%s1 / %s2

Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

Caption: PRX default Playlist image
No text

The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

336: It's About Time, 5/22/2020

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 58:59

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small Can it be true that just over two months ago, we were sitting through meetings at work, spending our evenings out at concerts, maybe planning trips for the summer? Has it really been just over two months since life changed so dramatically? And yet, every pandemic day seems to fly by in a flash, marked only by Zoom meeting after Zoom meeting. The pandemic has warped and stretched time in strange ways, and this week, we listen back to our episode on time. In many ways, time is a human construct. We have chosen ways to measure it, to parse it out, to track it. But time is also an experience that can vary wildly from one moment to the next — the minutes that stretch endlessly, the hours that fly by. On this episode, we explore time — how we measure it, how we experience it, and how it bends and warps in our minds.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2020-05-22 COVID-19 and Climate: The Future of Energy

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:56

Prx-covid_energy_small

Host: Greg Dalton

Guests:
Amy Harder, Energy Reporter, Axios
Jason Bordoff, Founding Director, Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University
Scott Jacobs, CEO and Co-founder, Generate Capital
Julia Pyper, Host and Producer, Political Climate Podcast

Additional interview: Chris Rawlings, founder of Veteran L.E.D.

This program was recorded via video on May 6, 2020.

If you lived through the oil crisis of the 1970’s, you remember lines of cars at the gas stations, waiting to fill up on “alternate days.” Now, after decades of relying on imported oil, the U.S. achieved the unthinkable and became the world’s largest producer. Production has doubled over the past decade, and in February reached its highest level ever - thirteen million barrels a day.

But as it turns out, all of that overabundance, combined with the current coronavirus pandemic, has led to a different kind of oil crisis.

“We’re producing more oil and gas than ever and this industry’s stocks are tanking,” says Amy Harder, energy reporter for Axios. “And that was because they have basically drilled their way into financial hell where there’s obviously zero coordination. 

“So everybody is just producing more and more oil and there’s too much oil in the world before demand dropped off a cliff.”

The nationwide shut-down caused by COVID-19 has taken its toll on the economy, with the fossil fuel industry being one of the biggest losers.

“Normally you would see prices fall, people would stop investing and start to have some declines in production,” says Jason Bordoff of the Center on Global Energy Policy. “We don't have enough places physically to store all of this oil that was being produced.”

But not all kinds of energy are suffering the same. As Harder explains, renewables are experiencing unprecedented growth.

“And now that it exists all over the world,” she continues, “it's going to be the plant that stays running when, you know, countries and companies can shut down coal and natural gas plants.”

What will be the lasting impact of the COVID-19 recession? How will this reshape use of clean energy sources in the years to come?

In a post-pandemic world, we can hardly expect that everything will return to the way it was before. Until a reliable vaccine is developed, air travel, retail shopping, dining out, going to school and other aspects of life will be drastically altered to reduce the risk of infection. Rather than striving for the green workplace of the future, many companies may decide that the future means no workplace at all.

“I think it’s just a step too far removed to try to make the argument that buildings need to be more energy efficient in this new world,” says Harder. “I think …companies might be looking to invest less in their buildings and more in telework opportunities.”

 

RELATED LINKS:

Oil prices go below zero (Bloomberg)

Political Climate podcast

Carbon emissions, oil and more (Axios)

Columbia Center on Global Energy Policy

Generate Capital

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Sun Dog (#1507)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

Sundog_small Carrie from Waupaca, Wisconsin, confesses she was stumped when that her son Aidan asked,"Mom, can you do a winter pepper?"

An ad campaign featuring the phrase The Last Straw urging people not to use plastic straws has Allie in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, wondering about double meanings in advertising. Research shows that such punning can be effective.

On Twitter, @laureneoneal wonders why the term ob-gyn is pronounced by sounding out all the letters, as if it's an initialism.

Eleven-year-old Ben calls from Rapids City to ask about the term sun dog, the meterological phenomenon in which a bright spot appears to the left or right of the sun. No one knows the origin of this term. Synonyms include mock sun, weather gall, and parhelion, from Greek words meaning beside the sun.

Some 50 years ago, says Susan from Burbank, California, she and a friend made up a game involving prefixes and suffixes, which led to such nonsense words as epidormithry and postpreparize.

Ever notice how many comic-book villains have names ending in the letter O? For starters,  there's Magneto, Sinestro, and Bizarro. Quiz Guy John Chaneski's puzzle features new villains with names that are common words ending in -o. For example, who's the villain who takes large islands and breaks them up into chains of smaller islands?

Barbara in Cardiff-by-the-Sea, California, wonders about the term mob scene, means an unruly, dense crowd. The term arose in the world of theater, where it denotes a point in a performance with lots of people onstage. The word mob is a shortening of Latin mobile vulgus, which means fickle crowd.

The phrase throw in the towel, meaning to give up, originated in the world of boxing. An earlier phrase from the same sport that carried the same metaphorical meaning is chuck in the sponge.

Andrew in Omaha, Nebraska, recalls his grandfather's use of the word George to mean exceptionally good, and Double George to mean really great. Other masculine names, including Jake, Tom, and Jerry have meant something similar. In the 1950s, the name George was used among casino workers for a high roller, as in Here comes George.

The German word for longjohns, Liebestoter, literally means love killer.

Rick calls from Rouses Point, New York, to ask about the etymology of the phrase hang for a sheep as for a lamb, meaning go for broke or go all out. The answer has involves the old tradition of capital punishment for theft. Given the risk of such dire consequences, one might as well steal the item that's more valuable. There's a similar Scots proverb that goes as well be hanged for a wedder as for a lamb, a wedder being a male castrated sheep. The word wedder is linguistically related to bellwether, a large, castrated sheep wearing a bell and therefore indicative of where the herd is going.

Our conversation about being criticized for using yes ma'am and no sir, prompted a letter from an Austin, Texas, listener who had a similar experience when she moved from Mississippi to Ohio.

The state of Idaho has a large community of Basque speakers. Their native tongue is what's known as a language isolate, meaning one that is not historically connected to those around it.

The name George derives from the Greek word for farmer, a combination of words that literally mean earth worker.

Ellen in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, wonders about the origin of the exclamation Geezum Pete! It's a minced oath -- that is a way of avoiding saying Jesus Christ! There are dozens of similar euphemized exclamations, including gee willikins, jiminy, Jehosaphat, Judas Priest, Jeekers, Jiminy Cricket, Jiminy Crickets, Gee willikers, Gee Christmas, Jiminy Christmas, and Jerusalem.

Michael in Papillion, Nebraska, asks: Why do we refer to that adjustable vent that regulates air flow in a home as a register?

This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR125: OHR Presents: The Bluegrastronauts, 6/8/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Bluegrastronauts_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, blast off with the Matchsellers’ “Bluegrastronauts,” the world’s first outer-space bluegrass odyssey, recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Mixing elements of tall tales, theater, science fiction and bluegrass, the Bluegrastonauts show isn’t quite like anything you’ve ever heard. 

The Matchsellers are Warsaw, Indiana native Andrew Morris and Julie Bates of Kansas City, Missouri. Their exciting, gritty, and often hilarious stage show has been developed over six years of touring across the US and Europe.  Performing at the Ozark Folk Center State Park, Andrew and Julie present their outer-space bluegrass odyssey with a four piece stringband, featuring Chad Graves of The Hillbenders on dobro, and Betsey Mae on bass.  The group combines absurdity, authenticity, and excellent musicianship to create a performance that is representative of the present age:  They are pleasantly stuck between the years gone by and those to come.

The Matchsellers’ Bluegrastronauts is old-time in outer space.  It’s a far away galaxy as close as your first cousin.  It’s a 100,000-mile-an-hour horse and buggy.  Dressed as space travelers from the year 2437, the Matchsellers’ Bluegrastronauts take audiences through a musical “history of the future,” including a first-hand account of the Apocalypse of 2137, the subsequent colonization of the moon, and the dangers of playing hopscotch in deep space.  The show reaches the heights of absurdity while confronting deeply humanist issues of love, disillusionment, and mortality.  Prepare to travel through space and old-time with one of the most unique and ambitious acts in acoustic music today.
  - https://thematchsellers.com/bluegrastronauts-band/ 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1978 recording of mountain dulcimer master David Schnaufer performing the traditional tune “Red Haired Boy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 20-21: Consolidation Leads To Fragility--Elizabeth Dunn On Meatpacking And COVID-19, 5/22/2020

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 29:00

Ee_logo_small

“Until we can figure out how to do small scale processing and small scale distribution, we can’t have small scale farming”
This week on our show we talk with IU Professor Elizabeth Dunn, who has studied the meatpacking industry for more than a decade. She offers insights into recent outbreaks of COVID-19 in meat processing plants, and into the role of immigrant labor in our food system.


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

622: Home School, 5/30/2020

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | :00

no audio file

With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Take Me Out to the Ballgame (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

Baseball-stadium-crowd-people-diamond-field-380x254_small

“Take Me Out To The Ball Game” is the most popular song in American sports, but did you know that the woman who inspired its creation was a feminist Vaudeville actress of the 1920's?

And: Before the pandemic struck, Nick Heath was a rugby announcer in England. Now that rugby games are shut down, his hilarious play-by-play videos of everyday activities have gone viral. 

Are We Alone?

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:59

If there is intelligent life beyond Earth, how would that change life ON Earth?

31c3eoqqzxl

News that life might exist or have existed on Mars or somewhere else in our universe excites many. But should we really be happy to hear that news? What are the philosophical implications of the possibility of extraterrestrial life? If life can blossom in our own cosmic backyard, then that means that the universe is most likely saturated with life forms. And if that’s the case, why haven’t we found any evidence of other civilizations? Is it because all civilizations are prone to suicidal destruction at a certain point in their development? If so, how might we avoid this fate? The Philosophers search for life with Paul Davies from Arizona State University, author of The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Celebrating 30 Years of Hubble with Astronaut John Grunsfeld

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Stsci-h-p2016a-m-2000x1374_hubble_30th_cosmic_reef_small_small Former astronaut and NASA Associate Administrator John Grunsfeld is often called the Hubble Repairman. He made three space shuttle trips to the space telescope to repair and upgrade it. Now he looks back over three decades of science, beautiful images, and inspiration delivered by the HST. Rubber asteroids are back, and you might win one in the new What’s Up space trivia contest. Great links, including to Mat Kaplan’s live interview with John Grunsfeld, are at https://www.planetary.org/multimedia/planetary-radio/show/2020/0527-2020-john-grunsfeld-hubble-30th.html

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

Walk_to_walk_small

Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 05/22/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Lp2_small This week on the show: we examine personal choice in relation to CO2 emissions and other environmental issues. What changes have we made in our homes and lives to reduce our impacts on the Earth? And how much do these decisions actually matter amidst the global realities of climate change?

Tara Austin

From KUMD | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
KUMD

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 200529 11PM: ClassicalWorks (Episode 54), 5/29/2020 11:00 PM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 58:59

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 54)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse, LLC.

Most recent piece in this series:

1709.3: Jazz with David Basse 1709.3, 5/29/2020 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse, LLC. | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 59:53

Thumbnail_copy_small Jazz with David Basse

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

Yo-Yo Ma's Bach

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 58:30

Yymprx_small The force of art to rescue a world breaking down; the power of music in particular to heal people one by one, perhaps all together: this was Yo-Yo Ma’s breathtaking mission for himself in his 60s, to nail down the convictions that have sustained his humble self at the very pinnacle of major-league music. His project, nearly finished, was to do 36 concerts in 36 venues, from the top of the world in the Andes, to the street music scene in Dakar, West Africa, and to Flint, Michigan, in Rustbelt, USA. Everywhere he would play the same masterpiece: the Cello Suites of Johann Sebastian Bach, the rarest solo performance piece that can show you infinity. 

Imagine an old artistic masterpiece that’s also a modern showpiece for a solo performer who fills giant venues, East and West, indoors and out, in Chile and China, in Africa and the Andes, with audiences that seem to sit breathless for most of two and a half hours. The thought this radio hour is that there’s nothing in written music quite like the six suites for unaccompanied cello that Johann Sebastian Bach wrote, between his church assignments, right about 300 years ago. God’s own dance music, it’s been said, and there’s nobody who can produce a civic and cultural event each time he plays them as our guest Yo-Yo Ma has been doing: a sort of one-man dance band alone on the stage, no helpers for harmony or rhythm.
 

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions I21: Pianist Eldar Rhapsodizes and Singer-Trumpeter Ginetta Has A Vendetta

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Djangirov_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, new music from pianist Eldar Djangirov and his trio on the album "Rhapsodize." Although his name sounds like the English word "elder," Eldar started as a child prodigy, and is now only in his early 30s. Also: some bluesy sounds from the band Ginetta's Vendetta, led by trumpeter and singer Ginetta Minichiello on a new album "Pocketful Of Cool" (she plays a pocket trumpet), and, Gerry Gibbs plays all the instruments on "Emotional Pandemic," an album he wrote and recorded after the COVID-19 virus closed the concert venues and clubs. Plus: trumpeter Avishai Cohen and his band Big Vicious, taking on Beethoven.

promo included: promo-I21

Blue Dimensions G43: A Trinity Of "Presence"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Three recent albums all entitled "Presence," from Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, John Petrucelli, and Brad Whitely.

Evans_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we are surprised to note that three jazz albums entitled "Presence" have come out in 2018, and we've decided to draw music from all three of them - - one from pianist Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, some high-energy stuff recorded in concert at two jazz clubs in Philadelphia, one from pianist Brad Whitely, a strong studio recording, and another live one, a double album from saxophonist and composer John Petrucelli with lots of strings and a scallop shell used as an instrument as well. Three engaging and very different albums, all called "Presence," coming up in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: promo-G43

Feminine Fusion (Series)

Produced by WCNY

Most recent piece in this series:

S04 Ep39: Patchwork Quilt, Part XX, 5/30/2020

From WCNY | Part of the Feminine Fusion series | :00

no audio file

Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWF 19-26: Kissingen Summer, 3/23/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:56

J_rvi_small We train the microphone on one of today's most exciting conductors and on a brilliant young Russian singer: Paavo Järvi and Julia Lezhneva both perform and share their thoughts on this program from the festival Kissingen Summer.

High Country Celtic Radio (Series)

Produced by High Country Celtic Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

High Country Celtic Radio 113 - Memorial Day

From High Country Celtic Radio | Part of the High Country Celtic Radio series | 59:00

High-country-celtic-240x240_medium_small

Memorial Day in the US marks the unofficial start to summer, complete with barbecues and family picnics. But it's a holiday that marks the solemn commemoration of those who died in battles. Celtic music is renowned for its songs celebrating those that fight in wars over the centuries and the sorrow of those left behind. The years may change but the reality of war remains the same. 
This week, Katie and Joe play tracks from Ar Re Yaouank, Niamh Parsons, Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh, Mick Moloney-Jimmy Keane-Robbie O'Connell with Liz Carroll, Colleen Raney, Ruth Keggin, Frank Harte & Donal Lunny, FullSet, Christy Moore, Mason & Weed, The Wolfe Tones, Shantalla, and Gordon Duncan.
Our FairPlé score this week is 46.  

406: Celebrating the Birthday of Bucky Pizzarelli, 1/1/2019

From KCUR | Part of the 12th Street Jump Weekly series | 59:00

(Air Dates: December 31 - January 8) On this week's archive episode of 12th Street Jump, we celebrate the music of Bucky Pizzarelli with Bucky himself and his long time music partner Ed Laub. We'll play a game of "So, What's Your Question" with Ed and talk to Bucky about what gives him the blues.

Bucky-pizzarelli-08_small

Public Radio's weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, 12th STREET JUMP celebrates America's original art form, live from one of its birthplaces, 12th Street in Kansas City. That is where Basie tickled and ivories and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues. Each week, host Ebony Fondren offers up a lively hour of topical sketch comedy and some great live jazz and blues from the 12th STREET JUMP band (musical director Joe Cartright, along with Tyrone Clark on bass and Arnold Young on drums) and vocalist David Basse. Special guests join the fun every week down at the 12th Street Jump.

Latin Jazz Perspective (T-5)

From Tony Vasquez | Part of the Latin Perspective - Latin Jazz Hour (weekly) series | 59:01

A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.

Yvettei_small A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.
This week edition is a special presentation on the Latin Jazz Flute.
Featuring Latin /Latin Jazz flautists from the past and present who where a major force
in the historical continuum of the music.

Notes from the Jazz Underground #44 - Jazz in Chicago, 2019

From WDCB | Part of the Notes from the Jazz Underground series | 58:00

With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.

Nftju_logo_small_small With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.