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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

346: The Cost of Beauty, 7/31/2020

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 58:59

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small Health and beauty may go together in the drugstore — but in real life, the two aren’t always so simpatico. From excessive dieting to plastic surgery and chemical peels, looking good comes at a cost — to our wallets, our health, and our overall well-being. But in recent years, more people are starting to rethink mainstream beauty standards. Where did they come from? Who do they hurt? And what are we willing to risk to meet them? On this episode of The Pulse, we investigate our own ideas of beauty, and how they relate to health. We hear stories about the potential dangers of hair dye, the bane of “maskne,” and why more men are opting for nips and tucks.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2020-07-31 The Future Earth: Eric Holthaus and Katharine Wilkinson

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:57

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Host: Greg Dalton

Guests:
Eric Holthaus, Author, The Future Earth: A Radical Vision for What's Possible in the Age of Warming (HarperOne, 2020)
Katharine Wilkinson, Vice President, Project Drawdown

Additional Speaker: Michael Méndez, assistant professor of environmental planning and policy at the University of California, Irvine 

This program was recorded via video on July 1, 2020.

Science has given us a realistic picture of what Earth will look like with unmitigated climate change: increased extreme weather events, crippled economies, and a world where those with the least are the hardest hit. But are those outcomes inevitable? Eric Holthaus doesn’t think so. In his book The Future Earth,´Holthaus argues that the solutions are all available to us.

“There is so much that we can still do that actually, it's sort of misleading to think of it as being a lost cause - because it’s not,” he says.

“I mean the most depressing thing is that we waited so long to handle it. But that's in the past, you can't really do much about it at this point other than decide that that's even more motivation to make the change right away.”

The Future Earth imagines a time two to three decades in the future, one in which the Green New Deal has become a reality, fossil fuel burning is criminalized and carbon emissions have been reduced to zero. And it offers a hopeful take on a topic that many find depressing.

Even the most passionate activists can occasionally face dread, hopelessness, crippling climate anxiety. While those feelings can stand in the way of action, Katharine Wilkinson, Vice President of Project Drawdown, reminds us that they’re also part of the journey.

“How do we mourn and imagine, right?” she asks rhetorically. “How do we feel fear and feel determination? Maybe most of all, how do we link arms and keep each other going, because we’re probably not gonna have the fire in the belly ourselves every day.”

By creating community and sharing those feelings, Wilkinson says, “you can rely on each other and feed off each other…having an ecosystem of all these different people and entities and organizations that are involved in this great transformation effort is so critical.”

 

Related Links:

Project Drawdown

The Future Earth: A Radical Vision for What’s Possible in the Age of Warming (Eric Holthaus)

Climate Change from the Streets: How Conflict and Collaboration Strengthen the Environmental Justice Movement (Michael Méndez)

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Howling Fantods (#1513)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

11029424_d2f874b836_m_small On Twitter, columnist Shannon Proudfoot asks: What's the most mundane but thunderous epiphany you ever had? Something so ridiculously dull or elementary that still bowled you over when you figured it out? Some of the answers had to do with misunderstandings about language, including the meaning of guerilla warfare, AM radio stations, and money laundering.


Sarah from Grove City, Pennsylvania, says her husband had no idea what she meant when she said she wanted to make over him. The verb to make over means to be affectionate. The terms make of and to make on have long meant to value highly or treat with great consideration. 


Viewers of the movie First Man, about the Gemini space program, may be surprised to learn that within National Aeornautics and Space Administration, the name Gemini is pronounced more like JEM-in-nee. Gemini is the Latin word for twin, and the source of the Spanish word for twins, gemelos.


James in San Diego, California, wonders about the origin of the word sploot, which refers to the way cute cuddly animals, such as Corgis, lie on their bellies with their back legs splayed out. Other terms for this include frog legs, frog dog, furry turkey, drumsticks, turkey legs, chicken legs, Supermanning, pancaking, flying squirrel, and frogging. The origins of sploot are murky, although it may be connected with splat. There's a whole subreddit for all your splooting needs.


Quiz Guy John Chaneski's puzzle is involves weather terms hidden inside longer words. For example, suppose he's going to the store to buy some stuff -- nothing in particular, just various objects that are too small and unimportant to mention separately. How's the weather?


Cory in Newark, Ohio, says that while in South Africa, he heard the exclamation Shot! used in an empathetic way to mean That's so sweet! or Bless your heart! In South Africa, the word can be used to express agreement, and in Australia, the expression That's the shot! expresses approval. In boxing, a skillful punch might be commended with Oh, shot!


Inspired by a Twitter thread about things people learned surprisingly late in life, Martha relates an extremely embarrassing story of her own about her misunderstanding how beer is made.


Rebecca from San Diego, California, wants to know the origin of the verb to bogart, as in Don't bogart that salad dressing! It's associated the forcefulness of matinee idol Humphrey Bogart.


Masha in Vergennes, Vermont, says her family uses the word ilk to refer to a variety or type, as in What ilk of tree is that? Is this term is now archaic?


Sarah Smarsh, author of Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth, advises that although would-be writers should read extensively, it's even more important to listen intensely.


Sharon in Kaukauna, Wisconsin, says that when her father wanted his children to stop squirming, he used to say You're just like a fart in a mitten. Versions of this term for something moving around feature a fart in a colander, a blender, a hot skillet, a jacuzzi, a spaceship, a submarine, a phone box, and an elevator.


Shannon Proudfoot's tweet about thunderous epiphanies later in life prompted a response about misunderstanding the meaning of the term surgical dressing.


David Foster Wallace's book Infinite Jest, includes many unusual turns of phrase, including nose-pore-range for something very close, toadbelly white for a particular shade of the color, howling fantods for the heebie-jeebies, and greebles for disintegrated bits of Kleenex. Grant worked with Wallace on the Oxford American Writer's Thesaurus, for which Wallace supplied some usage notes.


Our discussion about proper salutations for business letters prompts Mary in Austin, Texas, to suggest beginning such correspondence with the neutral but emphatic Hark!


Maribel in Montgomery, Alabama, asks about why we say to boot to mean in addition. This kind of boot has nothing to do with the kind you wear on your feet. It's from Old English bot, meaning advantage or remedy, and is a linguistic relative of the English word better.


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR129: OHR Presents: Black Americana, 8/3/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Dom_flemons_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

In honor of Black History Month, OHR pays tribute to African Americans’ profound contribution to American music.  Forged into the roots of blues, jazz, pop, rock, soul, hip-hop, country, old-time and traditional folk, the influence of African American culture on the American musical landscape cannot be overestimated.  This week, we’ll present songs from a variety of modern world class African American performers of traditional American music, recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.

Featured on this special episode are Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton of PBS’ “American Epic,” Amythyst Kiah of Our Native Daughters (recorded live at Oxford American’s South on Main in Little Rock, AR,) Smithsonian Folkways recording artist Dom Flemons, blues and roots music legend Taj Mahal, Carolina Chocolate Drops and Our Native Daughters member Leyla McCalla, and Lela Mae Smith of the Jake Leg Stompers.

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater explores “The African American Banjo,” illuminating the African roots of this enduring musical instrument.  Aubrey takes us back to the source of the banjo with music and enlightening commentary.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 20-31: Coffee Farmers Diversify Crops, Rick Steves Supports Sustainable Farming, 7/31/2020

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 29:00

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“In the last year we took 30,000 people to Europe and frankly, I made too much money because I didn’t have to pay for the carbon we generated by flying those people to Europe and back.”

This week on our show we give a second listen to an interview with Rick Steves about a self imposed carbon tax on his European Travel company.

Leisure air travel has dropped off  due to the coronavirus pandemic, but when it resumes we’ll be looking for innovative practices to address climate change.

And we talk with Janice Nadworny of Food 4 Farmers about coffee growers shifting their farming practices for greater community food security. 


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

No One Cares Alone (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

Heart-4000934_960_720-100x100_small Sammy was just a month old when he started experiencing symptoms of heart failure. Dr. Mark Roeser helped perform the groundbreaking surgery that saved the boy’s life. And: Burnout is especially prevalent in the medical field. And Dr. Mark Greenawald should know, he felt its devastating effects after a patient of his died tragically while giving birth. Earlier this year, he created PeerRxMed to help health care workers identify and overcome burnout.

Are We Alone?

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:59

If there is intelligent life beyond Earth, how would that change life ON Earth?

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News that life might exist or have existed on Mars or somewhere else in our universe excites many. But should we really be happy to hear that news? What are the philosophical implications of the possibility of extraterrestrial life? If life can blossom in our own cosmic backyard, then that means that the universe is most likely saturated with life forms. And if that’s the case, why haven’t we found any evidence of other civilizations? Is it because all civilizations are prone to suicidal destruction at a certain point in their development? If so, how might we avoid this fate? The Philosophers search for life with Paul Davies from Arizona State University, author of The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Hope Leads the Way to Mars

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Emm_hope_07102019_-_emi_testing_small_small An exclusive conversation with science lead Sarah Al Amiri and project director Omran Sharaf of the Emirates Mars Mission.  Their Hope orbiter is now on its way to the red planet.  NASA Associate Administrator Thomas Zurbuchen has praise for the Emirates mission and looks forward to the beginning of the Perseverance rover’s own journey. Are you as good as NASA at creating acronyms? Take your best shot in the new What’s Up contest, as Bruce Betts waves farewell to comet NEOWISE. Learn more at https://www.planetary.org/planetary-radio/0729-2020-amiri-sharaf-emm-hop

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

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Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 07/31/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Lp1_small This week on the show: Endangered, in danger - How this year was again deadly for environmental defenders, dehorning rhinos to save them, and protecting the most endangered whale on Earth. Plus, COVID-19 challenges women working on environmental issues around the world.

Tara Austin

From KUMD | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
KUMD

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 200805 11PM: ClassicalWorks (Episode 436), 8/5/2020 11:00 PM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 58:59

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 436)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse, LLC.

Most recent piece in this series:

1724.3: Jazz with David Basse 1724.3, 8/7/2020 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse, LLC. | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 59:53

Thumbnail_copy_small Jazz with David Basse

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

Nicholson Baker Searches for Secrets

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 59:00

Nicholson_baker_photo_credt_elias_baker_small Nicholson Baker, prose writer beyond category, has a new book for COVID time, speaking directly to the dread of weaponized biology as only Nick Baker could treat it, in history and in his head. This is the same Nick Baker who wrote Vox, the phone-sex novel that Monica Lewinsky presented to Bill Clinton; the same Nick Baker who knocked Winston Churchill off a pedestal, and got away with it, in a pacifist’s retelling of World War 2 as an orgy of imperial killing: Human Smoke, he called it. It’s that Nick Baker, the historian of darkness, who’s back this summer, piecing the bio-war story together, not in Trump time, but Truman time, when the hard men of the security state fell in love with germs.

His new book is about a mad lust for bio-weapons, germ warfare, at the top of the US government in the 1950s. He's obsessive about extracting secret documents in the case, but his book about Project Baseless is only partly “documentary.”  It’s equally a sort of writer’s diary: what a deep dive into the secret science of mass killing does to an ordinary man, himself. Nick Baker’s a novelist and then some. On the model of I. F. Stone or Sy Hersh, he’s relentless in the fine print of public archives. He’s got John Updike’s musical prose, E. B. White’s wry American whimsy, and a lot of Karl Ove Knausgaard’s eye, ever on his own day-to-day doings in the shadow of vast historical nightmares.  

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions I31: Jason Marsalis Live — and Previously Unissued Art Blakey from 1959

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Marsalis_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, the youngest sibling in the magically talented Marsalis family of New Orleans is vibraphonist and composer Jason Marsalis, and we'll feature his new album "Jason Marsalis Live," recorded in 2017 at a New Orleans club and issued in 2020.  Also: new music from multi-instrumentalist and composer Derrick Hodge, his third album, entitled "Color Of Noize," with two great drummers at work, Michael Mitchell and Justin Tyson. We'll play two cuts from a previously unissued album of Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers from 1959 called "Just Coolin'" with Lee Morgan, Hank Mobley, Bobby Timmons, and Jymie Merritt in the band — plus, a piece from the great pianist Erroll Garner in the continuing reissue series of his Octave Label recordings.

promo included: promo-I31

Blue Dimensions G43: A Trinity Of "Presence"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Three recent albums all entitled "Presence," from Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, John Petrucelli, and Brad Whitely.

Evans_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we are surprised to note that three jazz albums entitled "Presence" have come out in 2018, and we've decided to draw music from all three of them - - one from pianist Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, some high-energy stuff recorded in concert at two jazz clubs in Philadelphia, one from pianist Brad Whitely, a strong studio recording, and another live one, a double album from saxophonist and composer John Petrucelli with lots of strings and a scallop shell used as an instrument as well. Three engaging and very different albums, all called "Presence," coming up in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: promo-G43

Feminine Fusion (Series)

Produced by WCNY

Most recent piece in this series:

S04 Ep49: One Life: Cecile Chaminade, 8/8/2020

From WCNY | Part of the Feminine Fusion series | :00

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Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWF 19-26: Kissingen Summer, 3/23/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:56

J_rvi_small We train the microphone on one of today's most exciting conductors and on a brilliant young Russian singer: Paavo Järvi and Julia Lezhneva both perform and share their thoughts on this program from the festival Kissingen Summer.

High Country Celtic Radio (Series)

Produced by High Country Celtic Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

High Country Celtic Radio 123 - Summer Weather

From High Country Celtic Radio | Part of the High Country Celtic Radio series | 59:00

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This week, it's a show with songs and tunes about summer meteorology. The source of inspiration occured the other day, when the high desert graced Joe's vegetable garden with blazing heat, high winds, a downpour, and finishing with two separate hailstorms, all as the mighty Carson River a few yards away swelled up in a flash flood.  
This week, we are also introducing our new theme music, Nuala Kennedy's "Glen Where The Deer Is, The Ivy Leaf, and The Dublin Lasses," used with her permission.
This week, we feature weather-related tracks from Maire Ni Ghrada; Altan; Sean Keane; Cillian Vallely; Méabh O'Hare & Conor Byrne; Flook; The Fire; Diwall; Matt Molloy, Paul Brady And Tommy Peoples; Sharon Shannon; John Redmon; Liz Doherty; Open The Door For Three; and Zoë Conway
Our FairPle score this week: 57 (that's good!)

406: Celebrating the Birthday of Bucky Pizzarelli, 1/1/2019

From KCUR | Part of the 12th Street Jump Weekly series | 59:00

(Air Dates: December 31 - January 8) On this week's archive episode of 12th Street Jump, we celebrate the music of Bucky Pizzarelli with Bucky himself and his long time music partner Ed Laub. We'll play a game of "So, What's Your Question" with Ed and talk to Bucky about what gives him the blues.

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Public Radio's weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, 12th STREET JUMP celebrates America's original art form, live from one of its birthplaces, 12th Street in Kansas City. That is where Basie tickled and ivories and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues. Each week, host Ebony Fondren offers up a lively hour of topical sketch comedy and some great live jazz and blues from the 12th STREET JUMP band (musical director Joe Cartright, along with Tyrone Clark on bass and Arnold Young on drums) and vocalist David Basse. Special guests join the fun every week down at the 12th Street Jump.

Latin Jazz Perspective (T-5)

From Tony Vasquez | Part of the Latin Perspective - Latin Jazz Hour (weekly) series | 59:01

A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.

Yvettei_small A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music. Hosted by Tony Vasquez.
This week edition is a special presentation on the Latin Jazz Flute.
Featuring Latin /Latin Jazz flautists from the past and present who where a major force
in the historical continuum of the music.

Notes from the Jazz Underground #44 - Jazz in Chicago, 2019

From WDCB | Part of the Notes from the Jazz Underground series | 58:00

With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.

Nftju_logo_small_small With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.