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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

292: The Other Side of the Moon, 7/19/2019

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 58:59

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small With the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, we’ve been talking a lot about getting to the moon, and the science of understanding its origins. This episode is more of a tribute to the moon itself, and our relationship with this bright, beautiful object in the sky. The moon lights up our nights, it influences the oceans’ tides, it stabilizes the earth’s tilt — which is responsible for our seasons. Without the moon, our lives here on earth would be very, very different. On this episode of The Pulse, we pay homage to all the moon does — and delve into our relationship with the moon.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2019-07-19 The Fate of Food

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:58

Prx_fate_of_food_small Host: Greg Dalton

Guests:
Twilight Greenaway, Contributing Editor, Civil Eats
Amanda Little, Professor of Journalism, Vanderbilt University

How will we feed a planet that’s hotter, drier, and more crowded than ever? Much of it starts with innovators who are trying to re-invent the global food system to be more productive and nutritious. Vanderbilt University Journalism professor Amanda Little chronicles some of these efforts in her new book, The Fate of Food: What We'll Eat in a Bigger, Hotter, Smarter World.

“We see disruption in the auto industry, we see disruption in tobacco – disruption is coming in the meat industry,” says Little, noting how conventional meat companies have been investing in technologies to produce cell-based meat without animals.

Other technological innovations, such as robots that can deploy herbicide with sniper-like precision, can help push agriculture toward more sustainable practices. But she also notes the difficulties that food startups face in getting their products to scale – which often means selling to large, industrial producers.

“We need the sort of good guys and bad guys to collaborate,” she says. “It doesn't mean that that is disrupting the, you know, the rise of local food webs and farmers markets and CSAs and locally sourced foods.  It means maybe this is a way of bringing more intelligent practices to industrial ag.”

Twilight Greenaway, a contributing editor with Civil Eats, amplifies these concerns about tech disruption in the food space. “Will there be some [technology] that really can feed into a more democratic food system that allows for different types of ownership less concentrated ownership,” she asks, noting that some startups start out with the goal of selling to a large company.

She likens the current conversation to earlier discussions about the organic farming movement leading to little more than an organic Twinkie. “There’s a lot to say about changing practices on the land and what organic means in terms of pesticides and other environmental benefits,” she cautions, “but on the other hand, you’ll still end up with the Twinkie.”

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

A Shoo-In (#1475)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

Butterfly_small Hiking in the mountains, Martha kept noticing butterflies at about 4,000-to-5,000 feet above sea level. Those butterflies are hilltopping. It’s when male butterflies of many species go to high points to advertise their fortitude and genes to the female butterflies.


Judy in Huntsville, Alabama, has hundreds of song lyrics playing on auto-shuffle in her head. When the Polka Dot Polka started playing, she began to wonder how polka dots came to be associated with the music. It turns out that the polka dance craze of the early 1800s — named after the Polish word for a Polish woman — gave its name to a lot of things, including this fabric pattern.


Writing advice from Mark Twain, who was not a fan of adjectives. In The Tragedy of Pudd'nhead Wilson, he says, “As to the adjective, when in doubt, strike it out.” He also wrote a letter with clever, useful advice that still holds true for the modern writer.


When you would ask the father of Chris from Reno, Nevada, something to which he thought the answer was obvious, he’d answer with jokey phrases like “Is a pig pork?” or “Is the Pope Catholic?” or “Does a bear poop in the woods?” (but with a different verb!). These sarcastic interrogatives, also known as a kind of echo question, are wonderfully discussed in an article by Charles Clay Doyle titled “Is the Pope Still Catholic?” in the journal Western Folklore. (The article is free with registration.)


The Greek word for the cuckoo bird, kokkux, is related to our word coccyx, the tailbone, because the bone looks like the bill of a cuckoo.


Our New York City quiz guy John Chaneski joins us for a punny word quiz. How to play: There’s a pun with a key word missing. You need to fill in the blank. For example, if you don’t pay your e_______, you get repossessed. The answer: exorcist. Get it?


Steve in Bend, Oregon, asks: Does bully pulpit mean what people think it means? Is the bully the same as the bully you might find in a schoolyard? What did Teddy Roosevelt really mean when he said he had a bully pulpit? There’s an old meaning that has fallen away that changes how we understand the phrase.


Hamid in San Diego, California, says that his wife is a job recruiter who finds people to fill high-profile positions. She will come home and say, “This candidate’s a shoo-in.” What’s the story with shoo-in? Where does it come from? It has something to do with an old slang term for rigging a horse race. It’s not, shoe-in, by the way, although that is a common misspelling, and it has nothing to do with footwear. There are many everyday terms that come from horse-racing, such as the term hands-down.


Growing up in Kentucky, where the state religion seems to be basketball, Martha played a lot of rounds of horse, where players compete to make baskets from the same court positions, shot for shot. If you miss, you get a letter from the word horse. If you get all the letters, you lose. Basketball star Steph Curry instead challenged a bunch of high school students to a game of sesquipedalian. We’ve talked about long words like that before.


Rodney in Suffolk, Virginia, is interested in the word tattoo. His grandmother didn’t use it to mean skin art. She used it to rave about seeing a great concert or band: “It was just such a wonderful tattoo!” It might have something to do with a musical military tradition involving a tattoo (of Dutch origin) that is unrelated to the skin tattoo (which has a Tahitian origin).


A belly flower is a small low-growing flower you have to get down on the ground to see.


Martha recommends Pax, by Sara Pennypacker, a book targeted at children but in which adults will find much to admire and mull over. In preparing the book, Pennypacker spent a great deal of time studying the behavior of foxes. Martha shares a particularly perfect passage.


Zach from Plano, Texas, watched the documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi. In it, a protegé of the star sushi chef ends a long explanation about how much he’s learned from his mentor by saying, “I don’t sleep with my feet in his direction.” What does this Japanese expression it mean?


Man-eating spiders! Martha tells a charming story about how illustrators and authors work together when they make children’s books.


Greg, calling from Norfolk, Virginia, says that when he uses the word smarmy, some people seem not to know it. What does it mean? Where does it come from? Is it even a real word? It’s related to an old verb meaning to smear or be-daub. It’s kind of like the word unctuous.


Andrea in Haslett, Michigan, and her six-year-old daughter Neevee had a question about the way we show love in writing. When they were texting back and forth with Neevee’s daddy, she got to wondering where where we get X and O for kisses and hugs. It may have something to do with the way people used to sign and kiss important documents, and the Christian cross.


Plot bunnies are writing ideas that you can’t get rid of. The only way to purge yourself of the ideas is to write them!


This episode is hosted by Martha Barnette and Grant Barrett, and produced by Stefanie Levine.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Mx101 Ep64: Stevie Wonder (Part 2), 7/18/2019

From KUNC & The Colorado Sound | Part of the Music 101 series | 57:00

Music_101_recent_small Stevie Wonder is not only one of the best-selling music artists of all time, but he's also won 25 Grammy Awards. He's a member of the Rock and Rock Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame. His career is legendary and his influence on music is immense. This week we once again delve into Stevie Wonder's career and influence in the second part of a two-part episode.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR015: OHR Presents: Bing Futch, 7/22/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, International Blues Challenge award winning Dulcimer maven Bing Futch recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Bing, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of authentic Ozark fiddler Sam Younger.

Bing Futch is a new breed of talent in the world of the mountain dulcimer.  While he performs traditional dulcimer tunes, his influences from all areas of music have been adapted to his dulcimer playing, including the use of effects pedals and other whiz-bang electronic stuff.  He is a regular contributor and instructor at the Annual Dulcimer Jamboree at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Bing was recently won best guitarist at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis, Tennessee and yes, he was playing his dulcimer.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and an enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on the roots music aspect of the Ozark Folk Center State Park, and it’s mission to preserve the old Ozark ways.

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of authentic Ozark fiddler Sam Younger,  performing the traditional song “Turkey in the Straw,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 19-28: The Belly Of A Pretzel, 7/12/2019

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 29:00

Ee_logo_small

“If you want to be very artistic about it, you want to leave a little knob of dough at the end--so it’s got this fat belly in the middle and then these skinny arms that taper out to the end, and then a little bit of a knob right there.”  --Eric Schedler

On today’s show, we learn how to make German-style soft pretzels from Eric Schedler of Muddy Fork Bakery.

Josephine McRobbie sends an audio postcard from a backyard chicken coop tour,

and Harvest Public Media has a story on midwestern aquaculture.


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio (Series)

Produced by Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

223: Insider's Italy: An Off-The-Grid Travel Guide with Matt Goulding, 7/18/2019

From Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio | Part of the Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio series | 53:58

Msl_radio_logo_cobrand_prx_small Matt Goulding, author of “Pasta, Pane, Vino,” lets us in on Italy’s best-kept secrets. Plus, Liz Alpern and Jeffrey Yoskowitz present “The Gefilte Manifesto,” a definitive guide to modern Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine; we prepare Taiwanese Grilled Corn; and Dan Pashman tells us about his trip to the Library of Congress Cooking Club. (Originally aired Aug. 2, 2018. Available for rerun July 18 to July 25, 2019.)

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

529: Sins of the Fathers, 7/20/2019

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | :00

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With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Reviving the Giant Oysters (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 28:59

Oyster-reef_small From tracking tigers in Nepal to mountainside surgery on Montana’s wolverines, Deborah McCauley is on a mission to save disappearing wildlife around the world. And: Fossils give away the secrets of the past, but they can also tell the future. Rowan Lockwood is taking a closer look at the fossils of giant oysters to learn how to rebuild oyster reefs today. 

Are We Alone?

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:59

If there is intelligent life beyond Earth, how would that change life ON Earth?

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News that life might exist or have existed on Mars or somewhere else in our universe excites many. But should we really be happy to hear that news? What are the philosophical implications of the possibility of extraterrestrial life? If life can blossom in our own cosmic backyard, then that means that the universe is most likely saturated with life forms. And if that’s the case, why haven’t we found any evidence of other civilizations? Is it because all civilizations are prone to suicidal destruction at a certain point in their development? If so, how might we avoid this fate? The Philosophers search for life with Paul Davies from Arizona State University, author of The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Apollo 11 and the Woman Who Helped Get It Home

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Poppy-northcutt-first-woman-mission-control_small_small Poppy Northcutt was a pioneer—the first woman to work as an engineer in Apollo Mission Control. The program she helped to create got the astronauts back to Earth.  Fifty years later, she sits down with Mat Kaplan for a look back. You’ll also hear Apollo moonwalker Buzz Aldrin at a 50th anniversary celebration. And we’ll get a LightSail 2 update from Bruce Betts. Learn more about this week’s topics at:  http://www.planetary.org/multimedia/planetary-radio/show/2019/0717-2019-poppy-northcutt-apollo.html

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

Walk_to_walk_small

Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 07/19/2019

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Lp1_small This week on the show: Life's a beach - Summer is a time of sun, sea, and sand. But sand isn't just the stuff of beach holidays — we hear how it's being used in East Africa and with what impact. We also pay a visit to a town in Italy that is inundated by cruise ships, and we join a scientific expedition studying warming temperatures in the deep ocean.

Tara Austin

From KUMD | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
KUMD

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 190724 11PM: ClassicalWorks (Episode 400), 7/24/2019 11:00 PM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 58:59

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 400)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse LLC

Most recent piece in this series:

1548.2: Jazz with David Basse 1548.2, 8/15/2019 1:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse LLC | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 59:53

Jwdb_small Jazz with David Basse

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

Casino Capital

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 59:00

Casinoprx_small

Casino gambling makes an odd fit with old bean-and-codfish Boston, even with Boston today: the best big college town in the country, the leading edge of genomic medicine, the home address of sports champions and Red Sox Nation. And now it’s the home of Encore Boston Harbor, in the Steve Wynn chain of casino resorts. It’s an odd fit with the whole country, when you think about it: the licensed elevation of what used to be forbidden, isolated, mob-ridden.

We talked to the novelist Joshua Cohen to try to get a handle on all this. Cohen is from Atlantic City, and he spoke to us from that industry town about growing up among the casinos. He’s full of startling, tragic, funny insights into the casino business, an industry that’s increasingly moving into American cities beyond Vegas and Cohen’s hometown.

The first full-service gambling palace has been built in Boston, that old American cultural capital. It’s a giant leap for the very idea of gambling, where, as George Bernard Shaw said, “the many must lose in order that the few may win.” It’s not just a casino but a “world above,” it advertises: 600 5-star hotel rooms over thousands of card games and slot machines.  It’s the biggest single private development in 400 years of Massachusetts; with $77 million tossed in to clean up a stinking old Monsanto chemical dump. This hour we’re sharing the welcome we got at Encore Boston Harbor, and then the puzzlement about where it leads.   

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions H29: Catherine Russell's "Alone Together," and a hard look at slavery and racism from the album "Songs Of Our Native Daughters."

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Crussell_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, some spirited singing from three new albums - - a new album from the wonderful singer Catherine Russell called "Alone Together." Also, Gaye Adegbalola offers great singing and telling social commentary, as well a humor on her new album "The Griot," and, song and social commentary also come our way from Rhiannon Giddens with Leyla McCalla, Allison Russell, and Amythyst Kiah, who have recorded an album called "Songs Of Our Native Daughters." We'll also hear the latest from saxophonists Joshua Redman and Javon Jackson, all in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

Cat Russell had a long and successful career as a backing vocalist recording and performing with singers of all sorts, including Snoop Dogg, Dolly Parton, and Paul Simon, and she was a very prominent part of David Bowie's show for a while, both singing and playing percussion. She's the daughter of Luis Russell, Louis Armstrong's New York band leader, and Carline Ray who also was a singer and guitarist and bassist. Carline and daughter Catherine did an album together shortly before Carline's death in 2013. Catherine started her solo career with her album Cat in 2006, and Alone Together is her seventh album as a leader. She "sets the standard" for singing standards. Gaye Adegbalola's musical career began with a remarkable trio of women known as Saffire The Uppity Blueswomen, who provided some humor and thought-provoking ideas in the 1990s. Adegbalola has developed a unique solo act, with some very hard-hitting social commentary, spirited singing, and a dose of humor too. Rhiannon Giddens, who became known as a member of The Carolina Chocolate Drops and received a MacArthur Foundation fellowship for her work, has put together a powerful new album with Leyla McCalla, Allison Russell, and Amythyst Kiah that explores the horrors slavery and life for African-Americans after slavery.

We also have a couple of instrumental things coming up, a new piece from saxophonist Joshua Redman and his quartet, from an album coming out in March called "Come What May," and a tribute to Pharaoh Sanders from saxophonist Javon Jackson from his wonderful 2018 album "For You."

promo included: promo-H29

Blue Dimensions G43: A Trinity Of "Presence"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Three recent albums all entitled "Presence," from Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, John Petrucelli, and Brad Whitely.

Evans_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we are surprised to note that three jazz albums entitled "Presence" have come out in 2018, and we've decided to draw music from all three of them - - one from pianist Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, some high-energy stuff recorded in concert at two jazz clubs in Philadelphia, one from pianist Brad Whitely, a strong studio recording, and another live one, a double album from saxophonist and composer John Petrucelli with lots of strings and a scallop shell used as an instrument as well. Three engaging and very different albums, all called "Presence," coming up in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: promo-G43

Feminine Fusion (Series)

Produced by WCNY

Most recent piece in this series:

S03 Ep47: Three by Three, Part 2, 7/20/2019

From WCNY | Part of the Feminine Fusion series | :00

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Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWF 18-26: Baltic Sea, 3/25/2019

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:57

J_rvi_kristjan_ada8041da_small Ten countries border on the Baltic Sea: Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, Poland, Russia and Sweden. Proving that they are united, not separated by that body of water is the Baltic Sea Philharmonic with musicians from all ten, led by Kristjan Järvi, an exciting and innovative conductor whose programs are always standouts.

High Country Celtic Radio (Series)

Produced by High Country Celtic Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

High Country Celtic Radio 069 - Apollo 11: A Lunar Tribute

From High Country Celtic Radio | Part of the High Country Celtic Radio series | 59:00

High-country-celtic-240x240_medium_small This week, Katie and Joe are on the road, but they planned ahead and brought their favorite CDs with them. This week, they pay a Celtic musical tribute to the 50th anniversary of the astounding journey of Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins (!) on board Apollo 11 as they embarked on a perilous journey to the moon. 

This week's lunar tribute is Cherish the Ladies, Alan Reid and Rachel Conlon, Shannon, Crosscurrent, Mary Bergin, John Doyle & Liz Carroll, The Ceili Bandits, Damien Connolly, Luar na Lubre, Padraig Rynne, Socks in the Frying Pan, and The Fire.

406: Celebrating the Birthday of Bucky Pizzarelli, 1/1/2019

From KCUR | Part of the 12th Street Jump Weekly series | 59:00

(Air Dates: December 31 - January 8) On this week's archive episode of 12th Street Jump, we celebrate the music of Bucky Pizzarelli with Bucky himself and his long time music partner Ed Laub. We'll play a game of "So, What's Your Question" with Ed and talk to Bucky about what gives him the blues.

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Public Radio's weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, 12th STREET JUMP celebrates America's original art form, live from one of its birthplaces, 12th Street in Kansas City. That is where Basie tickled and ivories and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues. Each week, host Ebony Fondren offers up a lively hour of topical sketch comedy and some great live jazz and blues from the 12th STREET JUMP band (musical director Joe Cartright, along with Tyrone Clark on bass and Arnold Young on drums) and vocalist David Basse. Special guests join the fun every week down at the 12th Street Jump.

Latin Jazz Perspective (T-5)

From Tony Vasquez | Part of the Latin Perspective - Latin Jazz Hour (weekly) series | 59:01

A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.

Yvettei_small A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.
This week edition is a special presentation on the Latin Jazz Flute.
Featuring Latin /Latin Jazz flautists from the past and present who where a major force
in the historical continuum of the music.