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Playlist: Happy New Year & Year in Review

Compiled By: PRX Editors

Curated Playlist

Resolutions, reflections, and more.

Below are picks chosen by PRX editorial staff. You can find other options for the New Year by using our search.

New in 2019

Best Albums of 2019

From Sound Opinions | Part of the Sound Opinions Specials series | 54:00

As 2019 comes to a close, hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot reflect on the best albums of the year. They also hear from Sound Opinions producers and listeners about their favorites.

Bestalbums2019_small As 2019 comes to a close, hosts Jim DeRogatis and Greg Kot reflect on the best albums of the year. They also hear from Sound Opinions producers and listeners about their favorites.

A Shortcut Through 2019

From Peter Bochan | Part of the Shortcuts series | 59:59

An emotional retrospective of the past twelve months, featuring the major events, the culture, the climate, and the politics, dramatically mixed with the music and sounds of the past year-including tributes to those who left us in 2019

Greta_small

A final look at the past year with Greta Thunberg, Alex Trebek, Toni Morrison, Elijah Cummings, Allison Tolman. Brad Pitt, Nancy Pelosi, Adam Schiff, Donald Trump, Lizzo, Alan Arkin & Michael Douglas, Alison Brie, Bernie Sanders, Lil Naz X feat. Billy Ray Cyrus, Bill Callahan, Stacey Abrams, John Singleton, Russell Baker, Elizabeth Warren, Peter Dinklage, Michael Cohen, Carol Channing, Negativeland, Deena, Robert Mueller, Alexandria Ocasio Cortez, Leon Redbone, Ginger Baker, Hal Prince, Hal Blaine, Peter Fonda, Dick Dale, Stanley Clarke, Don Shirley, Mark Hamill, Oscar Isaac, Jerrold Nadler, Devin Nunes, Rik Ocasek, Stephen Colbert, Kaye Ballard, Rudy Giuliani, Joe Biden, Scott Walker, Paula Cole, Doris Day, Diahann Carroll, Clancy Brown, Jim Jordan, Chris Cuomo, Miles Davis feat. Ledisi, Mick Mulvaney, Peter Welch, Trevor Noah, William Taylor, George P. Kent, Kamala Harris, Marie Yovanovitch, Jake Black (A3), Anthony Daniels (C3PO), M. Ward, Florence & The Machine, Haelos, Barack Obama, Eddie Money, Paul Krassner & Steve Post, Marshall Efron, Dred Scott Keyes, Danny Elfman, Gary Duncan (Quick Silver Messenger Service), John Witherspoon, Adam Driver, Harold Mabern, Radiohead, Caroll Spinney (as Big Bird), Lawrence O'Donnell, Rip Torn, Mary Oliver, Craig Armstrong, Bill St. James, Dr. John, Daniel Johnston and Ken Nordine.

Dedicated to Neil Peter Jampolis, Nancy Lewis, and Dred Scott Keyes

The Keepers (Series)

Produced by The Kitchen Sisters

The Keepers, two new hour-long Specials from The Kitchen Sisters and PRX with host, Academy Award-winning actress, Frances McDormand. Stories of activist archivists, rogue librarians, curators, collectors and historians. Keepers of the culture and the culture and collections they keep. Striking and surprising stories of preservation and civic life. Available soon from PRX. Sound-rich, highly produced, hope-filled — perfect for the holiday season and turn of the year.

Most recent piece in this series:

95,000 Names: Gert McMullin, Sewing the Frontline

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the The Keepers series | 30:01

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In 1985, Gert McMullin was one of the first San Franciscans to put a stitch on the AIDS Quilt, the quilt that began with one memorial square in honor of a man who had died of AIDS, and that now holds some 95,000 names. Gert never planned it this way, but over the decades she has become the Keeper of the Quilt and has stewarded it, repaired it, tended it, traveled with it and conserved it for some 33 years now. Gert knows the power of sewing.

In 2020, when COVID-19 hit, Gert was one of the first Bay Area citizens to begin sewing masks—PPE for nurses and health care workers who were lacking proper protection—masks she makes from fabric left over from the making of the AIDS Quilt. The comfort, outrage and honoring of an earlier pandemic being used to protect people from a new one.

In January of 2020 The AIDS Memorial Quilt, now part of The National AIDS Memorial, returned home to the Bay Area after 16 years in Atlanta. It took six 52-foot semis to get it there. The over sixty tons of quilt, is made up of about 48,000 panels, each 3 x 6 feet, the size of a grave. The extensive AIDS Archive, which Gert gathered, collected and protected since its earliest days, is now part of The American Folklife Center at The Library of Congress in Washington, DC.

The story of Gert McMullin and the AIDS Memorial Quilt, the Gay Rights Movement in San Francisco, Harvey Milk, The White Night Riots. With interviews with LGBT Rights activist Cleve Jones who worked with Harvey Milk and conceived of the AIDS Memorial Quilt, and John Cunningham, Executive Director of the National AIDS Memorial.

Political Junkie 2019 Remembrances Special

From Ken Rudin's Political Junkie | Part of the Political Junkie (Specials) series | 53:58

As 2018 draws to a close, Political Junkie Ken Rudin remembers the lawmakers and newsmakers from the world of politics who passed away this year. Ken interviews their colleagues, friends and the journalists who covered them, to reflect on their passions and chronicle their accomplishments. Join us for the Political Junkie 2019 Remembrances Special, as we recount these individuals’ contributions to political history, and honor their commitments to public service.

Remembrances_special_logo_small

As 2019 draws to a close, Political Junkie Ken Rudin remembers the lawmakers and newsmakers from the world of politics who passed away this year. Ken interviews their colleagues, friends and the journalists who covered them, to reflect on their passions and chronicle their accomplishments. Join us for the Political Junkie 2019 Remembrances Special, as we recount these individuals’ contributions to political history, and honor their commitments to public service.
 
Among the many whose careers were discussed include:

-- Ross Perot, billionaire independent presidential candidate
-- Lyndon LaRouche, eccentric presidential also-ran and cult figure
-- Elijah Cummings, 23-year Democratic member of the House from Baltimore;
-- Birch Bayh, former Indiana senator (D) who led the fight for 2 constitutional amendments
-- Dick Lugar, former Indiana senator (R) and a leader in the battle to curtail nuclear weapons
-- Fritz Hollings, tart-tongued South Carolinian senator who sought the presidency
-- John Dingell, the longest serving member of the House
-- John Conyers, the longest serving African American in congressional history
-- John Paul Stevens, a liberal Supreme Court justice appointed by a Republican president
-- William Ruckelshaus, whose career came to an end when he refused a Nixon order
-- Cokie Roberts, who broke glass ceilings in a long career as a congressional reporter

Additional information about this special is available on our website. 

The 2019 Musicians Memorial Special (One-Hour Version)

From Paul Ingles | 59:00

Each year we lose more greats from the music world. Music historian Paul Ingles presents 2019's edition of the Musician's Memorial Special featuring music and tributes to Dr. John, Art Neville, Ric Ocasek, Little Feat's Paul Barrere, Ginger Baker, Leon Redbone, Dave Bartholomew, Nibsey Hussle, Eddie Money, Roky Erickson, Clydie King and many more. This is the one hour version.

2019special_small Each year we lose more greats from the music world.  Year's end seems the perfect time to show our gratitude, love and thanks to them.  In recent years, music documentarian Paul Ingles has produced the year-end compilation that bids a proper and fond farewell to some of the best-loved artists.  2019's edition features music and tributes to Dr. John, Art Neville, Ric Ocasek, Little Feat's Paul Barrere, Ginger Baker, Leon Redbone, Dave Bartholomew, Nibsey Hussle, Eddie Money, Roky Erickson, Clydie King and many more.

PLAYLIST:

One of Those Good For Crying Over You Days - Clydie King  2:05
I Ain't Blue - Willie Murphy  2:44
Miserlou - Dick Dale  1:24
30 Century Man - Scott Walker  1:08
Who's Dat Looking - The English Beat (Ranking Roger) 1:06
Grinding All My Life - Nibsey Hussle  1:38
I Want to Be Seduced - Leon Redbone   2:40
Starry Eyes - Roky Erickson  2:10
Such A Night - The Band with Dr. John  3:21
Dela - Johnny Clegg  2:25
Fire on the Bayou - The Funky Meters with Art Neville  1:16
Country Boy - Dave  Bartholomew   1:57
Maybe I'm The Only One For Me - Daniel Berman / Purple Mountains  2:00
Skin It Back - Little Feat (Paul Barerre)  2:02
For Pete's Sake - The Monkees (Peter Tork)  1:39
Time Has Come Today - Chambers Brothers  :58
Heaven - Chambers Brothers  2:10
Rock 'n' Roll Is Here To Stay -   Danny & The Juniors  1:25
Really, Really Happy - The Muffs   1:52
The Look - Roxette   1:00
Sleeping In My Car - Roxette  1:18
I Don't Have The Heart - James Ingram  1:11
Hungry - Paul Revere & The Raiders (Hal Blaine)  1:47
Funky Broadway - Wilson Pickett (Jimmy Johnson)  1:12
Sunshine of Your Love - Cream (Ginger Baker)  2:30
Everybody Rock 'n' Roll The Place - Eddie Money  1:16
Just What I Needed - Cars (Ric Ocasek)  2:08
Saddle Up The Grey - New Lost City Ramblers (John Cohen)  1:26
Uncle John's Band - Grateful Dead (Robert Hunter)  2:27
Ripple - The Persuasions (Jerry Lawson)  1:46

2019-12-06 High Risks, High Hopes: A Year of Climate Conversations

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:58

2019 has been a year of climate rising. Youth activists skipped school and took to the streets, the Green New Deal thrust climate equity into the spotlight, and presidential candidates were forced to respond. Democrats are competing on climate policies more than ever before. Even a few Republicans dared to suggest climate is a concern that needs to be addressed. Join us for a look back on the big ideas that shaped some of our favorite episodes from 2019.

Prx_high_risk_high_hopes_small

In this special episode we look back at the climate stories of 2019 by listening to excerpts from a year of climate conversations.

Although many climate conversations talk about impacts on future generations, all too often those younger generations are not at the table or in the room. So how are young people taking charge of their climate future? For Isha Clarke, a high school student and activist from Oakland, California, by speaking truth to the senior U.S. Senator from her state.

The climate conversation in Washington has changed enough that Democrats and Republicans are talking climate deals. A lot of that change can be attributed to the Green New Deal, a Democratic resolution co-sponsored Sen. Ed Markey, who has served over 40 years in Congress and co-authored the last big legislative push for national climate policy a decade ago.

What does a former advisor to Richard Nixon think about the climate crisis? Political analyst David Gergen, who served in four presidential administrations, favors urgent action on climate but is skeptical of the all-encompassing vision of the Green New Deal.

Shortly after the U.S. Senate confirmed Andrew Wheeler as Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Greg Dalton sat down for a rare interview with the new EPA chief at a conference on the future of personal mobility.

In 2018, Carlos Curbelo, Republican of Florida, proposed legislation that would impose a carbon tax, which garnered the support of many of his GOP colleagues. What inspired him to act on an unpopular cause? 

Would you vote for the candidate who says he’ll declare climate change a national emergency on Day One of his presidency? Businessman and activist Tom Steyer says his willingness to use emergency powers to deal with the climate crisis sets him apart from the crowded field of Democratic candidates.

As people are attracted to areas of lower vulnerability, developers see an opportunity to make a killing. Valencia Gunder, a community organizer and climate educator in Miami, recognizes the irony. As longtime residents are being priced out of their community, climate change isn’t helping matters.

In his new book The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming, David Wallace-Wells explores how climate change will impact not just the planet, but human lives – including how a five degree increase in temperatures would make parts of the planet unsurvivable.

Many of us find it daunting to talk with our neighbors, colleagues and family members about climate change. But climate scientist Katharine Hayhoe says that having those difficult conversations is the first step towards solving the problem.


Classic Hours (49:00-1:00:00)

The New Year’s Eve Jam

From WFIU | Part of the Night Lights Classic Jazz: Specials series | 59:01

An hour-long special featuring jazz music and spoken-word performances for the coming New Year from Charlie Parker, Lenny Bruce, Slim Gaillard, Ken Nordine, and more.

New_year_s_eve_show_small "The New Year's Eve Jam" ushers in the coming year in radio nightclub style, with music from Slim Gaillard, Harry the Hipster Gibson, Charlie Parker, Big John Patton, and more, as well as spoken-word pieces from Ken Nordine, Lenny Bruce, and Gregory Corso... an evening for hipsters, flipsters, and time-trippin' daddies.

New Years: A Reflection

From Western Folklife Center Media | 57:03

A meditation on New Year's as a time of reflection and healing.

Default-piece-image-0 Join in a New Year journey with host Hal Cannon to an ancient Gaelic ritual of bringing in the year with fiddler Alasdair Frazier. Then join Jean Redpath for the original ?Auld Lang Syne.? From the Isles back to the States we travel to delve into the Native American way of marking time with a heartfelt story from Lakota elder, Leonard Littlefinger telling how ritual can help us transform a brutal history into a new story of hope. We end with the hope of a healthy land from the Grand Canyon. Join us

Notes On Winter - A Seasonal Music Special

From Charlie Warren | Part of the "Notes On" - Seasonal Specials series | 58:58

A warm smooth-flowing mix of intriguing facts, gentle humor, and a variety of pop, soft-rock, classical, alternative, film, and show tunes, current and classic. For airing December through February.

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Mostly warm winter songs from Sara Bareilles, Antonio Vivaldi, Enya, Gordon Lightfoot, Sarah McLaughlin, Simon & Garfunkel, John Barry film score (not-so-warm), John Denver (cold), Frank Loesser show tunes, and many more.



Half-Hour (24:00-30:00)

All In Time

From Sarah Boothroyd | 25:01

Guided by science and science fiction, All In Time traverses the timeless mystery of time itself. This work won a Gold World Medal for Best Sound at the New York Festivals Radio Programming Awards.

All_in_time_-_credit_paulo_martel_small NOTE: you can listen to the stereo .wav version of this piece at: http://sarahboothroyd.com/artwork/2053112_ALL_IN_TIME.html

 

The clock ticks; the moon waxes; the autumn leaves turn crimson. Time is as ubiquitous as it is elusive. Guided by science and science fiction, All In Time traverses the timeless mystery of time itself.

This 25-minute work won the 2011 Luc Ferrari International Broadcast Arts Competition, won a 2011 Gold World Medal for Best Sound at the New York Festivals Radio Programming Awards, and was shortlisted for the 2011 Phonurgia Nova Prize.

All In Time was commissioned by La Muse En Circuit in Paris (Centre National de Création Musicale), with the support of Radio Suisse Romande, Deutschlandradio Kultur, RTBF Musiq 3, Groupe de Recherches Musicales, and Radio-France.

In 2011 All In Time was broadcast on Radio Suisse Romande in Switzerland; on Deutschlandradio Kultur in Germany; on Swedish Radio Channel 2; on TIK ArtRadio Days in Slovakia; on The Radius (New York), WKXR (New York), WMUA (Massachusetts), KUT (Texas), and KFAI (Minnesota) in the U.S.A.; and on over 40 radio stations around the world, thanks to the Radiophonic Creation Day Festival and the Future Places Festival.

This independent production was also published on two CDs – Deep Wireless VIII and Concours d'art radiophonique Luc Ferrari: Composer Le Réel – and was featured in several online publications; including Transom.org, Public Radio Remix Blog, Third Coast International Audio Festival, Syntone, InStereoPress, Girrlsound, and Infinity's Kitchen.

In 2011, All In Time was also presented in spatialized, octophonic format at the Archipel Contemporary Music Festival in Switzerland; at Festival Extension XI and the Prix Phonurgia Nova Concert in France; at Netaudio London in the U.K.; at the Ohrenhoch Sound Art Gallery in Germany; at the Deep Wireless Festival (Toronto) and Canadian Electroacoustic Community Anniversary Concert (Vancouver) in Canada; and at the PNEM Festival in The Netherlands.

Written, recorded, edited and mixed by Sarah Boothroyd, special thanks are extended to physics maven Peter Watson; to antique clock collector Georges Royer; to Travis Morgan and Dokashiteru for providing Creative Commons samples; and to Himan and Melina Brown for permitting the use of CBS Radio Mystery Theatre clips.



To read more about this production please visit
http://transom.org/?p=16802,
http://thirdcoastfestival.org/library/1009-all-in-time?closed=true, and
http://publicradioremix.org/2011/09/pressing-play-may-stop-time

Copyright: All Rights Reserved

Fast Food: What and Why

From Barry Vogel | 29:00

Fast food: What it is, how it is sold, and what it does to us.

Default-piece-image-0 Fast food is what many people eat in America, and increasingly so in other countries. It is advertised to be fun, tasty and easily available. We Americans spend more money on fast food annually than on higher education. Eric Schlosser, the author of ?Fast Food Nation, the Dark Side of the All-American Meal? writes that it is not only what is served for human consumption that is the problem, but the art of mass marketing to children, through organized promotions and ads for it products in school buses, hallways and even bathroom stalls, have serious side effects in society. Further, the working conditions for employees of meat packing plants, and the resulting contamination of their products, resulting as of July 2002 in the recall of 19 million pounds of beef. In addition to the acute health hazard of contamination, a fast food meal often contains more fat in one meal that the average person needs in a day. This conversation with Eric Schlosser begins with his description of the problem of an excess of fat in fast food.

Toxic Living

From Voices of Our World | 28:00

Deirdre Imus explains the connection between household chemical cleaning agents and pediatric cancers.

Toxic_small Part One: TOXIC LIVING: They say ?what you don?t know can?t hurt you?. While there is some truth to that, being informed allows us to make better choices. From formaldehyde to methyl-mercury to dioxins, there are a wide variety of hazardous chemicals in our furnishings, clothing, cleaning and grooming products, our food, water and air. Kathy Golden speaks with Deirdre Imus, founder of the Deirdre Imus Environmental Center for Pediatric Oncology, a foundation committed to promoting non-toxic alternatives to the more harmful products we may be using everyday. OPTIONAL CUTAWAY CUE: ?That?s 1-8-7-7 M-A-R-Y-K-N-O-L-L" at 14:00. Part Two: MERCURY RISING: Most of us have been exposed to mercury, a poisonous metallic element and neuro-toxin, in several of its various forms, either in the fish we eat or even as an ingredient in a vaccine we received. The mercury preservative in inoculations is thimerosal, and Deirdre Imus advises that parents simply request thimerosal-free vaccines. Then we talk with Nat Mund, Senior Washington Representative for the Sierra Club about the latest relaxations in emission standards for coal burning power plants and the resulting rise in environmental mercury contamination. End Cue: ?And please be sure to join us next time for more Voices of Our World.? At 28:00. Can be broadcast at 14:00 or 28:00 minutes. Format fits well into either time slot.


Segments (9:00-23:59)

Happy New Year

From The Truth | 12:18

Walt Avery is throwing a New Year's Eve party. He's invited all his friends, and expects a big crowd. Who will show up? And who won't? In this short story, we spend an evening with a man coming to terms with the death of his wife, and the choices he has made to preserve her memory.

Playing
Happy New Year
From
The Truth

Newyear_icon_2_small Walt Avery is throwing a New Year's Eve party. He's invited all his friends, and expects a big crowd. Who will show up? And who won't? In this short story, we spend an evening with a man coming to terms with the death of his wife, and the choices he has made to preserve her memory.

Performed by Ben Jones and Tom Ligon.

Written and directed by Jonathan Mitchell. 

Finding My Place

From Judah Bruce Leblang | 22:00

A memoir piece about overcoming depression and finding hope.

Default-piece-image-0 "Finding My Place" is a 'This American Life" style piece, the story of a turning point in the author's life, the ties of family that bind and sometime unwind, and the humor and hope that come when one rises out of a period of depression and moves toward hope.

Everybody SCREAM!!!

From The Truth | 10:32

New Year's resolution to head to the gym more often? Watch out for these people! Spin class gets personal.

Disco_ball_purple_small On this episode of The Truth, we're going to spin class. Warm up that saddle and pick up the pace, as we go inside the imaginations of two very competitive women.

Chet Siegel as Sam
Emily Tarver as Lisa
Ed Herbstman as Kirk
Produced by Jonathan Mitchell
written collaboratively by The Truth, from a story by Chet Siegel

Special thanks: Peter Clowney, Kerrie Hillman, Madeline Sparer and Chris Bannon. Recorded at WNYC and on location in New York City

Clever Apes: First memories

From WBEZ | Part of the WBEZ's Clever Apes series | 08:22

Our childhood memories may not always be reliable, but they have a lot to teach us about how we think, learn, and build an identity. In this episode, Gabriel Spitzer explores what science has to say about our first memories.

Gabe_trike_for_web_small_small

I’m sitting at a picnic table in our screened-in porch. It’s my third birthday party, and I’m opening presents. I unwrap a Tonka truck, and drop to the floor to start playing with it.

That’s been my earliest memory ever since I can, well, remember. But as the years wore on, something weird started happening. I started to feel less attached to the person in that memory. Now, I feel like I’m seeing the memory through someone else’s eyes, watching myself push that truck on the green astroturf carpet. I’m not even sure it’s a real memory anymore.

This has been on my mind because my own son recently had his third birthday. It got me wondering what his first memory will be, and more broadly, what is the nature of early memories? How reliable might they be, and how important to the construction of our identities?

On the latest installment of Clever Apes, we dig into what science has to say about early memory. Young kids actually have lots of memories that don’t make it into long-term storage. The phenomenon, called “childhood amnesia,” is not very well understood. But it seems to have something to do with the lens through which we see the world, and how it changes from early childhood (say, age three) to the more verbal period starting around age five or six. It’s tough to bridge that divide, and that may explain why I’m having a hard time connecting with my three-year old self.

And there’s another reason: memories are made from networks of neurons in our brains. That wiring gets used for lots of things, and so with each new memory, the networks change a little. When we remember something, we effectively rewrite it. That means that in some sense, each time we reflect on a memory, we’re putting a little more distance between ourselves and the actual event. Recent research suggests we’re even doing this in our sleep.

It’s enough to give a fellow a dose of existential distress. But there’s an upside too: A Chicago researcher has demonstrated ways that parents can reinforce and help solidify a child’s memories.If you listen to the show, you can hear me trying this out on my son, Ezra. I bribed him with M&Ms to get him to sit still.


Cutaways (5:00-8:59)

The Kindness of Strangers

From Kirsty McQuire | 06:15

A lovely mission and an aspiration for the new year. One woman's philanthropic mission comes full circle.

Kindness_4th-sept-2011_small During the leap year of 2012, Bernadette Russell embarked on a mission to complete 366 Days of Kindness. Her efforts were prompted by the riots that spread through her adopted home town of London and across English towns and cities, between 6th and 10th August 2011.

Bernadette has left sweets in phone boxes, books on trains, £5 notes on buses. She has given away balloons, cakes, flowers and lottery tickets, written letters to a soldier returned from Afghanistan and offered her socks to the homeless. She practiced ‘targeted’ rather than ‘random’ acts of kindness but she says she ‘expected nothing in return.’

Bernadette is now turning her 366 philanthropic experiences into a stage play, in collaboration with Jacksons Lane Theatre in London and with support from Birmingham Rep and Forkbeard Fantasy.


Good Morning!

From Sara Brooke Curtis | 05:00

A collection of remixed "Good Morning" voicemail messages from friends all over the world. A nice way to start a morning -- or a year!

Img_0715_small A friend of mine gave me an assignment to answer my telephone at 7:30 am on December 7th. She gave my phone number to one of her writing mentors and told her to call me. My only guidelines were to answer the telephone and share something with her. So..I created a Google Voice account and asked my friends and family to leave Good Morning messages. I edited a handfull of my favorites together, mixed them with some music, and layered in a recording of my Grandfather singing one of his favorite songs. At 7:30 am I shared this piece with the stranger. She emailed me today and told me that she's taken to playing it every monring as part of her daily ritual.

Stress Test

From Hans Anderson | 07:20

I took a stress test that seemed to include testing my stress level on getting to the stress test.

Playing
Stress Test
From
Hans Anderson

Default-piece-image-0 I took a stress test that seemed to include testing my stress level on getting to the stress test. Experimental sound. Kind of annoying. Public radio! Ha! I laugh at you for that thought! Of course not Public Radio. Not unless I ran the show. Be glad I don't. For more information and conversation, visit this feature on Transom.org.

Time in Film

From Jonathan Mitchell | 06:45

Three film critics dissect how directors have twisted time.

Timecode_small In the movies, a single cut can jump several decades. Bullets stop and linger onscreen. In this piece, three film critics dissect how directors have twisted time in recent movies. Orginally aired on Studio 360 in May, 2002 NOTE: Because this piece was produced in 2002, the film examples are probably a bit dated. Included are examples from Memento, Run Lola Run, and Timecode. We hear from: Holly Willis, editor of Res magazine Michael Fox, film journalist for San Francisco Weekly David Laderman, professor of film at the College of San Mateo


Drop-Ins (2:00-4:59)

Program 17: A New Year's Recitation

From Vermont Folklife Center Media | Part of the Journey's End: The Memories and Traditions of Daisy Turner and her Family series | 04:56

By the turn of the century the Turner household had become a kind of community social center. This program explores the texture of these gatherings.

Daisyturner_small By the turn of the century the Turner household had become a kind of community social center. For parties they would hire a fiddler and Daisy would call the dances. The highlight of the evening would sometimes be a poetry recitation. This program features Daisy reciting one of these poems.

Praying for Peace in The New Year

From Paul McDonald | 02:27

What might really happen if every warrior on the planet beat his sword into a plowshare?

Peace_small Broadcast on WFPL, December 22, 2005.

Ask the Librarian: Will green tea treat my high blood pressure?

From Jackson Braider | Part of the Ask the Librarian series | 04:23

Does green tea help with high blood pressure?

Marthastone_small In libraries as in life, there are specialties and specialists of all stripes. Martha Stone is Coordinator for Reference Services at Treadwell Library at the celebrated Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. As you might expect, given where she works, people tend to ask Martha health-related questions. Beyond dealing with the question -- will green tea help my high blood pressure? -- Martha provides insights into the uses of the web and the power of the printed word.
Picked up in a previous version by WYSO.
Two versions offered following Dmae Roberts' comments: Segment 1 contains music; Segment 2 is music-free.

Breaking Up Christmas

From With Good Reason | Part of the Folklife FieldNotes series | 03:30

When Christmas is over, the fun is just getting started for many in Southern Appalachia.

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Folklorsit Jon Lohman shares the background of  little-known tradition of "Breaking Up Christmas," a series of gatherings the week between Christmas and New Year's, where people get together in each other's homes and jam until the wee hours of the morning. Many generations participate, and it's a really wonderful way for the community to come together and wind down the holiday season.


How do you sabrage in France?

From Rachel Louise Snyder | Part of the Global Guru Radio series | 03:00

Everyone will be drinking champagne on New Year's Eve, but will everyone be opening the champagne with a sword? Learn how the French sabrage.

Champagne-bottles-post-sabrage_small The Global Guru is a weekly public radio spot that celebrates the oddities, the curiosities, the unknowns of global culture, particularly in countries where Americans have either single narrative story lines, like Afghanistan (war), Thailand (sex tourism), Rwanda, (genocide), or perhaps no story lines at all, like East Timor, Moldova, Malta, Lesotho, etc. Engaging and rich in sound, the 3:00 interstitial helps us connect to the vastness of human experience. Presenting station is WAMU in Washington, DC and sponsored by American University in DC. Some of our favorite past shows include: How do Cambodians predict the harvest each year? What messages do cigarettes send in Chinese business dealings? How did Tanzania become the capitol of barbershops? How and why does Thailand categorize food? What is Iceland’s most feared culinary delight? How do you track a Tasmanian devil? What are the hidden messages in Zulu beadwork? 

StoryCorps: Scott Wall and Isabel Sobozinsky-Wall

From StoryCorps | 02:28

Scott Wall and his wife, Isabel Sobozinsky-Wall, talk about their long-distance courtship that began on New Year's Eve.

Sobozinsky-wall_small Scott Wall and his wife, Isabel Sobozinsky-Wall, talk about their long-distance courtship that began on New Year's Eve.

Seasonal Affective Disorder

From Paul McDonald | 02:12

What if this is as good as it gets?

Sad_small Two minutes twelve seconds. Broadcast on WFPL 12/15/05


Interstitials (Under 2:00)

Is Your Desk Trying to Kill You?

From Merle Kessler | 01:46

A new study reveals that a messy desk can make you sick. Ian examines his own desk/health ratio, and reaches some conclusions.

Default-piece-image-2 A new study reveals that a messy desk can make you sick. Ian examines his own desk/health ratio, and reaches some conclusions.