relatives who haven’t seen you for a while might ask, “So – are you seeing anyone?”

Straight, cisgender teenagers might find the situation awkward – or maybe not.  Maybe they’re in a new relationship and they can’t wait to talk about it.

But if you’re young and LGBTQ, that seemingly innocent question can open up a minefield.  What if you’re out only to your immediate family?  Do you want to be put on the spot like that?  Do your parents think you should “just not mention it”?  Will they blame you if there’s a big blowup?  Even worse:  What if you’re not out at all?

Sarah shares the thoughts of the OutCasting team.