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With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Parenting in the Early Years (hour/no bb or bed)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 52:00

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Decisions about parenting–when to parent, whether to parent–have been in the news a lot lately. Mary Thompson says that stories about reproductive choices aren’t just newsworthy–they’ve also made their way increasingly into art. And: Janice Hawkins has been administering the covid vaccine to children. She shares why she believes it’s so important to get even the youngest vaccinated.

Later in the show: It’s estimated that there are 3,500 sleep-related infant deaths in the United States each year. The American Academy of Pediatrics has updated their sleep guidance to keep infants safer, with the help of UVA Health doctor Fern HauckPlus: Being a working parent is tough no matter the job. But academic parents face a particular set of challenges. Kerry Crawford and Leah Windsor are political scientists, mothers of young children, and authors of the new book The PhD Parenthood Trap: Caught Between Work and Family in Academia.

Skeptic Check: Pandemic Fear

From Big Picture Science | Part of the Big Picture Science series | 54:00

Contagion aside, coronavirus is a powerful little virus. It has prompted a global experiment in behavior modification: elbow bumps instead of handshakes, hand sanitizer and mask shortages, a gyrating stock market. Pragmatism mixes with fear and panic as we react. Can we identify when we’re acting sensibly in the face of COVID-19, or when fear has hijacked our ability to think rationally and protect ourselves?

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Contagion aside, coronavirus is a powerful little virus.  It has prompted a global experiment in behavior modification: elbow bumps instead of handshakes, hand sanitizer and mask shortages, a gyrating stock market.  

Pragmatism motivates our behavior toward the spread of this virus, but so do fear and panic. In 1918, amplified fear made the Spanish Flu pandemic more deadly. 

Can we identify when we’re acting sensibly in the face of COVID-19, or when fear has hijacked our ability to think rationally and protect ourselves?

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