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Playlist: 1 Hour Specials (Comm. Air, Misc.)

Compiled By: Emma Geddes

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A Change of World

From The Poetry Foundation | 59:00

Meryl Streep narrates an hour-long documentary special about how the Women’s Movement changed poetry, and how women poets changed the culture.

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"A Change of World" tells the story of how poets who were swept up in the Women’s Movement of the 1960s and 70s radically changed American poetry. As poet Alicia Ostriker says, "For the first time in the history of writing, which is about 4000 years or so, women could write without fear, without constantly looking over their shoulder to see if they were going to be approved of by men.” How did this come about?

Betty Friedan’s “The Feminine Mystique” was a primary catalyst of The Women’s Movement. In poetry, it was Sylvia Plath’s posthumous book “Ariel,” which electrified a generation of women poets. We’ll hear from Plath herself and from women poets who were coming up during the 1960s. We’ll also hear about the radical sexual and psychological candor of Plath’s friend, Anne Sexton.

By the 1970s women poets were publishing a huge variety of poetry that simply was not imaginable a decade earlier. Yet they still didn’t have mainstream literary approval. When Adrienne Rich won the National Book Award for Poetry in 1974, she accepted on behalf of her fellow nominees Audre Lorde and Alice Walker. This was a watershed moment. As Honor Moore says, :It was shocking. Feminism had no standing in the culture.  It was courageous in the sense that none of these three poets would ever be accepted or considered in the same way again.”

In the face of continuing sexism in the literary establishment, women poets began forming their own informal communities, with readings, magazines, bookstores, workshops and mentorships. We’ll hear about this movement from poets who participated, like Sharon Olds, Judy Grahn, Sonia Sanchez, Susan Griffin, as well as archival audio from some of the leading poets of the time. 

Border Radio: The Big Jukebox in the Sky

From Texas Folklife | 58:56

An hour-long music special on the story of Border Radio. Toe tapping music from hillbilly, western swing, Mexican conjunto and contemporary, rhythm and blues, and good ole rock and roll.

Borderradioimage_small Border Radio: The Great Big Jukebox in the Sky: (Stereo) An hour-long music special on the story of Border Radio. Lots of good toe tapping music from hillbilly, western swing, Mexican conjunto and contemporary, rhythm and blues, and good ole rock and roll. Between the 1930s through the 1960s, mega-watt "border blaster" stations set up just across the Mexican border to evade U.S. broadcast regulations, and beamed programming across the United States and as far away as Europe. For the first time, American listeners heard ?race music,? rhythm and blues, and a diverse span of music from ?hillbilly? to gospel that carried the voices and sounds of Mexico and the Southwest to a vast audience. The first in a series of taped-for-radio specials, Border Radio: The Big Juke Box in the Sky features Texas musicians, including Rick Trevi?o from Grammy-winning Los Super Seven; Austin?s own blues diva, Miss Lavelle White; rock and roller Joe King Carrasco; traditional conjunto from South Texas; and contemporary Tex-Mex rocker, Patricia Vonne. Border Radio?s most famous dee-jay, Wolfman Jack, makes a fictional dramatic appearance. Other special guests on Border Radio include Dallas ?Nevada Slim? Turner, one of border radio?s original cowboy singers and pitchmen, and a surprise appearance by Kinky Friedman, humorist and wildcard gubernatorial candidate for Texas in 2006. Border Radio: the Great Big Jukebox in the Sky is produced for radio by Ginger Miles, and executive-produced by Texas Folklife, made possible in part by a grant from National Endowment for the Arts.

Five Farms, Episode One: Planting

From The Center for Documentary Studies | Part of the Five Farms: Stories from American Farm Families series | 54:00

Spring planting on the family farm is the time of the annual gamble --- on the alchemies of nature, on the health of livestock, on future fall harvest market prices. Planting introduces five families who are among the 1 percent of Americans who live and work on farms: the Griffieons of Iowa; the Pecusas of Hopi, Arizona; the Mains of northern California; the Wises of North Carolina; and the Hagers of western Massachusetts.

Ff-img-craig-smaller_small Spring planting on the family farm is the time of the annual gamble --- on the alchemies of nature, on the health of livestock, on future fall harvest market prices. Planting introduces five families who are among the 1 percent of Americans who live and work on farms: the Griffieons of Iowa; the Pecusas of Hopi, Arizona; the Mains of northern California; the Wises of North Carolina; and the Hagers of western Massachusetts.

YBYG177: You Bet Your Garden # 77 Spiderman-GOOD Spider Mites-BAD, 3/18/2020

From You Bet Your Garden | Part of the You Bet Your Garden series | 54:58

On the Question of the week Mike McGrath takes on the infamous pest, "Spider Mites" . And takes on your fabulous phone calls!

Ybyg-sp-p_small On the Question of the week Mike McGrath takes on the infamous pest, "Spider Mites" . And takes on your fabulous phone calls!

Mystery Monday

From William Taylor | Part of the Mystrey Monday series | 56:58

Mystery Monday is a series of one hour program that features vintage radio mystery programs from the 1930's through the 1950's.

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Mystery Monday is a one hour program that features two different vintage radio mystery programs on each release. The majority of the vintage programs come from the mid 1930s through the War Years.  Some of our programs do feature mysteries from the late 40's and early 50's.
Due to the type of progamming in the 30's and 40's Mystery Monday runs between 55 and 60 minutes.

The Neuro-Adventures of Oliver Sacks

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 58:59

A conversation about the author and neurologist Oliver Sacks, with his friend Lawrence Weschler.

Screen_shot_2020-09-02_at_9 Oliver Sacks was the beloved doctor of strong souls in afflicted bodies. He was a neurologist with an eye for the invisible, the medical detective who found himself addicted to his patients in the back wards and to writing about them. Most famous of all was The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, a classic Sacks title. And now, four year after his death, we have a Sacks saga just as compelling, in what amounts to clinical notes on the man himself. It is Lawrence Weschler’s record of a 30-year friendship that was supposed to produce a giant New Yorker profile but didn’t—a story within the story. Instead we have a portrait of a singular soul’s attachment to science, and music, and being human.

For more than 30 years, Lawrence Weschler of the New Yorker magazine had been filing conversational sketches of his friend Sacks—toward a giant profile. The project ground to a halt when Sacks insisted that his homosexuality was off limits. But after Sacks had told all his own secrets, the doctor insisted that Weschler finally publish his version. Lawrence (known as Ren) Weschler’s title is And How Are You, Dr. Sacks? At the foundation of the book and our conversation is Weschler’s eye on Oliver Sacks in his medical rounds, year after year, back to the early eighties when his first literary masterpiece emerged. 

Driving While Black

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | 54:00

One evening in 2015, Montrealer Kenrick McRae was pulled over by police. The officer told him his licence plate lights weren’t bright enough. So after having the dealership verify his lights were in fact working fine, Kenrick got another light and mounted it himself to make sure he would never be given the same reason again. But he still was. In fact, no matter how scrupulous he is, Kenrick, who is Black, says he has been stopped by Montreal police multiple times. After Kenrick's girlfriend filmed him being handcuffed and detained during a traffic stop one night in 2017, he lodged a formal complaint with Quebec's police ethics committee, determined to prove that what's happening to him is because of the colour of his skin. This is the story of one person's ongoing experience of racial profiling by police, and how it has undermined every facet of his life.

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Whenever Kenrick McRae uses his car, he does a thorough spot check first. Before he gets in, he walks around the car, even testing the brake lights by putting a brick on the pedal to verify that the lights are on.

"I always want to be on the right side of the law," he told CBC's The Doc Project radio program.

But no matter how scrupulous he is, McRae, who is Black, can't seem to avoid being stopped by Montreal police. He's been pulled over dozens of times, he says, some months, as many as 15.

"They might say some kind of light is not working, [or] they thought I didn't have my seatbelt on, but when they come up, they see the seatbelt is on," he said.

Montreal police declined The Doc Project's request for comment on McRae's experiences. A representative wrote that the force does not discuss specific cases, particularly those that have been brought before Quebec's police ethics commissioner, as McRae's complaints have. 

McRae, 48, has filed five racial profiling complaints against Montreal police with the help of the Centre for Research-Action on Race Relations (CRARR), a Montreal-based civil rights advocacy group.

Two were settled through conciliation; one was dismissed by the police ethics commissioner; and in a fourth case, the province's police ethics committee ruled in McRae's favour and ordered the suspension of the officers involved. The Quebec Human Rights and Youth Rights Commission recommended that the city and officers pay damages to McRae, but the deadline for that passed, and the case is now likely to go before the provincial Human Rights Tribunal.

One complaint, over a ticket for being a driver under the influence of alcohol that McRae received in August 2019 while clearing out empty containers from his car, is still in progress.

2019 report examined racial profiling by Montreal police

McRae's experience is far from unique, says Alain Babineau, a retired RCMP officer who spent more than three decades in policing and helped McRae file one of his complaints. 

Babineau said he has encountered others who say they've been stopped as frequently as McRae. 

"Those are the folks that come forward. Not everybody that gets racially profiled comes forward," said Babineau, a McGill University law graduate who now works as a civil rights advocate. 

Civil rights advocates in Montreal have been trying to shine a light on cases of alleged racial profiling by police for over a decade.

In 2019, a report commissioned by the City of Montreal that looked into street checks, found Indigenous people and Black people were four to five times more likely than white people to be stopped by police.

"It's horrific because they've accepted this as being their plight in life, and at some point, you have to develop some type of anger and animus towards law enforcement," said Babineau.

Following the release of the 2019 report, Montreal Police Chief Sylvain Caron said he was "very surprised" by the findings but vowed to take quick, concrete and transparent action to reduce racial disparities.

In July 2020, after a series of consultations, the police service introduced a policy on street checks with guidelines outlining when and how officers could stop people. 

Ticketed while taking out recycling

McRae, who was a police officer in his native Guyana, moved to Montreal in 2006.

He'd initially hoped to continue his career in policing, but he doesn't speak French, which ruled out that possibility. 

Eventually, he found a job as a brake rider at Montreal's Trudeau International Airport, towing planes around the tarmac before and after takeoff. 

It was a well-paying job, McRae said, enabling him to buy a used 2002 Mercedes SUV. 

But soon, he said, he found himself being regularly pulled over while driving to work. 

In one instance last August, McRae was stopped by a police officer while throwing out some cups and cans from his car with his recycling just outside his apartment building.

He was issued a $486 ticket for "being the driver of a road vehicle, having consumed alcoholic beverages" after an officer pulled an empty beer bottle from his recycling. McRae said he was neither drinking nor driving his car at the time.

He said he initially refused to show the officer his ID but gave it to her after three more police cruisers arrived on scene. 

"So, I count to 10, and I said, 'You know, today is not my day to die,'" he recounted.

McRae said this and other experiences with Montreal police have given him a clear impression. 

"I'm not worth it, you know, living in this society."

He said he'd move away from Montreal but that he can't leave the city because he co-parents a teenage daughter.  

'We don't have systemic racism'

Filing individual complaints against police as McRae has done has hardly made a dent in the wider problem of racial profiling, says Babineau. He says there seems to be an unwillingness on the part of politicians and police administrators to tackle systemic racism.

"We don't have systemic racism," RCMP Commissioner Brenda Lucki told the Globe and Mail in June when asked whether the problem exists on the force in the wake of widespread protests over racism in policing following the death of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis.

She told several media outlets that she was struggling to precisely define the term.

Curtis Zablocki, the RCMP's commanding officer in Alberta, shared his boss's view. 

"I do see us different than the United States," he said at the time. "I don't believe that racism is systemic through Canadian policing. I don't believe it's systemic through policing in Alberta."  

Their comments sparked an outcry. Lucki and Zablocki quickly walked them back, acknowledging they had more to learn on the subject. 

Babineau said it's frustrating that police leaders are still trying to catch up to the problem when people of colour in Canada have been highlighting it for decades.

"It's a very simple question with very complex answers," said Massimiliano Mulone, an associate professor of criminology at the University of Montreal.

Mulone was one of the co-authors of the 2019 Montreal street check report and is currently studying the impact of the police's new street check policy. In cities across the country, he said, the data suggests that Black and Indigenous people are stopped at higher rates than white people.

The reasons why aren't just the fault of police, he said; the disparity reflects bias and prejudice that exist more widely. 

Mulone saw similar levels of racial discrimination when street checks were prompted by a call from a citizen, for example.

"You cannot put all the fault on the police, but at the same time, you cannot say the police doesn't have any responsibility in this systemic discrimination," he said. "It's not just a police problem; it's a society problem."

The nature of police work, in turn, makes existing biases even stronger, Mulone said.

"Police officers work a lot on the premise of suspicion ... [In] their experience, they think that race is an important determinant of suspicion."  

Babineau said he witnessed and participated in systemic racism during his 28 years in the RCMP, mostly stationed in Ontario. 

"Even if you're a racialized police officer, you become part of the culture in which you operate," he said. 

"I was part of the drug squad for 10 years. So, we're targeting so-called high crime areas. And you end up targeting a particular community and developing these particular stereotypes in your mind as to who's involved in [criminal activity]."

Babineau said that sometimes led to communities being over-policed by officers who were intent on making arrests.

To date, there's been some progress in certain Canadian jurisdictions, but overall, improvements have been limited, Babineau said.

For example, the new street check policy introduced in Montreal last summer prohibits "any police checks that are unfounded, random or based on a discriminatory criterion." But, in Babineau's view, it will do little to curb racial profiling because it doesn't lay out sanctions for officers who break the rules.

He suspects the policy was an effort to make it look like the city was taking action in a summer of protests over police brutality.

The Doc Project reached out the Montreal police service about the street check policy, but they declined to comment.

Furthermore, Babineau said, traffic stops such as those McRae encountered aren't included in the policy, which focuses on pedestrian stops.

Mulone said he would like to see racial discrimination become a criteria when it comes to evaluating the effectiveness of police programs. He also wants to see police services shift their primary purpose from fighting crime to creating a sense of security in the communities they serve. 

"The main mission [should be] to contribute to the security of the people, and the security of the people is due to the fact that you're not targeted in a way that is discriminatory. "

A toll on mental health

CRARR's executive director, Fo Niemi, is hopeful McRae's most recent complaint, filed with Quebec's police ethics commissioner, will be successful.

Niemi has helped McRae file this and other complaints against Montreal police and says while cases can drag on for years, "McRae is someone who will not back down."

McRae said he's prepared to fight but that his experience with Montreal police has deeply affected his psyche. 

"I'm scared every day, especially when I go outside."

Babineau said the recurring nature of McRae's negative experiences are likely taking a toll on his mental health. 

"You can argue that he's suffering from some form of PTSD, right? Because this happened to him repeatedly," Babineau said. "And that's very serious in my opinion — and here's a guy who was a cop." 

WHER: 1000 Beautiful Watts

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the Lost & Found Sound series | 58:40

The story of the first all-girl radio station in the nation

Wher1_small WHER, the first all-girl radio station in the nation, went on the air in Memphis on October 29, 1955. It was the brainchild of sound legend Sam Phillips, who created the groundbreaking format with money he raised from selling Elvis Presley's Sun Studios contract.
 
Women almost exclusively ran WHER. On the air they read the news, interviewed local celebrities, and spun popular records. Behind the scenes they sold and created commercials, produced and directed programming and sat at the station's control boards. 

Rocket Girls and Astro-nettes

From Richard Paul | 59:07

Women in the ultimate Man’s World – the labs and Shuttle crew cabins of NASA in the 60s and 70s.

Eileen_collins_nasa_photo_2_of_2_small This program is the story of women in the ultimate Man’s World – the labs and Shuttle crew cabins of NASA.  Told in the first person, these stories explore the experiences of NASA’s first woman engineers and scientists and its first astronauts.  It also tells the fascinating story of a group of women pilots who – in the early 1960s – were led to believe that they would be America’s first women astronauts and were given the exact same physical tests are the Mercury astronauts.  The program is narrated by Eileen Collins, the first woman commander of a Space Shuttle. 

Hidden Frequencies

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | 54:00

Hidden Frequencies, explores the sounds around us, from the unheard or unnoticed to the absent or loud -- and delves into how they affect ourselves, our surroundings, and the natural world. The program digs into the science behind the sounds we hear on land, in the air, and in the water to show how even the simplest sounds in all of these environments have a whole story behind them.

Hidden_frequencies_small Hidden Frequencies, explores the sounds around us, from the unheard or unnoticed to the absent or loud -- and delves into how they affect ourselves, our surroundings, and the natural world. The program digs into the science behind the sounds we hear on land, in the air, and in the water to show how even the simplest sounds in all of these environments have a whole story behind them.

The Bod Pod

From Canadian Broadcasting Corporation | 54:00

Ify Chiwetelu and Jane Testar spend an hour exploring what it takes to love, or even just like, your body. How do you love the body you’re in in the face of diet culture and challenges to body positivity? This special will make you think about your relationship with your body, challenge ingrained thought processes, and question your behaviours. The Bod Pod is not passive listening, it’s a call to action...

The_bod_pod_small Ify Chiwetelu and Jane Testar spend an hour exploring what it takes to love, or even just like, your body. How do you love the body you’re in in the face of diet culture and challenges to body positivity? This special will make you think about your relationship with your body, challenge ingrained thought processes, and question your behaviours. The Bod Pod is not passive listening, it’s a call to action...

Raising Awareness Special

From Radio K | Part of the Real College Podcast series | 58:22

In this episode of Real College Podcast we take a trip inside Minneapolis public schools to see how the pandemic has affected education inequalities, have conversations with domestic violence professionals, take a look at how eating disorders affect our society, a dive into diabetes and the food culture of the midwest, increasing musical diversity here at the U, and an extra special installment of Radio K sports!

Additional Links:
Violence Free MN-https://www.vfmn.org
What To Say-https://www.whattosaynow.org
Pretty Simple Boutique-https://prettysimpleme.com
Library Loan Catalougue-https://mnlink.org/

1:31-Public Schools-Isaac Maruyama
7:33-Domestic Violence-Emma Morris & Casey McCabe
30:38-Eating Disorders-Shannon Brault
37:21-Diabetes-Kasey Salazar
44:07-Music Diversity-Ethan Olson
52:51-Radio K Sports-Jason Rutman

Awareness_small In this episode of Real College Podcast we take a trip inside Minneapolis public schools to see how the pandemic has affected education inequalities, have conversations with domestic violence professionals, take a look at how eating disorders affect our society, a dive into diabetes and the food culture of the midwest, increasing musical diversity here at the U, and an extra special installment of Radio K sports! Additional Links: Violence Free MN-https://www.vfmn.org What To Say-https://www.whattosaynow.org Pretty Simple Boutique-https://prettysimpleme.com Library Loan Catalougue-https://mnlink.org/ 1:31-Public Schools-Isaac Maruyama 7:33-Domestic Violence-Emma Morris & Casey McCabe 30:38-Eating Disorders-Shannon Brault 37:21-Diabetes-Kasey Salazar 44:07-Music Diversity-Ethan Olson 52:51-Radio K Sports-Jason Rutman

Bridging the Shores: The Hmong-American Experience

From Wisconsin Public Radio | 59:00

Sound-rich documentary about Hmong-Americans living in the U.S.

Bridgshores01_small * Winner of the RTNDA-UNITY Award for excellence in diversity coverage, 2009
* Winner of the Wisconsin AP Awards for Best Documentary, 2009
* Winner of the Asian-American Journalists Association for excellence in coverage of Asian-American/Pacific Islander issues (radio), 2009
Winner of the University of Wisconsin Extension/UW Colleges Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Collaboration (Wisconsin Public Radio and the Wisconsin Institute for Public Policy and Service)
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More than 30 years since fleeing their native Laos after the Vietnam War, many Hmong still struggle with issues of cultural preservation and identity as they forge new lives in America. Bridging the Shores is a one-hour documentary that explores the challenges - and triumphs - of the Hmong-American community as they strive to assimilate into mainstream society yet preserve their traditions. Sources have been drawn from three states with the largest Hmong populations (Wisconsin, Minnesota, and California) but this program can appeal to any audience with a strong interest in Southeast Asian culture or immigrant communities. Topics covered include the generation gap, modern weddings, Hmong's efforts to incorporate their history into American classrooms, efforts to repatriate disturbed refugee remains in Thailand, spirituality, the career of Minnesota Senator Mee Moua, treating elders with PTSD, and new music forms incorporating traditional Hmong and American hip-hop.

Cultivating Place: LUNAR NEW YEAR, a conversation with Taiwanese American plantsman Eric Hsu

From North State Public Radio | Part of the Cultivating Place series | 59:00

On February 12th, the Lunar New Year begins. Celebrated by Asian cultures across the globe, this week Cultivating Place speaks with Eric Hsu, a plantsman of Taiwanese descent particularly interested in following the threads of history back to the many Asian and Asian immigrant contributions to western horticulture in the US. Listen in!

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On February 12th, the Lunar New Year begins. Celebrated by Asian cultures across the globe, this week Cultivating Place speaks with Eric Hsu, a plantsman of Taiwanese descent particularly interested in following the threads of history back to the many Asian and Asian immigrant contributions to western horticulture in the US. Listen in!


The Book As Art: Barry McCallion, The Oarsman & Matthew Rose, A Book About Death

From Francesca Rheannon | Part of the Writer's Voice series | 57:52

We talk with book artist Barry McCallion about book art including his series The Oarsman, which he’s been creating now for fifty years. Then, we replay excerpts from my 2009 interview with Matthew Rose about A Book About Death, the exhibition he curated of art postcards mailed in from around the world.

Mccallion_small We’re all used to narrative that’s told with words. But what about narrative that’s told through art? Book art?

We talk with book artist Barry McCallion about book art including his series The Oarsman, which he’s been creating now for fifty years. Then, we replay excerpts from my 2009 interview with Matthew Rose about A Book About Death, the exhibition he curated of art postcards mailed in from around the world.

Barry McCallion
Host Francesca Rheannon: I met the artist Barry McCallion in a local writing group that both of us attended for a time. He’s a wonderful writer, but what I didn’t know until I visited him in his home in East Hampton NY is that he’s also a wonderful artist. A book artist. The bookshelves in his study are filled with what one journalist called “astonishingly beautiful and utterly unique books, an artistic treasure trove.” Indeed they are. They combine painting, objects, sculpture and, most of all, imagination to build a narrative that is more evocative than literary.

Much of McCallion’s work is centered on his Oarsman series, books that tell a story through painting, collage and objects that compose a kind of journey. The series was inspired by a vision. McCallion writes: “In 1970, a man in a rowboat, hovering in the air, appeared suddenly in the middle of my living room.  For some time I had been searching for a subject - a theme - that would enable me to combine art with narrative. The Oarsman's appearance solved the problem.”

Matthew Rose
When we spoke with Barry McCallion (featured in the first segment of today’s show) he spoke about his origins as an artist in the Fluxus Movement, including mail art, where artists mailed pieces of their art to each other in a collaborative process.

Back in 2009, WV’s Francesca Rheannon interviewed Matthew Rose about an exhibition he mounted in a Fluxus art gallery in Soho in Manhattan. The exhibition was of an unbound book of art postcards he curated, A Book About Death, which was created out of the mailed postcards of artists from around the world.

Coming Home: the Return of the Alutiiq Masks

From Native Voice One | 53:56

A one-hour radio documentary about the cultural resurgance taking place in Kodiak, Alaska.

199unartulik3_small A dramatic story of a culture saving its lost art and history comes to life with in the special edition of Koahnic Broadcast Corporation's national program, Earthsongs. This one-hour radio documentary project, set to release in November 2008, stems from a partnership with United States Artist (USA) Rockefeller Fellow and George Peabody Award-Winning Artist, Dmae Roberts and Koahnic's Earthsongs Host and Producer, Shyanne Beatty. The documentary details the long-sought return of the Alutiiq Masks from France to Kodiak. In the winter of 1872, a French anthropologist, Alphonse Pinart, traveled the Kodiak archipelago, assembling one of the world?s most extensive collections of Alutiiq ceremonial masks, and brought them back to France. In May, 2008, 34 of these Alutiiq ceremonial masks were returned to their people and exhibited at The Alutiiq Museum in Kodiak, Alaska. The documentary features artists who helped make the return possible and unveils secrets of the masks that unlocked song, stories and forgotten language once thought lost. The complex, sound-rich production features triptych storytelling, compelling interviews and music from Kodiak Island where Alutiiq/Sugpiaq peoples are undergoing a cultural renaissance. Dmae Roberts (www.dmaeroberts.com) is a two-time Peabody award-winning radio producer living in Portland, OR. She won the USA fellowship and the Asian American Journalists Association's award for civil rights and social justice. She won her second Peabody for her eight-hour Asian American history series, Crossing East. Shyanne Beatty is Hangwichin Athabascan who grew up in a subsistence lifestyle in Eagle, Alaska where the Yukon River meets the Alaska/Canadian border. She began her career in 1999 as a Production Assistant fellow for Koahnic Broadcast Corporation. She is now Koahnic?s traveling media instructor and weekly host of Earthsongs. Koahnic Broadcast Corporation (www.knba.org), the country's leading Native media enterprise, operates four divisions: KNBA 90.3 FM, the country's only urban, Native public radio station; national radio programming including National Native News, Earthsongs and Native America Calling; and Native Voice One (NV1), the Native American radio service.

Culture in the classrooms

From Native Voice One | Part of the Native America Calling American Graduate series | 59:01

One school on the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota puts a focus on culturally based education and it might be getting results. From sugar bushing to round dance competitions, cultural practices are part of the educational process.

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One school on the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota puts a focus on culturally based education and it might be getting results. From sugar bushing to round dance competitions, cultural practices are part of the educational process. Overall, only 56 percent of American Indian students graduated on time in Minnesota in 2015, according to the Minnesota Department of Education. The average is 84 percent. In this continuation of our collaboration with the American Graduate initiative, we’ll talk with educators from the White Earth Reservation about their approach and what they’re seeing.

Reconnecting with a Healthy Lifestyle

From Native Voice One | 58:31

Reconnecting with a Healthy Lifestyle is a special broadcast from National Native News with a focus on traditional foods to improve the health and wellness of Native people. We hear from tribal leaders, health advocates and grassroots coalition members who are taking on wellness initiatives, promoting food sovereignty programs to increase access to fresh produce, and are seeking new ways to improve the overall health of their communities.

Re-connecting_with_a_healthy_lifsetyle2_small Reconnecting with a Healthy Lifestyle is a special broadcast from National Native News, with a focus on traditional foods to improve the health and wellness of Native people. From urban gardens and tribal seed banks, to Indigenous smartphone apps to sharing traditional recipes, Native people are reconnecting to their traditions and culture to address disease and encourage others to live a holistic way of life .

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Native Americans and Alaska Natives are more likely to report their health is  fair or poor  compared to other groups, particularly Caucasians.  Rates of diabetes, suicide and chronic illnesses are often higher in Native communities. Indigenous people across the United States are taking control of their mental and physical health using both traditional methods and Western medicine.

In the special program Reconnecting with a Healthy Lifestyle, we hear from tribal leaders, health advocates and grassroots coalition members who are taking on wellness initiatives, promoting food sovereignty programs to increase access to fresh produce, and are seeking new ways to improve the overall health of their communities.

A cultural curriculum in Oregon

From Native Voice One | Part of the Native America Calling American Graduate series | 59:00

In Oregon, the graduation rates for Native students remain well below all other groups. A new report from the state’s Department of Education shows graduation is up by six percent overall from four years ago. Still Native students are at the bottom. But there is some hope in Warm Springs centered around a curriculum that includes Native history and culture.

Native_pride_graduation_california_indian_legal_services_video_small In Oregon, the graduation rates for Native students remain well below all other groups. A new report from the state’s Department of Education shows graduation is up by six percent overall from four years ago. But Native students are at the bottom. But there is some hope in Warm Springs centered around a curriculum that includes Native history and culture. The creators of the curriculum have confidence that students exposed to their culture are more likely to stay in school and achieve future success.  

Guests: Jaylyn Suppah (Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs) – member of the Warm Springs Education Committee; Carina Miller (Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs) – agency district Tribal Council representative for the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs; Hunter Onstad (Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs) – co-chair of the Warm Springs Youth Council

 

Our Voices Will Be Heard

From Native Voice One | 59:00

A mother seeks to break the cycle of family violence –
A tribe deals with the pain in silence –
A daughter finds strength by sharing her word -
Healing will begin when – Our Voices Will Be Heard

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Our Voices Will Be Heard is a 59-min radio theater adaptation of a play about a powerful mother- daughter journey that reveals how generations face the choice of continuing to perpetuate—or disrupt—family violence. Through the lens of fiction, and the palette of Alaska Native Storytelling, the playwright tells the true story of her mother’s strength against impossible pressure. Our Voices Will Be Heard weaves together legend and truth in a fierce call for healing and forgiveness.

As I Am: Asians In America

From Nathan Kupel | 57:00

The As I Am pilot features reports, analyses, and commentary on social, political, cultural and artistic topics seldom heard on traditional public radio broadcasts. Hosted by the award-winning journalist, author and scholar Helen Zia, public radio audiences will hear unique voices and perspectives on a variety of issues from across the country.

Helenzia_small About the Pilot The As I Am pilot features reports, analyses, and commentary on social, political, cultural and artistic topics seldom heard on traditional public radio broadcasts. Hosted by the award-winning journalist, author and scholar Helen Zia, public radio audiences will hear unique voices and perspectives on a variety of issues from across the country. The As I Am Pilot has also just recently received an award from the American Women in Radio and Television in the "Outstanding Special Category," for a segment that was previously aired on American Public Media's Weekend America. The Pilot features up and coming author Min Jin Lee as she discusses her new book Free Food for Millionaires with Boston College's Professor Min Hyoung Song. As I Am's Paul Niwa reveals the effects of gentrification on Boston's Chinatown through one man's battle against his landlord's rent increase. American Public Media's Angela Kim's journey from California to the Midwest reminds us that no matter where we may move we are often searching for something, anything, to remind us of where we came from. Nationally recognized slam poet Regie Cabico performs a piece that challenges the notion that we can be easily defined by a census box. Known for his cookbooks and popular television show Yan Can Cook, Chef Martin Yan steps out of the kitchen to talk with the award-winning broadcast journalist Sydnie Kohara. A group of UMass Boston students' trip to the Gulf Coast is chronicled as they discuss rebuilding the Vietnamese American communities ravaged by Hurricane Katrina. And International Studies Professor at Trinity College Vijay Prashad comments on why his ideal home isn't in the present, it is in the future. You can hear these stories and more, on As I Am: Asians In America. Musical consideration for the pilot has been provided by Boston Progress Radio a community-based online radio station and blog focusing on independent Asian American music and art. For more information on Boston Progress Radio please visit their website: www.bprlive.org. Bio for Helen Zia Helen Zia is an award-winning journalist and a Contributing Editor to Ms. Magazine, where she was formerly Executive Editor. She is the author of Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People (2000), which President Bill Clinton quoted at White House ceremonies and was a finalist for the prestigious Kiriyama Prize. She is coauthor, with Wen Ho Lee, of My Country Versus Me (2002). Their book reveals what happened to the Los Alamos scientist who was falsely accused in unsubstantiated front page stories of being a spy for China in the worst case since the Rosenbergs. Her articles, essays and reviews have appeared in numerous publications, including Ms., New York Times, Washington Post, The Nation, Essence, The Advocate, Curve, and OUT. Ms. Zia testified before the US Commission on Civil Rights 1997 about inaccurate and biased news coverage of Asian Americans during the spotlight on campaign finance. She traveled to Beijing in 1995 to cover the UN Fourth World Congress on Women as part of a journalists of color delegation. Her work on the Asian American landmark civil rights case of anti-Asian violence is documented in the Academy Award nominated film, "Who Killed Vincent Chin?" A second generation Chinese American, Helen Zia received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from the Law School of the City University of New York and was the first recipient of the Suzanne Ahn Journalism Award for Civil Rights and Social Justice. She is an Expert Fellow with University of Southern California's Justice and Journalism program of the Annenberg School of Journalism, and is a Writer-in-Residence at New York University's APA Institute. She is a graduate of Princeton University and a member of the university's first graduating class of women. She quit medical school after completing two years, then went to work as a construction laborer, an autoworker, and a community organizer, after which she discovered her life's work as a writer.

Climate Courage

From Safe Space Radio | 59:00

Reports of wildfires, hurricanes, and extinctions are frightening, yet we rarely hear people talking about the mental health impact of these changes. This hour-long show explores how addressing the mental health impacts of climate change can make us more effective at combating it. Safe Space Radio combines compelling storytelling with practical expert guidance to give listeners the tools they need to start their own courageous conversations.

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Reports of wildfires, hurricanes, and extinctions are frightening, yet we rarely hear people talking about the mental health impact of these changes. This hour-long show explores how addressing the mental health impacts of climate change can make us more effective at combating it. We hear stories about the challenge of facing the facts, and bearing the grief, hopelessness, and fear that may come up. We listen to young people voice their doubts about having children given the uncertainty of the future. Finally, we consider how taking action can lead us to greater strength and connection. Safe Space Radio combines compelling storytelling with practical expert guidance to give you the tools you need to start finding your own courage.


  • A third grader tackles his fear of climate change

  • A professor offers climate anxiety counseling on the street 

  • An activist goes to the U.N. climate talks—while a flood ravages her hometown in India

Saying Goodbye

From Safe Space Radio | 59:00

How do we prepare to say goodbye at the end of someone's life, and how does that goodbye impact our mental health as we grieve? This hour-long show is about the challenges and benefits of saying a good goodbye. Safe Space Radio combines compelling storytelling with practical expert guidance to give you the tools you need to start your own difficult conversations.

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How do we prepare to say goodbye at the end of someone's life, and how does that goodbye impact our mental health as we grieve? This hour-long show is about the challenges and benefits of saying a good goodbye. Through stories, we explore different facets of goodbyes, including why so many of us avoid saying goodbye even in the most life-changing moments. We also discuss how initiating a goodbye conversation can make us more emotionally resilient long-term. We combine compelling storytelling with practical expert guidance to give you the tools you need to start your own difficult conversations.


  • A hospice nurse shares lessons he’s learned in his work 

  • A mom of three faces her own death with clarity and courage 

  • A poet reflects on saying goodbye after the death of her son 

  • An expert in childhood loss discusses how families can say their goodbyes 

Profiles in Mental Health and Courage

From Safe Space Radio | 59:00

Courage is the choice to act even when we feel afraid. It gives us the ability to address shame, stigma and silence—and to feel our own strength. This hour-long show is about how accessing our courage supports our mental health and well-being. Safe Space Radio combines compelling storytelling with practical expert guidance to give you the tools you need to find your own courage.

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Courage is the choice to act even when we feel afraid. It gives us the ability to address shame, stigma and silence—and to feel our own strength. This hour-long show is about how accessing our courage supports our mental health and well-being. We explore the experience of living with mental illness—such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and borderline personality disorder—as a kind of “courage boot camp.” We also discuss how culturally-imposed silence can enforce shame and make accessing our courage much more difficult. Safe Space Radio combines compelling storytelling with practical expert guidance to give you the tools you need to find your own courage.


  • A single mom’s psychotic episode leads her to start a million-dollar business 

  • A retired firefighter confronts mental health stigma in the fire service 

  • A law student pursues her dreams despite a diagnosis of schizophrenia.