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Playlist: Marieke Meyer's Portfolio

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I am all day and night: The Music of Frank Zappa Part 1 of 3.

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the I Am All Day And Night: The Music Of Frank Zappa series | 53:57

Part One of a series about Frank Zappa.

Frank_zappa_small

Frank Zappa was an iconoclast, an incredible musician who embraced many kind of music, including rhythm and blues, do-wop, jazz, classical -- turning them into some of the most unusual compositions you could hope to hear, Zappa made music that definitely fell into the popular music arena, but was both very challenging and very listenable.

This series explores Zappa as a composer, and is told through the memories of some of those who knew him best -- family, his friends, and some of the musicians who worked with him. You'll hear from Zappa's wife, Gail Zappa, Ruth Underwood, the percussionist who first heard him at a famous concert at New Yorks Garrick theatre in 1967; Elliot Ingber, a guitarist in the early Mothers of Invention, and Joe Travers, drummer and vaultmeister of the Zappa archives.

 

I Am All Day and Night: The Music of Frank Zappa Part 2 of 3.

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the I Am All Day And Night: The Music Of Frank Zappa series | 53:56

Part Two of a series about Frank Zappa.

Frank_zappa_small

Frank Zappa was an iconoclast, an incredible musician who embraced many kind of music, including rhythm and blues, do-wop, jazz, classical -- turning them into some of the most unusual compositions you could hope to hear, Zappa made music that definitely fell into the popular music arena, but was both very challenging and very listenable.

This series explores Zappa as a composer, and is told through the memories of some of those who knew him best -- family, his friends, and some of the musicians who worked with him. You'll hear from Zappa's wife, Gail Zappa, Ruth Underwood, the percussionist who first heard him at a famous concert at New Yorks Garrick theatre in 1967; Elliot Ingber, a guitarist in the early Mothers of Invention, and Joe Travers, drummer and vaultmeister of the Zappa archives.

I Am All Day and Night: The Music of Frank Zappa Part 3 of 3.

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the I Am All Day And Night: The Music Of Frank Zappa series | 53:57

Part Three of a series about Frank Zappa.

Frank_zappa_small

Frank Zappa was an iconoclast, an incredible musician who embraced many kind of music, including rhythm and blues, do-wop, jazz, classical -- turning them into some of the most unusual compositions you could hope to hear, Zappa made music that definitely fell into the popular music arena, but was both very challenging and very listenable.

This series explores Zappa as a composer, and is told through the memories of some of those who knew him best -- family, his friends, and some of the musicians who worked with him. You'll hear from Zappa's wife, Gail Zappa, Ruth Underwood, the percussionist who first heard him at a famous concert at New Yorks Garrick theatre in 1967; Elliot Ingber, a guitarist in the early Mothers of Invention, and Joe Travers, drummer and vaultmeister of the Zappa archives.

News 2.0: The Future of News in the Age of Social Media- Part One

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the The Future of News in an Age of Social Media series | 52:14

Two one-hour CBC Radio programs about changes to our understanding of 'journalism' now that anyone can create, report and publish news.

Ireport-clarenceny-plane-crash_small

For more than a hundred years, the tools of journalistic production – the ability to report, photograph and record events and distribute that material to a mass audience – have resided in the hands of a small group of people who, by convention and by law, have been called journalists.

But in this 21st century the tools of production now belong to just about everyone. Thanks to "Web 2.0" technology – blogs, wikis, social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter and video sharing sites like YouTube – billions of people can transmit text, photos, and video instantly to a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. The tools of journalism are no longer the exclusive preserve of journalists.

Web 2.0 has made the creation of highly interactive online communities both easy and inexpensive. And these online communities have become important reference points in many people's lives, often replacing more traditional sources of influence, including journalists.

What is now called the "mainstream media" has lost its control over the tools of its trade, and its importance as a centre of social and political influence. The business and philosophical model both appear to be broken, perhaps irrevocably.

There is much to celebrate about this democratization of the media, but there are also reasons to be concerned about the loss of an independent, professional journalistic filter at a time when everyone can be their own media. Can online communities of "citizen journalists" be counted on to help us make informed choices as citizens and consumers? What's lost, and what's gained when "News 1.0" gives way to "News 2.0?"

News 2.0: The Future of News in the Age of Social Media- Part One

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the The Future of News in an Age of Social Media series | 52:14

Two one-hour CBC Radio programs about changes to our understanding of 'journalism' now that anyone can create, report and publish news.

Ireport-clarenceny-plane-crash_small

For more than a hundred years, the tools of journalistic production – the ability to report, photograph and record events and distribute that material to a mass audience – have resided in the hands of a small group of people who, by convention and by law, have been called journalists.

But in this 21st century the tools of production now belong to just about everyone. Thanks to "Web 2.0" technology – blogs, wikis, social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter and video sharing sites like YouTube – billions of people can transmit text, photos, and video instantly to a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. The tools of journalism are no longer the exclusive preserve of journalists.

Web 2.0 has made the creation of highly interactive online communities both easy and inexpensive. And these online communities have become important reference points in many people's lives, often replacing more traditional sources of influence, including journalists.

What is now called the "mainstream media" has lost its control over the tools of its trade, and its importance as a centre of social and political influence. The business and philosophical model both appear to be broken, perhaps irrevocably.

There is much to celebrate about this democratization of the media, but there are also reasons to be concerned about the loss of an independent, professional journalistic filter at a time when everyone can be their own media. Can online communities of "citizen journalists" be counted on to help us make informed choices as citizens and consumers? What's lost, and what's gained when "News 1.0" gives way to "News 2.0?"

News 2.0: The Future of News in an Age of Social Media- Part Two

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | Part of the The Future of News in an Age of Social Media series | 53:07

Two one-hour CBC Radio programs about changes to our understanding of 'journalism' now that anyone can create, report and publish news.

Ireport-clarenceny-plane-crash_small

For more than a hundred years, the tools of journalistic production – the ability to report, photograph and record events and distribute that material to a mass audience – have resided in the hands of a small group of people who, by convention and by law, have been called journalists.

But in this 21st century the tools of production now belong to just about everyone. Thanks to "Web 2.0" technology – blogs, wikis, social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter and video sharing sites like YouTube – billions of people can transmit text, photos, and video instantly to a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. The tools of journalism are no longer the exclusive preserve of journalists.

Web 2.0 has made the creation of highly interactive online communities both easy and inexpensive. And these online communities have become important reference points in many people's lives, often replacing more traditional sources of influence, including journalists.

What is now called the "mainstream media" has lost its control over the tools of its trade, and its importance as a centre of social and political influence. The business and philosophical model both appear to be broken, perhaps irrevocably.

There is much to celebrate about this democratization of the media, but there are also reasons to be concerned about the loss of an independent, professional journalistic filter at a time when everyone can be their own media. Can online communities of "citizen journalists" be counted on to help us make informed choices as citizens and consumers? What's lost, and what's gained when "News 1.0" gives way to "News 2.0?"

I Thank, Therefore I am, I Think

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | 29:47

It's almost heresy - on a day like this one - to question the idea of gratitude. But most of us - if we're honest - have an imperfect relationship with the concept and the practice.

Default-piece-image-0 It's Thanksgiving- a time of hospitality and good will- right? But not everyone feels the love- some people just get downright cranky. So, how about a reminder of the things that make you happy.  Frank Faulk presents a piece he calls "I Thank Therefore I Am, I Think."  It's about being grateful in spite of ourselves.

The Gift of Thanks

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | 54:35

Cultural anthropologist Margaret Visser about her book The Gift of Thanks.

The_gift_of_thanks_small Most of us say "thank you" dozens of times a day, but how often do we really mean it?   And why do we feel so hurt if we're not thanked?
In this week of giving thanks, we present Margaret Visser discussing her book The Gift of Thanks. Visser discusses how and why we're taught to say thanks, how different cultures express thanks, and she offers a brief history of
gratitude. 

Has thank you lost its meaning?

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | 55:00

We all say "thank you" a lot. We thank people for holding doors open for us. We thank the person who hands us our morning coffee. We thank the cashier when she hands us our change. And real keeners even send thank you notes to people who've given them a present. But if you were to
keep track of now many times a day you say "thank you," how often would you really mean it? So we ask the question: has thank you lost its meaning?

Promo-dnto-sm_small So, let me ask you, how many times have you said "thank you" today? Maybe 10 times or
more?  Has "thank you" become a hollow phrase in our lexicon that's overused and undervalued?  Today on the program, we present an award-winning episode of the CBC Radio program "Definitely Not the Opera" that considers if thank you has lost its meaning.