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Playlist: KRCB-FM Radio 91 @ norcalpublicmedia.org/radio/radio

Compiled By: KRCB-FM "Radio 91"

Caption: PRX default Playlist image

Reveal
This American Life
American Routes
Afropop Worldwide
Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio
The Retro Cocktail Hour
Folk Alley
Hearts of Space
Notes from the Jazz Underground
Strange Currency
Deep Threes
Snap Judgment
Latino USA

What KRCB FM Radio 91 is playing

Vaping: What You Don't Know Can Kill You - Hour Special

From KRCB-FM "Radio 91" | Part of the Vaping: What You Don't Know Can Kill You series | 01:05:51

We investigate the dangers of vaping, while listening to the voices of high school administrators, health professionals and students. One thing is clear: most young people are unaware of the short and long-term health impacts of vaping.

Vape-media-defense-gov-small_small In the summer of 2019, troubling reports circulated throughout the country that people were being injured and dying after vaping, usually connected to black market THC products. More information surfaced in November of 2019 that a key cause of these injuires and deaths was a substance called Vitamin E acetate.
But the timing of this epidemic also turned a spotlight on the broader question of how vaping companies, aided by Big Tobacco, were trying to hook a new generation on nicotine, by making vaping seem like a safe, candy-coated alternative to cigarettes. We now know that this isn't the case. Vaping nicotine is dangerous for young people, and we learn why in talking with health officials, high school administrators and kids themselves. 
Program is updated at the end before credits with a postscript about new vaping regulations that occurred "early in 2020."

A Conversation with Stacey Abrams

From KRCB-FM "Radio 91" | 59:00

Northern California Public Media's Adia White interviews Stacey Abrams at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts, Santa Rosa, California, May 20, 2019.

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Stacey Abrams was the first black woman to be nominated by a major party to run for governor.  She narrowly lost that race in Georgia last year but received more votes than any other Democrat who has run statewide there. Abrams writes about daring to dream big and following those ambitions to fruition in her book, "Lead From the Outside."  KRCB's Adia White interviewed Abrams about her book on stage at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts in Santa Rosa on May 20, 2019. 

Photo: Northern California Public Media reporter Adia White interviews Stacey Abrams at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts on May 20, 2019.  Credit: Steve Jennings

Show notes: Audio was recorded live at the Luther Burbank Center on May 20, 2019. It includes an intro by KRCB host Mark Prell.

A news hole is available upon request. Please contact Adia_White@norcalpublicmedia.org

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2021-10-22 What’s on Tap at COP26 in Glasgow

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 59:00

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Host: Greg Dalton


Guests:

Kate Larsen, Director, International Energy & Climate, Rhodium Group

Albert Cheung, Head of Global Analysis, Bloomberg NEF

Mitzi Jonelle Tan, Climate Justice Activist, Youth Advocates for Climate Action Philippines

Carlon Zackhras, Marshall Islands youth climate activist


In a couple weeks, delegates from around the world are set to convene in Glasgow at the international climate summit known as COP26 ideally to hammer out commitments to reduce carbon emissions in hopes of avoiding the worst impacts of climate disruption. 


Kate Larsen, a director at the research firm Rhodium Group, says the meeting will demonstrate whether voluntary commitments under the Paris agreement are working, and whether countries are willing and able to make additional commitments to reduce emissions even further in the 2030 timeline.  


“Are countries hearing the science and the activists and watching what industry is doing? And are they taking that next step in a serious way?”


Larsen says while these climate negotiations no longer require countries to come together to write treaty agreements, there is still significant pressure for leaders to demonstrate they are taking action toward a net zero future not just by midcentury as most have promised, but concrete steps they will take in the next decade. 


“And so, you'll see some heads of states and other leaders twisting each other's arms to try to go even further,” Larsen says.


Albert Cheung, London-based head of global analysis for the research firm BloombergNEF, says it’s important that the U.S. is back at the climate table this year, after withdrawing from the Paris agreement under President Trump. 


We can’t get anyone near global net zero without the U.S. taking real action.  And I think it matters as well because the developing world won’t act if the rich world doesn’t.” However, Cheung adds that the U.S. has not demonstrated itself to be a constant climate actor in the past, and this year its role may be a bit less important.


“In the intervening four years while the U.S. was absent, a lot changed.  A lot of other countries and regions: China, Japan, Korea, Europe all pledged to get to net zero.  They’re all looking at policies and how to get there.”


China has pledged to be net zero by 2060 ten years later than most countries and the U.S. and most of the world would like to see China do more. But Cheung says China’s recent pledge to stop financing overseas coal is a significant step, and demonstrates that President Xi Jinping is responsive to the global climate discussion. 


There’s been increasing pressure on organizers of COP26 to ensure fair and equitable representation of countries in the Global South particularly those already facing climate impacts who will continue to suffer as the world tries to slow the effects of fossil-fuel-driven climate disruption. 


Mitzi Jonelle Tan is a full-time climate justice activist based in the Philippines. 

“How do you expect to have a climate conference where you have climate policies being decided on by people who have never seen or even faced any semblance of the climate crisis?” she says. “And that’s why it’s so important that we have people from the most affected areas in these climate negotiations. And then going beyond representation, it's not just about having people there but listening to people who are there. Making sure that the changes that happen are because of the people who are most affected because it's been way too long...emissions are still rising, people are still suffering.” 


She and others want to see countries from the Global North take responsibility for their emissions. 


“Climate finance isn't help; it’s reparations. They caused this, they have to pay. They have the climate debt to the Global South and to humanity.”


While she’s hopeful for some strong commitments and pledges at COP26, she says climate justice is a continuous process that doesn’t start or end at that conference.  


Related Links:


COP26 Climate Summit


Youth Advocates for Climate Action Philippines


America Is All In, report from Bloomberg Philanthropies

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

743: Mississippi Goddam Chapter 2: The Aftermath, 10/23/2021

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | 59:00

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On the morning of Billey Joe Johnson’s death, crime scene tape separates the Johnsons from their son’s body. Their shaky faith in the criminal justice system begins to buckle.


As Billey Joe Johnson’s family tries to get answers about his death, they get increasingly frustrated with the investigation. They feel that law enforcement, from the lead investigator to the district attorney, are keeping them out of the loop. While a majority White grand jury rules that Johnson’s’s death was accidental, members of the family believe the possibility of foul play was never properly investigated.

Folk Alley (Series)

Produced by FreshGrass Foundation

Most recent piece in this series:

Folk Alley Episode #211021

From FreshGrass Foundation | Part of the Folk Alley series | 01:58:02

Folk_alley_radio_show_logo_240_191026__small This week on Folk Alley we remember to great Paddy Moloney - founder of the legendary Irish group, The Chieftains - who passed away on October11; more music from Ireland by Cathy Jordan & Seamie O'Dowd and Dave Curley; some spooky tunes for Halloween from Gabrielle Louise, Buddy & Julie Miller, and Gretchen Peters; plus new music from Sean McConnell, Jamestown Revival, and more.

In hour two, an advance single from John Mellencamp's forthcoming 2022 release featuring Bruce Springsteen; more new music from Jordan Tice, Margo Cilker, Buffalo Nichols, and Billy Strings; plus favorites from Taj Mahal, Anjimile, Rhiannon Giddens w/ Francesco Turrisi, Jeffrey Martin, and much more.

The Retro Cocktail Hour (Series)

Produced by Kansas Public Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

The Retro Cocktail Hour #923

From Kansas Public Radio | Part of the The Retro Cocktail Hour series | 01:58:00

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The music is served "shaken, not stirred" every week on The Retro Cocktail Hour.  Here you'll find vintage recordings from the dawn of the Hi-Fi Era - imaginative, light-hearted (and sometimes light headed) pop stylings designed to underscore everything from the backyard barbecue to the high-tech bachelor pad. 
Among the artists featured on The Retro Cocktail Hour are lounge legends like Frank Sinatra and Juan Esquivel; tiki gods Martin Denny and Les Baxter; swinging cocktail combos featuring The Three Suns and Jack "Mr. Bongo" Costanzo; and mambo king Perez Prado.  The series also spotlights up and coming lounge/exotica artists, including Waitiki, Ixtahuele, the Tikiyaki Orchestra, Big Kahuna and the Copa Cat Pack, the Voodoo Organist and many more.
Each hour of the show is discrete and can be used in a variety of ways - a weekly two-hour show; a weekly one-hour show; or twice weekly one-hour shows.  Custom promos and fundraising pitches available on request.
Join host Darrell Brogdon at the underground martini bunker for the sounds of space age pop and incredibly strange music!

Notes from the Jazz Underground (Series)

Produced by WDCB

Most recent piece in this series:

Notes from the Jazz Underground #140

From WDCB | Part of the Notes from the Jazz Underground series | 58:10

Nftju_logo_small_small this week is a look at some of the odder projects that Pat Metheny has been a part of through the years, including his latest ensemble, Pat Metheny's Side-Eye.

Bioneers - Revolution From the Heart of Nature (Series)

Produced by Bioneers

Most recent piece in this series:

13-14: Inalienable: Belonging to the Earth Community, 10/27/2021

From Bioneers | Part of the Bioneers - Revolution From the Heart of Nature series | 28:30

Macy_joanna_small Deep Ecology extends an inalienable right to life to all beings. Yet as the naturalist Aldo Leopold observed, “One of the penalties of an ecological education is that one lives alone in a world of wounds.” Either harden your shell, or be a doctor. Joanna Macy decided to be an Earth doctor. A systems theorist, author and lifelong activist, she describes how healing the world and healing your heart and soul go hand in hand.

Strange Currency (Series)

Produced by KMUW

Most recent piece in this series:

Strange Currency 10.22.21: Mr. Luck

From KMUW | Part of the Strange Currency series | 01:53:58

Sc_square_small Mr. Luck: A Tribute To Jimmy Reed is the latest release from Rolling Stones guitarist Ron Wood. The record also features guest appearances from Wood’s predecessor in the Rolling Stones, Mick Taylor. Plus music from Paul McCartney, Junior Wells, and others.

Art of the Song (Series)

Produced by Art of the Song

Most recent piece in this series:

Jonatha Brooke

From Art of the Song | Part of the Art of the Song series | 59:00

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This week on Art of the Song our guest is Jonatha Brooke. Jonatha has been writing songs, making records, and touring since the early 90's. After four major label releases, she started her own independent label in 1999 and has since released eight more albums. 

Jonatha has co-written songs with Katy Perry and the late Joe Sample among others. In 2014, she debuted her one woman musical and companion album My Mother Has Four Noses at the Duke Theater in New York City. We spoke with Jonatha about her EP, Imposter.

This American Life (Series)

Produced by This American Life

Most recent piece in this series:

752: An Invitation to Tea, 10/29/2021

From This American Life | Part of the This American Life series | :00

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Climate Connections (Series)

Produced by ChavoBart Digital Media

Most recent piece in this series:

Climate Connections October 4 - October 29, 2021

From ChavoBart Digital Media | Part of the Climate Connections series | 30:00

Podcast_thumbnail_black_2020_300x300_small This month on Climate Connections: 

Air Date        Title 

Mon., 10/4 - Global warming is making ragweed pollen season worse: Ragweed is a common culprit in late summer and fall allergies.

Tue., 10/5 - How ‘nuisance’ flooding is hurting coastal economies: In many communities, water spills onto streets at high tide. The problem is getting more common as sea levels rise.

Wed., 10/6 - Mennonite leader helps other pastors speak up on climate change: Doug Kaufman’s pastoral retreats help empower Mennonite pastors and leaders to talk with their congregations about the problem.

Thu., 10/7 - Young poet calls on people to apply their talents to fighting climate change: Aniya Butler uses her skill at poetry to bring attention to racism, police brutality, and global warming.

10/8 - The Great Salt Lake is shrinking, worsening risk of dust storms: Wind kicks up dirt from the exposed lake bed, degrading local air quality.

Mon., 10/11 - More ships are crossing the Arctic, worrying local Indigenous people: Sea ice melt in the region is making the ocean more accessible to ship traffic.

Tue., 10/12 - How Georgia farmers are protecting their cattle from extreme heat: When dairy cows get too hot, they eat less and milk production drops.

Wed., 10/13 - Bed-Stuy organization works to get more people of color on bikes: The Bedford–Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation has held block parties and community bike rides.

Thu., 10/14 - Boulder students win national competition with a hyper-efficient home: The Solar Decathlon Build Challenge is organized by the U.S. Department of Energy.

Fri., 10/15 - Ghost forests are an eerie sign of rising seas: Look for these weird stands of dead or dying trees the next time you’re driving along the Atlantic coast.

Mon., 10/18 - Project helps disadvantaged organizations access federal climate funds: The Justice40 Accelerator will provide fundraising support and training to grassroots groups.

Tue., 10/19 - Scouts can earn patches for learning about solar energy: They complete activities such as building solar ovens out of pizza boxes.

Wed., 10/20 - Nonprofit works to expand solar energy in Puerto Rico: It’s starting with a 10-home pilot project in Caguas.

Thu., 10/21 - Colorado organization helps communities plan for a future without coal: The state expects all but one of its coal plants to close within the decade.

Fri., 10/22 - Some climate advocates are also working to address systemic racism: People in low-income, minority communities face disproportionate risks from pollution and weather disasters.

Mon., 10/25 - Research farm studies benefits of pairing farming with solar panels: The farm encourages community leaders, students and elected officials to visit and learn.

Tue., 10/26 - New bank specializes in climate-friendly financing: Climate First Bank in St. Petersburg, Florida, offers loans for solar installations, energy-efficient retrofits, green building projects, and the like.

Wed., 10/27 - Colorado home relies on sun to stay warm through cold winters: Tight insulation, active and passive solar systems, and a wood stove help keep the home in Bear Creek Valley fossil-fuel free.

Thu., 10/28 - Feral hogs are a problem for the climate, researcher says: They churn up soil with their snouts, releasing stored carbon to the atmosphere.

Fri., 10/29 - Composting can be as fun as smashing pumpkins: In 2020, ‘pumpkin smash’ events across Illinois and beyond kept more than 150 tons of pumpkins out of landfills.


Hearts of Space (Series)

Produced by Hearts of Space

Most recent piece in this series:

HeartsSp 211029: "THE DARK SIDE", 10/29/2021

From Hearts of Space | Part of the Hearts of Space series | :00

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Latino USA (Series)

Produced by Latino USA

Most recent piece in this series:

2143: Cost of Care, 10/29/2021

From Latino USA | Part of the Latino USA series | :00

no audio file