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Playlist: Poetry of Protest

Compiled By: wilson seaborn

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May 19th, 2011 Shomburg Symposium on Malcolm X: A Life of Re-Invention.

From Dred-Scott Keyes | 59:09

The Cutting Edge presents excerpts from a symposium on Malcolm X, held at the Shomburg Center after the release of the late Manning Marable's book,Malcolm X: A Life of Re-Invention.

Manning-prx-cover_small The Cutting Edge presents excerpts from a symposium on Malcolm x, held at the Shombyrg Center after the release of the late Manning Marable's book, :Malcolm X: A Life of Re-Invention. Features Bill Sales, Rosemary Mealy, Amina and Amiri Baraka and hosted by Sam Anderson.

“Black Detroit” A People’s History of Self-Determination”-

From Dred-Scott Keyes | Part of the The Cutting Edge series | 40:51

“Black Detroit” A People’s History of Self-Determination”- is a rich account of African-American history in Motown, written by award-winning journalist, Herb Boyd.

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As historians and activists alike acknowledge the 50th anniversary of the Detroit Rebellion of 1967, The Cutting Edge presents a conversation with Herb Boyd, author of the new book “Black Detroit” A People’s History of Self-Determination”- a rich account of African-American history in Motown. He was speaking with Rita Kiki Edozie. Professor of International Relations and African Affairs at Michigan State University while   at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in his hometown of Detroit They were both introduced by Charles Ferrell Vice President the Wright Museum.

“Policing the Black Man: Arrest, Prosecution, and Imprisonment”

From Dred-Scott Keyes | Part of the The Cutting Edge series | 01:00:03

The Cutting Edge presents Angela J. Davis talking about her book “Policing the Black Man: Arrest, Prosecution, and Imprisonment”, in which she explores the U.S. criminal justice system’s impact on African American boys and men.

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The Cutting Edge presents Angela J.  Davis of  the American University College of Law. talking about her book “Policing the Black Man: Arrest, Prosecution, and Imprisonment”, in which she explores the U.S. criminal justice system’s impact on African American boys and men. The book is a compilation of 12 essays by leading criminal justice scholars and legal experts on several areas of race and law, including racial profiling, implicit bias, the power of police and prosecutors, and mass incarceration. She was speaking at the Atlanta History Center.

"A Conversation with Raoul Peck"

From Dred-Scott Keyes | Part of the The Cutting Edge series | 01:00:44

The Cutting Edge presents a conversation on the making of the film "I Am Not Your Negro" with film maker Raoul Peck.

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The Cutting Edge presents a conversation on the making of the film "I Am Not Your Negro" with film maker Raoul Peck about his work, including “Lumumba”-a film about the life and times- and death- of Patrice Lumumba who became the first Prime Minister of the newly-independent Republic of the Congo, before being overthrown and murdered in 1960.  Kevin Young, the new Director of the Schomburg Center began the conversation and would later be joined by Paul Holdengräber, Director of LIVE from the NYP.

"Stokely: A Life"

From Dred-Scott Keyes | Part of the The Cutting Edge series | 01:00:35

Kwame Ture, once known as Stokely Carmichael was born in Trinadad, later moving to the United States at the age of eleven. He would become a leading activist in the 1960s Civil Rights and later, the Pan-African movements. A graduate of Howard University , Ture rose to prominence in those movements, first as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and later as the "Honorary Prime Minister" of the Black Panther Party, and finally as a leader of the All-African Peoples Revolutionary Party. Dr. Peniel Joseph has just completed Ture’s biography “Stokely: A Life” and was recently at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn to discuss his book at the invitation of the Medgar Evers College’s Center For Black Literature. The discussion was moderated by the Center’s Esmeralda Simmons.

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Kwame Ture, once known as Stokely Carmichael   was born in Trinadad, later moving to the United States at the age of eleven. He   would become a leading   activist in the 1960s Civil Rights and later, the Pan-African movements. A graduate of   Howard University , Ture rose to prominence in those movements,   first as a leader of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC),   and later as the "Honorary Prime Minister" of the Black Panther Party, and finally as a leader of the All-African Peoples Revolutionary Party. Dr. Peniel Joseph has just completed Ture’s biography “Stokely: A Life” and was recently at Medgar Evers College in Brooklyn to discuss his book at the invitation of the Medgar Evers College’s Center For Black Literature. The discussion was moderated by the Center’s Esmeralda Simmons.

"A Mayor's Life: Governing New York's Gorgeous Mosaic"

From Dred-Scott Keyes | Part of the The Cutting Edge series | 01:00:24

"A Mayor's Life: Governing New York's Gorgeous Mosaic" is the autobiography of New York City's 106th mayor, David Dinkins. The book recounts the life and career of Dinkins, who defeated Ed Koch and Rudy Giuliani to become the first and only Black mayor in New York City history.

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"A Mayor's Life: Governing New York's Gorgeous Mosaic" is the autobiography of New York City's 106th mayor, David Dinkins. The book recounts the life and career of Dinkins, who defeated Ed Koch and Rudy Giuliani to become the first and only Black mayor in New York City history. Set against the backdrop of the rise of Harlem's influence on city politics, which produced several state and national black leaders and energized the base that ultimately led to the election of President Barack Obama, A Mayor's Life deals with Dinkins' childhood in Trenton, NJ, his service in the U.S. Marine Corps, his education at Howard University and Brooklyn Law School, his political career beginning at the Carver Democratic Club and moving through jobs as City Clerk and Manhattan borough president to his election as mayor. Dinkins discusses his administration's successes, including an historic decrease in the city's crime rate; the cleanup of Times Square; the restoration of dilapidated housing in Northern Harlem, the South Bronx and Brooklyn; the deal to keep the US Open Tennis tournament in New York City and the hosting of Nelson Mandela on his first international visit after being freed from prison. Recently, Medgar Evers College hosted a book signing and conversation with Dinkins and Dr.Brenda Green, executive director of the college’s Center for Black Literature.

Audre Lorde: The Berlin Years-1984-1992

From Dred-Scott Keyes | Part of the The Cutting Edge series | 01:00:01

Producer Dred-Scott Keyes interviews film maker Dagmar Schultz about her film "Audre Lorde: The Berlin Years 1984-1992"

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Producer Dred-Scott Keyes interviews film maker Dagmar Schultz about her film "Audre Lorde: The Berlin Years 1984-1992"

Audre Lorde was a   Caribbean-American writer, poet and activist who dedicated both her life and her creative talent to address and fight the injustices of racism, sexism, and homophobia. She was born on February 18, 1934 in New York City of immigrant parents who settled in Harlem. While still in high school, she wrote her first poem, which was published in Seventeen Magazine. She attended  Hunter College   and graduated with a bachelor's degree in Arts. In 1954, Audre spent a critical year as a student at the National University of Mexico. During this period, she started to explore her sexuality and confirmed her identity as a lesbian and poet on both a personal and artistic level. After returning to New York, she continued her education at Columbia University and earned a master's degree in library science in 1961. In 1962, Audre Lorde married attorney Edwin Rollins and had two children, Elizabeth and Jonathan. The couple separated in 1970. She published her first volume of poems, “The First Cities” in 1968 and also became the writer-in-residence at Tougaloo College in Mississippi. It was here that she discovered her interest for teaching. The success of “First Cities” was quickly followed with “Cables to Rage” and “From a Land Where Other People Live”. During the 1960’s, Audre criticized feminist organizations, including the National Organization for Women and Betty Friedan's “The Feminine Mystique”, for their narrow approach of emphasizing only   the experiences and values of white middle-class women. Even though she showed that the differences between women are wide and varied, she said black women's experiences are different from those of white women, as the experience of the white woman is considered normative, whereas the black woman's experiences are marginalized.  In the same way the experiences of   lesbians, particularly the black ones are considered aberrational. Audre’s other poem collections included “Chosen Poems Old and New” and “Our Dead Behind Us” . Meanwhile, Audre who suffered from breast cancer, wrote “The Cancer Journals”   which won the Gay Caucus Book of the Year award in the year 1981. Her other prose works included “Zami: A New Spelling of My Name”, “Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches”, and “A Burst of Light” which won a National Book Award.In 1980, she co-founded, ‘Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press’, the first U.S. publisher for women of color.  She also founded ‘Sisters in Support of Sisters in South Africa’. It was an organization that was established to raise concerns about women under apartheid. In 1984, Audre accepted a visiting professorship at the Free University in Berlin, Germany which was documented in a full length film- Audre Lourde: The Berlin Years 1984-1992”. Those years not only had a great impact on her health but also had an impact on Black Germans-particularly the Afro-German women whom she encountered. I spoke with film maker Dagmar Schultz about the film and her influence on the movement of Black Germans.

Zora Neale Hurston

From Dred-Scott Keyes | Part of the The Cutting Edge series | 01:00:16

This Cutting Edge Special looks at the life of writer and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston.

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"Shout, Sister, Shout: The Sister Rosetta Tharpe Story

From Dred-Scott Keyes | Part of the The Cutting Edge series | 02:26:14

An interview/music mix with Gayle Wald, author of "Shout, Sister, Shout. The story of Rock and Roll trailblazer, Sister Rosetta Tharpe"

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Shout, Sister, Shout! tells the story of "Sister" Rosetta Tharpe, a vocalist and guitarist of the Sanctified church and one of the most remarkable-yet largely forgotten-musicians of the twentieth century. Beginning in the 1930s, she commenced a colorful career as gospel's original crossover artist, its first national superstar, and the most thrilling and celebrated guitarist of the music's Golden Age An iconoclastic and electrifying performer, Rosetta Tharpe influenced scores of musicians, from Little Richard and Ruth Brown to Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, and Isaac Hayes.

"Does Black Media Matter?'

From Dred-Scott Keyes | Part of the The Cutting Edge series | 01:00:01

A panel of distinguished Black journalists discuss the state of Black media and it's importance

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The 'Left Forum' held it’s annual event at John Jay College in New York City. A panel of distinguished Black journalists discuss the state of Black media and it's importance. Tonight The Cutting Edge brings you excerpts from a panel- hosted by myself and journalists Nyaba Arinde, editor of the Amsterdam News,  Devorah Hill, an editor and media consultant, writer/author Herb Boyd and Milron Allimadi, editor and publisher of Black Star News. The panel was entitled “Does Black Media Matter”. Milton Allimadi.

"Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America"

From Dred-Scott Keyes | Part of the The Cutting Edge series | 01:00:02

Discussion on the lingering history of racist ideology in the Americas and beyond.

Stamped-prx-promo_small While Americans like to insist that we’re living in a post-racial, color blind society, the truth of the matter is that racism is alive and well. The Cutting Edge presents Ibram X. Kendi , author of "Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America" and winner of the 2016 National Book Award   for non- fiction, and Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, author of "The Condemnation of Blackness", discussing the lingering  history of racist ideology in the Americas and beyond. ", discussing the lingering  history of racist ideology in the Americas and beyond.

"Rude, Crude and Crass: The Rise of the Right in America-Part Two

From Dred-Scott Keyes | Part of the "The Cutting Edge: Where Journalism, Culture, Politics and Activism Converge" series | 53:48

An audio collage of the development of the Klan, the Alt. Right and White Supremacy in the U.S.

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In the aftermath of the violent events in Charlottesvill Virginia, producer Dred- Scott Keyes presents an audio collage of the development of the Klan, the Alt. Right and White Supremacy in the U.S.

Who Controls Black Women's Bodies?

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

Reproductive health services for women are under attack, leaving poor women and women of color lacking access. But a broad coalition of women is striking back, changing the conversation on abortion and race.

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While overall access to contraception and other reproductive health services have increased over the last 20 years, access for low-income women and women of color has dropped.

Since the 2010 elections, anti-abortionists have grown more emboldened in their attempts to restrict not only abortion services, but also to basic reproductive care.  


African-American women have been especially targeted in a series of anti-abortion billboards posted across the country. Enraged by this finger-pointing, reproductive justice activist of all colors got together to fight for every woman’s right to health care. On this edition, the fight for access to reproductive health care.


WARNING: This program contains graphic language.


This program was funded in part by the Mary Wohlford Foundation.

Patrisse Khan-Cullors, “When They Call You A Terrorist”

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

Patrisse Khan-Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter reflections on humanity, the end of policing and her new book, WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST: A Black Lives Matter Memoir.

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Description:

Patrisse Khan-Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter and the author of the new book, WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST: A Black Lives Matter Memoir, a meaningful, empowering account of strength and resilience.

In this conversation, hosted by long-time organizer Cat Brooks, we hear Patrisse Cullors’ insights on Black Liberation, Police Terrorism and the criminalization of Black activism in America.

WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST takes an intimate look at Cullors’ time growing up in Van Nuys, California, surrounded by a devoted family and supportive friends, and weaves her experiences into the larger picture of how predominantly Black and Latino neighborhoods are under constant systemic attack. From an unrelenting and hostile police presence, to disproportionate punitive action, to lack of basic social and medical services, Cullors and bandele show how lack of personal security and dignity makes daily life an act of survival.

Featuring:  

Patrisse Khan-Cullors and Cat Brooks.