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Playlist: SPECIALS

Compiled By: Tina Renick

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Episode 16: Lessons in Landslides

From PRX | Part of the Orbital Path series | 22:09

Space science can help track what’s happening on Earth. In this episode, Orbital Path talks landslides and the satellites that monitor them for the third anniversary of the deadliest landslide in US history.

On March 22, 2014 a 650-foot hillside collapsed and covered the community of Oso, Washington. Forty-three people died. Hear from scientists working to investigate this landslide and predict future ones, as well as a woman who witnessed the landslide.

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David Montgomery studied the Oso landslide’s remains as part of the ‘Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance’ (GEER) team that investigated the landslide and tried to pinpoint the causes that lead to the Oso landslide.

Dr. Dalia Kirschbaum, of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, studies landslides from space using satellites to create various models. Her goal is to develop a model that can be used as the foundation for a global landslide predicting software that can help keep people living in wet, mountainous regions safe from the slides.

And Asheley Bryson is the manager at the Darrington Sno-Isles Library, which is just a few miles from the site of the landslide. She shares her memories from that day.

JWST is ready for launch and amazing science

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Three astronomers share what they hope the James Webb Space Telescope will reveal about our universe after its launch this month.

Jwst_prep_for_tranport_nasa_chris_gunn_small_small The James Webb Space Telescope will begin its mission of discovery as soon as Dec. 24. René Doyon, Heidi Hammel and Mike McElwain join us for a conversation about what it may reveal from our solar system to the edge of the universe. Doyon is principal investigator for the telescope’s NIRISS imaging spectrograph, Hammel is vice president for science at the Association of University for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and McElwain of the Goddard Space Flight Center is the JWST Observatory project scientist. What do chief scientist Bruce Betts and a horse have in common? Find out in the What’s Up space trivia contest. There’s always more to hear and explore at https://www.planetary.org/planetary-radio/2021-jwst-pre-launch-rene-doyon-heidi-hammel-mike-mcelwain

No-No Boy

From L.A. Theatre Works | Part of the L.A. Theatre Works series | 01:58:02

After World War 2, a Japanese-American draft resister tries to find his way

Nnb-digital-cover-r1v1_small Ken Narasaki's adaptation of the novel by Japanese-American author John Okada is set during the aftermath of the U.S. government's incarceration of 120,000 people of Japanese descent during World War II, and the resettlement of Japanese Americans to the West Coast. In the play, Ichiro returns to Seattle, where he struggles to transition into post-war life.

No-No Boy is sponsored in part by the California Civil Liberties Program from the California State Library.

Directed by Anna Lyse Erikson
Producing Director: Susan Albert Loewenberg
Kurt Kanazawa as Taro
Emily Kuroda as Mrs. Kanno, Mrs. Kumasaka
John Miyasaki as Freddie, Voice 3, Radio DJ
Ken Narasaki as Kenji, Kumasaka-san, Voice 1, Judge
Sharon Omi as Ma
Joy Osmanski as Emi, 2A
Sab Shimono as Pa
Greg Watanabe as Ichiro
Paul Yen as Eto, Jun, Cop, Voice 2, Drunk Guy

TALK MUSIC WITH ME: Jimmy Carter-Rock 'n' Roll President Documentary

From Paul Ingles | Part of the Talk Music With Me series | 58:59

We talk with music documentary director Mary Wharton and writer Bill Flanagan. They’ve collaborated with others to create the documentary we’re spotlighting today called JIMMY CARTER, ROCK AND ROLL PRESIDENT... which looks at how the 39th president’s fondness for music of all kinds really helped drive his successful campaign for president in 1976 and also was in evidence during his presidency as he hosted many great musicians at the White House.

Cartermovieimage_small We talk with music documentary director Mary Wharton and writer Bill Flanagan.  They’ve collaborated with others to create the documentary we’re spotlighting today called JIMMY CARTER, ROCK AND ROLL PRESIDENT... which looks at how the 39th president’s fondness for music of all kinds really helped drive his successful campaign for president in 1976 and also was in evidence during his presidency as he hosted many great musicians at the White House. 

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Subsurface granite on the Moon? The anatomy of a lunar hot spot

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

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A decades-old lunar mystery gets an update in this week's Planetary Radio. Matt Siegler from the Planetary Science Institute shares his team's surprising findings about the granite formation that might lie beneath Compton-Belkovich, a thorium-rich hot spot on the far side of the Moon. Then Bruce Betts, chief scientist of The Planetary Society, shares What's Up in the night sky.


Discover more at: https://www.planetary.org/planetary-radio/2023-subsurface-granite-on-the-moon

L.A. Theatre Works (Series)

Produced by L.A. Theatre Works

Most recent piece in this series:

A Tale of Charles Dickens

From L.A. Theatre Works | Part of the L.A. Theatre Works series | 01:58:00

A_tale_of_charles_dickens_artwork_small The setting is London in the 1830’s—the most colorful and chaotic city in the world—and young journalist Charles Dickens is uncovering a dark conspiracy of arson and murder. Inspired by the playwright’s visit to Dickens’ house in London, this epic tale imagines a fictional episode in the life of the young Dickens, when he was working as a reporter for London’s “Morning Chronicle.” The performance is a co-production with the award-winning Antaeus Theatre Company, with sixteen actors portraying more than one hundred and thirty characters.

A Tale of Charles Dickens by Paul Lazarus and Janet Dulin Jones, directed by Paul Lazarus.

Producing Director: Susan Albert Loewenberg

Starring, in alphabetical order:

John Apicella, Anne Gee Byrd, Jane Carr, Josh Clark, Angela Goethals, Bruce Green, Joy Jacobson, Michael Kirby, Jeremy Lawrence, Bill Mendieta, Rebecca Mozo, John Prosky, John Sloan, Devon Sorvari, Janellen Steininger, and Peter Van Norden.

Recorded before a live audience at the Skirball Cultural Center, Los Angeles in October 2005.




The Children's Hour (Series)

Produced by The Children's Hour Inc.

Most recent piece in this series:

Protecting Earth

From The Children's Hour Inc. | Part of the The Children's Hour series | 58:00

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This time on The Children's Hour, we wanted to learn more about how National Parks and Wilderness areas are made. 2024 is the 100th anniversary of the Gila Wilderness Area which was the very first wilderness protected by the US Federal Government. Our first guest represents New Mexico's third Congressional district, and has legislation to add another Wilderness area to the national map. Representative Teresa Leger Fernandez explains the process to create National Parks and National Wilderness Areas, and describes how the community is involved. 

 

Congresswoman Leger Fernandez is also working to restore the Every Child Outdoors initiative, a program that will allow all US fourth graders a free pass for all National Parks, Wilderness Areas, Monuments, and Historic Sites. She explains how children can have real impact on influencing their representatives by writing hand-written notes to urge Congress to protect the Earth, or any other topic you care about. The Congresswoman told us that every letter written by a child is read, and makes a difference.

 

Our Kids Crew member Evan D has another way to get outdoors and into these special places. Evan is a Junior Ranger, a program that gives kids badges at each site to encourage kids to learn more about where they are visiting. The Junior Ranger program is open for kids ages 5 to 13 and gives families even more reasons to include visits to National Monuments, Parks, Wilderness Areas, Wildlife Refuges and Historic Sites. 

 

Evan got his first badge at Aztec Ruins National Monument, which is located in north western New Mexico. Aztec Ruins is one of the many Chacoan era archaeological sites that has been preserved as a National Monument. People lived all over the United States for thousands of years, but in the desert Southwestern United States, some of the original structures people made have endured. It's important to remember that the people whose ancestors made the Aztec Ruins, and other sites, remain among us today.

 

We also meet biologists and authors, Lily and Barbara Kingsolver. Their first book for children, Coyote's Wild Home tells about a young coyote pup learning the skills needed for growing up. Lily and Barbara explain how they learned so much about coyotes, and why telling this story is so important to them.  

 

We hope you get inspired get into nature this Earth Day and explore the world where you live.

 

This episode was produced by Senior Producer Christina Stella and Executive Producer Katie Stone with help from Education Director Lorraine Archibald. Chad Scheer was our recording engineer at Outpost.

 

© 2024 The Children's Hour Inc, All Rights Reserved

Art Works (Series)

Produced by National Endowment for the Arts

Most recent piece in this series:

Bassist Dave Holland and his Life in Jazz

From National Endowment for the Arts | Part of the Art Works series | 28:52

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As we’re gearing up for the 2024 NEA Jazz Masters’ tribute concert, we are revisiting my conversation with 2017 NEA Jazz Master Bassist Dave Holland. From his roots in the English working class to becoming an admired figure in the jazz world, Holland shares his musical journey, marked by a deep passion for the bass, a transformative stint with Miles Davis, and a dedication to the next generation of jazz musicians. Dave Holland discusses his initial attraction to music through the ukulele and his evolution towards the bass guitar--captivated by its rhythmic and harmonic significance and reveals how exposure to American rock, R&B, and jazz icons like Ray Brown and Leroy Vinnegar steered him towards jazz and led to his lifelong dedication to the upright bass. Holland recounts the serendipitous offer to join Miles Davis's band, a pivotal moment that introduced him to the international jazz stage and talks about his transition from band member to bandleader and composer, focusing on the necessity of dialogue and personal expression within music and the challenges and rewards of solo bass performances. Holland also discusses his educational work, aiming to connect students with jazz's rich heritage and guiding them to find their own voices within the tradition and finally reflects on his career's progression, underscoring the collaborative nature of jazz and its capacity to unify musicians across diverse backgrounds.

 

 

*The Arts Endowment in collaboration with the Kennedy Center will celebrate the 2024 NEA Jazz Masters  with a free tribute concert on Saturday, April 13 at 7:30 pm. The concert is free and open to the public. You can get ticket details at Kennedy-Center.org. And if you can’t make it to DC, don’t despair, the concert is available through a live webcast at arts.gov

NYP 23-11: The New York Philharmonic This Week!, 11/30/2022

From The WFMT Radio Network | Part of the The New York Philharmonic This Week series | 01:58:30

Music Director Jaap van Zweden conducts selections from Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet Suites Nos. 1 and 2, followed by Tchaikovsky’s melody-rich Symphony No. 5.

Nyp_logo_red_rgb_large_small Music Director Jaap van Zweden conducts selections from Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet Suites Nos. 1 and 2, followed by Tchaikovsky’s melody-rich Symphony No. 5.

Toasty winter treats with Earth Eats

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats: Specials series | 54:00

A winter holiday special with chestnuts roasting, cookies baking and coffee outside.

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“I love cookies. They’re hands-on,there’s a lot of technique involved in them,  they’re really fun and easy to do with kids,  they bake quickly,they’re perfect for gift giving any time of year, and they’re great. 

A winter holiday Earth Eats special with Kayte Young. 

We drop in on a cookie baking workshop with kids at a food pantry, we enjoy a hot cup of coffee on a chilly bike ride, and we toast up a batch of maple granola for holiday gift giving. 

All that, plus CHESTNUTS, on this special episode of Earth Eats.


1359: The Negotiators , 12/1/2022

From Snap Judgment | Part of the Snap Judgment Weekly series | 53:57

This week on Snap Judgment, we drop into the world of a foreign negotiator as he attempts to free an American journalist being held hostage. And we travel through time to remove a classic painting from a woman’s world for reasons that only become clear as her story unfolds.

Thenegotiators-sq_small This week on Snap Judgment, we drop into the world of a foreign negotiator as he attempts to free an American journalist being held hostage. And we travel through time to remove a classic painting from a woman’s world for reasons that only become clear as her story unfolds. Snap Judgment presents, “The Negotiators.” Stories of give and take that go beyond reaching a desired outcome.

 

Brazen Presents: Dynamite Doug

From PRX | Part of the Brazen Presents series | 51:53

How one man carried out the greatest art heist in history – the looting of Cambodia’s entire cultural heritage – with the aid of Western academics, dealers and curators. This is the story the art world doesn’t want told.

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For 50 years, Douglas Latchford was the world’s premier expert on Cambodian art, supplying priceless statues to Western museums and rich collectors. But his fame masked a dirty secret. Douglas had colluded with the Khmer Rouge, a genocidal regime, to loot Cambodia’s entire cultural heritage. As the country descended into bloodshed, Douglas stole almost everything. A network of art world cronies were on hand to help him sell these blood statues, including a senior curator at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. When a band of art sleuths get on their case, Douglas and his co-conspirators mount a rearguard action to save themselves. This is a story the art world doesn’t want told. Unlike the Elgin Marbles, and other brewing controversies over stolen art, our story isn’t ancient history. This tale is happening now. 


www.dynamitedoug.com

23-26: Musical Stars and Cultural Stripes: American Roots Independence Day Revisited, 6/28/2023

From American Routes | Part of the American Routes series | 01:59:01

with the Staple Singers, Tito Puente, Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys, New Orleans Tuxedo Brass and more.

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It's Fourth of July, and we dig into the archives for the roots of American Routes. It all began with a series of Independence Day concerts held annually at the Washington Monument before the fireworks show on the National Mall and featured the best of American vernacular musical culture. We’ll sample from nearly a decade’s worth of concerts, highlighting spectacular stage performances by the Staple Singers, Tito Puente, Steve Riley and the Mamou Playboys, New Orleans Tuxedo Brass and more. It's Musical Stars & Cultural Stripes: American Roots Independence Day Revisited.

Conspiracy Bites: Who Is Behind What We Eat?

From Mateo Schimpf | 59:00

From the dinner table to the dark web.

Osg_podart_600x600_small Concerns about a 'global elite' exerting control over demographic shifts and our food choices have hit the mainstream, and they are feeding anxieties. This week, Ray Suarez speaks with French legal scholar Rim-Sarah Alouane about the "great replacement theory", and what it takes to be considered “French first.” Then, Laicie Heeley, Executive Producer and Host of “Things That Go Boom”, explains how cracks in our food supply chain have paved the way for international conspiracy theories.

The Highest Office (hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 53:59

When Colin Rafferty moved to Virginia in 2008 he didn’t know much about the presidents, so he set out to read a biography of each one.

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When Colin Rafferty moved to Virginia in 2008 he didn’t know much about the presidents, so he set out to read a biography of each one. What began as a personal project eventually turned into his new publication - a collection of experimental, genre-bending essays on every U.S. president. Also: In 2016, Eric Drummond Smith guest-curated an art exhibit called The Cherry Bounce Show at the William King Museum in Abingdon, VA. He called on artists from all over Appalachia to create modern artwork, with one small stipulation… every piece had to be inspired by a presidential election.

Later in the show: In grade school, many of us learned how the founding fathers carefully defined the office of the presidency. But Nathaniel Green argues that the presidency was shaped by ordinary people, not the political elite. Plus: Loaded with humor and biting satire, political cartoons have a long history of holding people in power to account. What makes political cartoons so effective? Fran Hassencahl says the answer lies in the magic of visual metaphors.