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Playlist: Coronavirus

Compiled By: PRX Editors

 Credit: <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/Engin_Akyurt-3656355/">Pixabay</a>
Image by: Pixabay 
Curated Playlist

Specials for this time.

Pandemic ER: Notes from a Nurse in Queens

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 59:00

War correspondents are charged with reporting from the frontlines. Putting themselves in risky situations, documenting, and sharing what they see for those of us who are not there to see it for ourselves.

Kate O'Connell is a radio producer and a registered nurse who lives and works in New York City, where the coronavirus hit with force. In addition to working in an ER in Queens, Kate has also been chronicling her experiences with the overwhelming reality of this pandemic.

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War correspondents are charged with reporting from the frontlines. Putting themselves in risky situations, documenting, and sharing what they see for those of us who are not there to see it for ourselves.

Kate O'Connell is a radio producer and a registered nurse who lives and works in New York City, where the coronavirus hit with force. In addition to working in an ER in Queens, Kate has also been chronicling her experiences with the overwhelming reality of this pandemic. About the experience, Kate says, "Honestly, coming home and writing about what I was seeing was torture. Re-living the scenes I had just left, each story reminded me of a real person, often a person who had just spent their last minutes of life with me and a small band of dedicated strangers, who for all our training could not SAVE THEIR LIFE. That is a shitty, shitty, low feeling, a heavy feeling, a decimated landscape to paint." Despite the difficulties, Kate stuck with it and steadily sent dispatches over six weeks.

We've been featuring Kate’s audio letters on Transom and in our podcast all along, and have just compiled them into an hour for public radio stations via PRX, produced with Samantha Broun. We can't say this is an easy listen, but it's an important one. We're grateful to Kate for doing this so that the rest of us might hear and know what we otherwise wouldn't be able to.





Produced for Transom.org  

 


Transom.org  channels new work and voices to public radio, with a focus on the power of story, and on the mission of public media in a changing media environment. Transom won the first Peabody Award ever granted exclusively to a website. Transom.org is a project of Atlantic Public Media which runs the Transom Story Workshops and founded WCAI, the public radio station in Woods Hole, Mass.

Support for this work comes from National Endowment for the Arts 
 

 

National Endowment for the Arts

140: What does COVID-19 Mean For Feminism? - Eve Rodsky, author of "Fair Play"

From KALW | Part of the Inflection Point with Lauren Schiller series | 54:00

Eve Rodsky has spent almost a decade surveying women and men about who does what at home to understand how and why we divide up labor along gender lines--and how to shift it--she’s talked with Economists, Psychologists, Historians, Neurologists and more. And she wrote a book called "Fair Play" that details exactly how to divide and conquer with your partner, the unending duties at home. I wanted to know if COVID-19 could be the inflection point that changes how partners divvy up the housework and childcare. We spoke for a second time in May, 2020.

Everodsky2_small Now that we are all tethered to our homes, you may be doing more laundry, dishes, cooking, cleaning (did I say dishes?), nose wiping, bottom wiping and emotionally tending to your kids and teens. So it seems super timely for us to talk to the woman who has emerged as a leader in the movement to end the gendered division of labor at home and how to divvy up that labor as equitably as possible. Eve Rodsky has spent almost a decade surveying women and men about who does what at home to understand how and why we divide up labor along gender lines--and how to shift it--she’s talked with Economists, Psychologists, Historians, Neurologists and more. And she wrote a book that details exactly how to divide and conquer with your partner, the unending duties at home. It’s called "Fair Play: A Game-Changing Solution For When You Have Too Much to Do (and More Life to Live)". If you’ve been listening to Inflection Point, you may have also caught my conversation with Eve at INFORUM last year. I wanted to hear how her system is working in the Covid-19 world. We spoke live (on Zoom, of course) for The Battery in San Francisco about how to make changes that are a win for everyone in your home and in society.

Our Show

From Atlantic Public Media | Part of the The Transom Radio Specials series | 58:59

When COVID-19 struck, Producer Erica Heilman was looking for a way to be useful. She wasn't needed to make school lunches or volunteer at the hospital, so she asked her podcast listeners if they wanted to make something together. Word spread. Around the world. "Our Show" is a gathering of voices, a voluntary oral history of this moment on the planet, a global vox pop.

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Erica Heilman's "Our Show" is like a flower arrangement, so many elements, put together just so.

Erica is the producer of the neighborly podcast, Rumble Strip, and when COVID-19 struck, she looked for a way to be useful. She wasn't needed to make school lunches or volunteer at the hospital, so she asked her podcast listeners if they wanted to make something together. Word spread. Around the world. "Our Show" is a gathering of voices, a voluntary oral history of this moment on the planet, a global vox pop.

We've been featuring "Our Show" episodes all along on Transom, and have just compiled them into a lovely poetic hour, quite unlike the daily fare. We highly recommend this for the fellowship and the surprise. We may be in it together, but it's not all the same.


      

Produced for Transom.org  

 


Transom.org  channels new work and voices to public radio, with a focus on the power of story, and on the mission of public media in a changing media environment. Transom won the first Peabody Award ever granted exclusively to a website. Transom.org is a project of Atlantic Public Media which runs the Transom Story Workshops and founded WCAI, the public radio station in Woods Hole, Mass.

Support for this work comes from National Endowment for the Arts 
 

 

National Endowment for the Arts
       

The Nocturnists: Stories from a Pandemic (Series)

Produced by The Nocturnists

The Nocturnists: Stories from a Pandemic is an audio miniseries that follows healthcare workers' daily lives as they navigate the coronavirus pandemic.

Most recent piece in this series:

Episode 10: Mourning

From The Nocturnists | Part of the The Nocturnists: Stories from a Pandemic series | 30:01

Nocturnists_libsyntilepandemicnew_small How does the COVID-19 pandemic end? Does it end in a bang, or just fizzle out? What we know for sure is that this story is far from over. In today’s episode you will hear from a pediatric hospitalist, a laboratory scientist, a pulmonologist, a hospitalist, a trauma nurse, an ob/gyn, and an internal medicine resident, from across California and the Midwest, Michigan, New Jersey, and New York. Featuring Leonard Cohen's Hallelujah.

A SUDDEN LOSS - A Memorial To Lives Lost To COVID-19 (59:00 / 54:00 / 29:00/ plus optional 2nd hour)

From Paul Ingles | 01:57:59

Popular public radio hosts, past and present, read short eulogies to just some of the tens of thousands lost to the coronavirus pandemic in the last several months.

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Popular public radio hosts, past and present, read short eulogies to just some of the tens of thousands lost to the coronavirus pandemic in the United States in the months of March, April and May, 2020.
Produced by public radio veteran producer Paul Ingles and featuring the voices of Susan Stamberg, Noah Adams, Liane Hansen,
Maria Martin, Al Letson, Neal Conan, Glynn Washington and others.

Music accents include songs by Eddie Vedder (The Long Road), Robbie Robertson (Fallen Angel), Joni Mitchell (Both Sides Now), Bruce Springsteen (Missing), Aretha Franklin (Amazing Grace), John Prine (Summer's End / Boundless Love), U2 (Peace on Earth).

NOTE: Some songs are not in the 29:00 version.

Outbreaks and Epidemics: The Role of Public Health

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse Specials series | 58:59

You know you've made it when you get parodied on Saturday Night Live … by none other than Brad Pitt. And you really know you’ve made it when Pitt breaks character to thank you for your service. That was an honor recently bestowed upon Anthony Fauci, America's bespectacled top infectious disease physician, who’s achieved rock star levels of fame in recent weeks. Usually, though, public health officials have much lower profiles. They’re behind-the-scenes thinkers and doers, who help keep their communities healthy with initiatives like traffic safety, vaccinations, and fluoridated water. In the best of times, we don’t even know they’re there — but during disease outbreaks, their work kicks into high gear. So how did this field get its start? And what can we learn from past crises, starting with the yellow fever outbreak of 1793, through the AIDS epidemic, into the present? In this episode, we hear stories about the origins of public health; how the 1918 flu pandemic shaped the modern bathroom; and how schools and public health became a power couple

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

Yellow Fever Outbreak 

We explore the very beginnings of public health in America by telling the story of the yellow fever epidemic of 1793, which ravaged the young nation’s capital.

Vaccines and schools — a public health power couple

Every school year, in all 50 states, parents have to prove their kids have received certain vaccines before enrolling them in school. Specific requirements differ from state to state, but the general rules is the same: no vaccines, no school. Reporter Avi Wolfman-Arent explores how this relationship between schools and public health took root.

What is public health?

Alison Buttenheim, an associate professor of nursing and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania, joins us to talk about the role of public health during the coronavirus outbreak and explains why the core of her job is to make it seem like nothing’s happened.

Lessons from HIV/AIDS pandemic

What lessons can we learn from America’s last major epidemic — HIV/AIDS? We ask Carlos Del Rio, a professor of medicine and global health at Emory University, about how public health approaches shaped the HIV epidemic, and vice versa.

How a pandemic inspired your bathroom

During the coronavirus outbreak, we’re constantly hearing about the importance of washing our hands and keeping surfaces clean. A little more than 100 years ago, this same concern over cleanliness emerged during the 1918 flu pandemic. Architect David Feldman joins us to discuss how this past pandemic helped to shape our homes — especially the bathroom.

Coronavirus Conspiracism

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 59:00

Conversations with Errol Morris, Anna Merlan, and Jay Rosen about conspiracy theories of the pandemic.

Screen_shot_2020-05-14_at_8 What we’re learning again in coronavirus time is that when the medical system stumbles in a pandemic – and when the media machinery, the chattering class stumbles on top it – watch out! Something like it happened two centuries ago when Yellow Fever struck New York and Philadelphia. Nobody knew then to blame the mosquitos that carried the bug, so a society of feckless thinkers – the Illuminati, so called — took the heat. We are in a boom time again for blaming all sorts of people for COVID-19: Bill Gates, Globalism, Dr. Fauci, China. It is high season for conspiracism, and YouTube videos have become the place to tune in.

There’s a boisterous new kid on the media block, at an active corner in the coronavirus conversation. People get there on Google’s YouTube channel on the Internet. The stream of videos can have a compelling voice, a documentary look, lots of added effects and typically the feel of a hard sell. Lots of people hear it as propaganda. Lots of others hear a galvanizing truth. 

Mental Health in Times of Crisis

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse Specials series | 58:59

The COVID-19 outbreak is creating increased demand for mental health services — lots of people are feeling anxious, or are getting depressed. At the same time, traditional mental health services have been disrupted. In-person sessions are not possible at the moment, nor are group sessions. How are providers and their clients adjusting? We take a look at mental health services and what people are doing to stay well during these difficult times. We also hear stories of families affected by serious mental health issues, and why they say the system fails too many people

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS:

Shot and surviving
A lot of people come into this crisis with pre-existing mental health issues — for example traumatic experiences that have shaped and changed their lives.  Reporter Nina Feldman tells the story of a young woman whose anxiety stems from one moment when she was just 11 years old. 

Finding help for schizophrenia in a ‘broken’ system
Writer Marin Sardy tells the story of her brother, Tom, and his battle with schizophrenia. When Tom was first diagnosed, Marin and her family did everything they could to get him help. There was just one problem: Tom refused to accept it. Reporter Liz Tung looks into what resources are available to families with loved ones experiencing a mental health crisis, and how do you force someone to get help.

Conversations with host Maiken Scott
 
Tips for keeping it together during coronavirus
The coronavirus virus outbreak has increased the need for mental health treatments and it’s also putting a spotlight on the fact that our existing mental health system has not always been accessible or helpful.  We check in with several mental health providers to see how the field is responding to the crisis. We also hear what people are doing to stay well.

Primary care and mental health
When you’re faced with a mental health crisis, who do you call? Internist and regular Pulse contributor, Neda Freyha talks to us about how primary care physicians might be the first and only access point for some people with mental health issues. She discusses how challenging it is to speak to someone facing a mental health crisis, because there is no prescribed plan of action or standardized treatment for it. 

Bedlam
Psychiatrist and documentarian Kenneth Paul Rosenberg talks about possible strategies for families facing a mental health crisis. His book, “Bedlam: An Intimate Journey into America’s Mental Health Crisis,” traces the failure of the U.S. mental health system. His film, with the same title, premieres on "Independent Lens" this month. 

Finding Resilience During a Pandemic

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse Specials series | 58:59

What does it take to get through a global pandemic? How do you keep going, keep working, get up every day and hope for the best? Around the world, people are discovering the answer through their own sense of resilience — the resources within ourselves and our communities that brace us against outside pressures, allowing us to bend, and not break. On this episode, we explore what resilience means, with stories about people facing down sometimes impossible situations, and finding a way to adapt, recover, and eventually bounce back. We hear about an Olympic athlete who is dealing with the historic postponement of Tokyo 2020, an ER nurse in New York City treating patients with COVID-19, and we’ll find out why kids may emerge stronger on the other side of this pandemic.

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PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS


How do elite athletes deal with a delayed Olympics?
Nia Akins ran the second fastest 800 meters in NCAA history in Feb., making her Olympic ‘pipe dream’ seem real. A month later the world shut down facing a deadly pandemic. When training for the biggest events takes months or years, how do you deal with Tokyo 2021? On top of her training, Nia is also preparing to join the medical front lines — she’s a nursing senior. 

Fighting the odds to find a cure
David Fajgenbaum was in medical school when he was diagnosed with Castleman disease - a rare and deadly illness with no known cure. We hear about Fajgenbaum’s extraordinary fight to not only survive, but also find a possible cure. Since we reported that story, Fajgenbaum has begun to work on finding a possible treatment for the cytokine storms that occur with both Castleman and COVID-19. 

Pandemic ER: Notes from a nurse in Queens
An average day in the emergency room is never easy, and during a pandemic, the stakes are even higher — with more patients needing critical care. ER nurse and audio producer Kate O’Connell shares what it’s like working on the front lines of the coronavirus outbreak in the Transom series “Pandemic ER: Notes From A Nurse In Queens.” We also hear from Donna Nickitas, dean and professor of nursing at Rutgers University-Camden, on what nurses can do to get through this tough time.

Tradeoffs 
Primary care practices play a vital role as a first line of defense with our health in general, but the pandemic could threaten their survival. Dan Gorenstein, host of the podcast Tradeoffs, explains why these providers are facing tough choices to keep their doors open.

When will this be over?
Everyone wants to know: When will things go back to normal? A lot of us are turning to routines to get us through - getting up early, working hard, it helps a lot of us feel a sense of normalcy. But Aisha Ahmad, assistant professor of political science at the University of Toronto, says don’t use frantic productivity as a way to ignore the vast shift that is happening right now. She shares her advice from living through war zones in an essay she recorded her us.

Conversations with host Maiken Scott

What it means to be resilient?
What does it take to get through a crisis? You need to be resilient, but what does that mean? Psychologist Dan Gottlieb, draws on his personal experience as a quadriplegic, and says humans are far more resilient than we think we are.

Shared resilience 
Sometimes it can feel like resilience is an individual trait — something that you either have, or you don’t. But Michael Ungar, therapist, social work professor, and director of the Resilience Research Centre at Dalhousie University — explains how community and social structure play into our shared resilience.

Transmission Times: Radio Diaries During COVID-19 (Series)

Produced by Katie Semro

Audio diaries from around the world giving us a glimpse of daily life during the pandemic.

Most recent piece in this series:

"Come on 2020, just stop it."

From Katie Semro | Part of the Transmission Times: Radio Diaries During COVID-19 series | 15:17

Tt_thumbnail__small The Transmission Times provides a weekly snapshot of what life is like all over the USA and the world during this pandemic, through the voices of the people themselves.

Listeners will recognize aspects of their own pandemic experience as well as hear sides of this moment they might not know about.