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Playlist: POSSIBLES

Compiled By: WVIA

 Credit:

A watch list of possible additions

The Song of Songs

From WQXR | 58:29

"I am sick with love." These five words say so much. Love is like a sickness and it affects the entire human race.

Playing
The Song of Songs
From
WQXR

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This line comes from the Hebrew Bible as part of a collection of poems known as "the Song of Songs." And they are words that still speak to us today. The Song of Songs confounds and tantalizes the faithful. It seduces composers, inspiring works by Monteverdi, Bach and contemporary composer Nico Muhly. In fact, there are dozens of musical settings, each dancing between earthly pleasures and heavenly aspirations.

Stage and screen star Jessica Hecht ("Fiddler on the Roof," "Breaking Bad," Dan in Real Life," "Sideways") hosts "The Bible’s Great Romance: The Song of Songs," a one-hour special of this sensuous verse married with choral music. 

Program playlist:

Marc Lavry: Song of Songs Oratorio, Op. 137, Overture
Kol Zion Lagola Choir (The Broadcasting Service Choir)
Kol Israel Symphony Orchestra (The Broadcasting Service Orchestra)
Marc Lavry, conductor
Courtesy of the Marc Lavry Heritage Society

Edward Bairstow: “I Sat Down”
Choir of All Saint’s Episcopal Church, Beverly Hills
Dale Adelmann, conductor
Gothic Records

Anonymous: “Laeva eius”
Stile Antico
Harmonia Mundi

Pablo Casals: “Nigra sum”
Choir of Jesus College Cambridge
Mark Williams, conductor
Signum Classics

Giovanni Palestrina: Missa de Beata Virgine
“Nigra sum”
Escolania de Montserrat; Capella de Música de Montserrat
Dom Ireneu Segarra, conductor
Koch

Healey Willan: “Rise up My Love”
The Choir of Trinity College Cambridge
Stephen Layton, conductor
Hyperion

Dietrich Buxtehude" “Ich suchte des Nachts in meinem Bette”
Gerd Türk, tenor; Stephan Schreckenberger Bass
Cantus Cölln
Konrad Junghänel, conductor
Harmonia Mundi

Dov Carmel/Yehezkel Braun: “Uri Tzafon”
Chicago a cappella
Patrick Sinozich, conductor
CAC

Howard Skempton: "How Fair is They Love”
Choir of Jesus College Cambridge
Mark Williams, conductor
Signum Classics

Johann Sebastian Bach: Cantata 140, BWV 140
“Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme”
Arnold Schonberg Choir; Conceptus Musicus Vien
Nikolaus Harnoncourt, conductor
Deutsche Harmonia Mundi

Hildegard of Bingen: “Favus distillans”
Sequentia
Benjamin Bagby, conductor
Deutsche Harmonia Mundi

William Billings: “I Am Come into My Garden”
The Western Wind
Western Wind Records

Marc Lavry: Song of Songs Oratorio, Op. 137
Aria: “I am black and comely”
Nurit Goren, Soprano
Kol Zion Lagola Choir (The Broadcasting Service Choir)
Kol Israel Symphony Orchestra (The Broadcasting Service Orchestra)
Marc Lavry, conductor
Courtesy of the Marc Lavry Heritage Society

Anonymous: “Iam hiems transiit”
Stile Antico
Harmonia Mundi

Edward Bairstow: “I Sat Down”
Choir of All Saint’s Episcopal Church, Beverly Hills
Dale Adelmann, conductor
Gothic Records

Martin de Rivaflecha: “Anima mea”
Choir of Jesus College Cambridge
Mark Williams, conductor
Signum Classics

Howard Skempton: “My Beloved Has Gone Down”
Choir of Jesus College Cambridge
Mark Williams, conductor
Signum Classics

Claudio Monteverdi: Vespro della Beata Vergine, SV 206
“Pulchra es”
Ann Monoyios, Marinella Pennicchi, sopranos
English Baroque Soloists
John Eliot Gardiner, conductor
Archiv

John Dunstable: “Quam pulchra es”
The Hilliard Ensemble
John Hillier, conductor
EMI

Orlando de Lassus: “Veni, dilecte mi”
Stile Antico
Harmonia Mundi 807489 

Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWF 18-05: Currentzis Debut, 10/29/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:57

Currentzis_05_small One of the hottest young stars in the world of classical music just took over at the Southwest German Radio Symphony Orchestra. Critics lauded their first concert together – and we've got it.

Shelf Discovery (Series)

Produced by Kristin Dreyer Kramer

Most recent piece in this series:

Shelf Discovery: Charmed by Jen Calonita

From Kristin Dreyer Kramer | Part of the Shelf Discovery series | 03:00

Charmed_small Each week on Shelf Discovery, host Kristin Dreyer Kamer offers listeners a brief look inside the pages of a new book. From mysteries to memoirs, classics to chick lit, busy readers are sure to find plenty of picks to add to their shelves. On this week's show, Kristin battles evil fairies with a reformed thief in author Jen Calonita's Charmed.

To read the full review, visit NightsAndWeekends.com.

Spoiler Alert Radio (Series)

Produced by MergingArts Productions

Most recent piece in this series:

Jeff Russo - Musician and Composer - Tonic, TV series Fargo and Power, and the films Hondros, Lizzie, Mile 22, and Pale Blue Dot

From MergingArts Productions | Part of the Spoiler Alert Radio series | 29:00

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After performing with the Grammy-nominated rock band Tonic for several years, Jeff has scored varied and compelling music for television, film and video games.

Some of Jeff's television projects include Necessary Roughness, The Returned for A&E, Power for Starz Network, and Star Trek: Discovery for CBS, Waco for Paramount and Fargo, for which he won an Emmy for composition.

Jeff's film work has included Lesson Plan, Hondros, Three Christs, Submission, and Mile 22.

His most recent film scoring projects include Lizzie, a reimagining of the Lizzie Borden story for director Craig MacNeill, and the drama Pale Blue Dot for director Noah Hawley.

Mozart Comes to America

From WGBH Radio Boston | 01:57:59

The violin and viola once owned by Mozart himself speak through the composer's music during the Boston Early Music Festival, thanks to the Salzburg Mozarteum.

Mozart_violin_in_case_396x281_small Mozart never made it to America: getting seasick crossing the English Channel put an end to any of his seafaring fantasies. But America was frequently on Mozart's mind. In fact, his closest collaborator, librettist Lorenzo Da Ponte, actually immigrated to these shores and became the first professor of Italian at Columbia University in New York.

Mozart's music has made it here, of course – it's woven into the lives of practically everyone. And that's a big part of why there were so many goosebumps when an excited audience in Boston was suddenly in the presence of two of the instruments that Mozart had placed firmly under his chin, in private and in concert, uncountable times.

Only a few days earlier, an Austrian had made his way through security with a violin case and boarded a plane in Salzburg. Another Austrian boarded a different plane with a viola case. And that marked the first time that two priceless possessions of Mozart had gone transatlantic. What a thrill that they were headed for the room up the hall from us at Classical New England. The Salzburg Mozarteum Foundation was reaching out to the wider world, and the two instruments were never, ever out of the sight of at least one member of the entourage who came along for events presented by the Boston Early Music Festival.