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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

440: Inside the Minds of Thrill Seekers, 5/20/2022

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 59:01

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small Skydiving, BASE jumping, climbing the highest peaks, adventuring to remote parts of the world — pushing the boundaries of safety. For thrill-seekers, chasing the rush is what it’s all about. Where lots of us would break into a cold sweat, they experience something different: calm, focus, even moments of sublime awe. So what is it that makes thrill-seekers different? On this episode, we investigate what fuels their desire for adventure, and ask when the pursuit of kicks becomes dangerous and disruptive. We hear stories about storm chasers, rocket builders, and hikers. We also talk to a psychologist who avoids thrills in his personal life, but is deeply invested in understanding why other people love it.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2022-05-20 Coping with Climate through Music

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 59:00

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Music and social movements have historically gone hand in hand. Folk music played a unifying role for the labor movements in the United States. Music was central to the protests against the Vietnam War and in favor of Civil Rights. As more people become aware of the climate crisis, music is starting to reflect that. 

Jayson Greene, contributing editor and former senior editor at Pitchfork and the author of the memoir Once More We Saw Stars, has seen increasing numbers of musicians processing the climate crisis through their work. “I discovered so many different musicians who are making music and the common thread was a sort of desperation. This had gotten too far for them not to start speaking on it. And I think that as you know, and just as art imitates life or let you know in every other respect that mirrors the public awareness of this issue.”  

But there is still no one song or artist unifying the climate movement the way music has for other movements. Why are more artists not raising the alarm over the impending climate catastrophe? 

Tamara Lindeman is a Toronto-based songwriter and singer who performs under the name The Weather Station. Her album Ignorance contains many themes related to climate. She believes there are multiple reasons why popular music hasn’t explored the climate crisis more deeply: 

“Part of what's wrong with this issue is people have so many personal feelings about it that keep them away from that feeling of indignance or of power or of a collective experience. I think that's why we don't have the climate anthem yet that people can jump onto, because there are so many barriers.”

Rather than attempting an anthem, Lindeman’s music expresses her personal, emotional reactions. She remembers first being worried about the climate when she was very young, “I mean I don't remember when I first heard the words, I mean global warming was what it was called at the time. But I think my parents told me pretty young because I do remember being really, really afraid in a very child way of this idea of the natural world changing irreparably.” 

Jayson Greene describes his own beliefs about the power of music to process emotion. “This is firmly how I believe music works. I think it's entirely a response we formulate to the feelings we don't know how to process. And yeah, so that's what I meant when I said that music is the hum our feelings make as we live... And we’re all feeling pretty bad about what we see.” 

Greene doesn’t believe artists can force a message on listeners, though. “I do believe that music is not a great container for political statements. You can put them in but they leak out the minute you give them to somebody. You can't believe that they're going to receive the message that you loaded in there like a message in a bottle because music is so personal, it speaks to that person.” 

Lindeman hopes music can have a unique impact on listeners, “I definitely believe really strongly in lyrics and in the intimate relationship between singer and listener. I think there's a lot of room for vulnerability because if you hear something and you’re alone maybe you can take it in a different way than you could if it's like a speech or a newscast.”

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

When Pigs Fly (#1571)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

Awww_logo_color_square In English, if we want to say that something will never occur, we say it'll happen when pigs fly or when hell freezes over. In Spanish, you can express this idea by saying it will happen "when cows fly," or el día que las vacas vuelen. In Italian, the same idea is reflected in a phrase that translates as "when donkeys fly." In Malay, that event will occur "when cats grow horns," in French "when chickens have teeth," and in Bulgarian "when the pig in yellow slippers climbs the pear tree." This rhetorical device is called an adynaton, from a Greek word that means "impossible." 


Kamela works as a nurse in Anchorage, Alaska. When she asked a patient how how he was doing post-surgery, the man responded with Well, I haven't grown gills yet. It's a jocular way of acknowledging that although he hadn't recovered completely, things could definitely be worse.


Two examples of adynaton, the rhetorical term for playful exaggeration suggesting that something will never happen, involve animals' tails. One German expression translates as "It'll happen when the hounds start barking with their tail," and a Latvian one translates as "It'll happen when an owl's tail blooms."


Alyssa from Dallas, Texas, is puzzled by some jargon she hears in her workplace. As a management consultant, she's often warned by her bosses to make sure that employees don't think that management is moving their cheese. The phrase references Spencer Johnson's 1998 bestseller, Who Moved My Cheese? (Bookshop|Amazon) This motivational fable is the story of two mice and two tiny humans caught in a maze, and how they adapt -- or don't -- when their usual food source is moved to another location.


How do you make the number one disappear? Hint: add a letter.


All the answers to this puzzle from Quiz Guy John Chaneski are two-word phrases, and the only vowel they contain is the letter A. For example, suppose John is lounging in a shaded spot where only one variety of fruit is allowed. Where is he?


Justin in Dallas, Texas, is curious about the origin of the name William, and why the Spanish version is Guillermo. Its popularity goes back to the days of William the Conqueror. Modern languages have several versions of this name, such as German Wilhelm and Dutch Willem. For a good explanation of the phonetic changes that led to these different versions, check out Trask's Historical Linguistics by R. L. Trask, revised and edited by Robert McColl Miller. (Bookshop|Amazon)


W. H. Auden's poem "As I Walked Out One Evening" contains some lovely examples of the rhetorical device called adynaton, including: I'll love you, dear, I'll love you / Till China and Africa meet, / And the river jumps over the mountain / And the salmon sing in the street.


The phrase do it up brown can have two very different meanings: to "do something to perfection," as in something that is perfectly cooked, and "to swindle" someone or beat them at their own game -- metaphorically leaving them "cooked."


The phrase salt of the earth describes someone who is essential and pure of heart, a reference to the biblical Sermon on the Mount. To salt the earth usually means to render the ground useless, whether metaphorically or literally.


Following up on our discussion about the many meanings of the word regret, we share David Ray's poem "Thanks, Robert Frost," which addresses hope for the past as well as hope for the future. This poem was read with permission of the author.


Kit calls from Pulaski, Tennessee, recalls that when he played hide-and-seek as a youngster in Miami, Florida, the call he and his friends used at the end of the game to draw everyone out of hiding was All y'all come in free!. However, he's aware of other versions and wonders if they're all variations of one original phrase. There's no written record of an original version, and since this phrase tends to get passed along more often by word of mouth more than in written form, it can be highly variable. The Dictionary of American Regional English lists dozens of versions, including Ole Ole Olson all in free and all-ee all-ee ump free and all home free.


The word adynaton, which refers to a jocular phrase that emphasizes the idea of  impossibility, was adopted into English from Greek, where adynaton means "impossible," a combination of a- meaning "not" and dynatos, which means "possible." This Greek word derives from a root that means "to have power," the source also of the English word dynamic. One Hungarian adynaton translates as "when it's snowing red." A Russian version translates as "when a crayfish whistles on top of a mountain." In Serbian and Croatian, the same idea is expressed by a phrase rendered in English as "when grapes grow on willow." The Roman poet Virgil expressed the idea of something doubly improbable with the idea of "when golden apples grow on oak trees."


Tabitha from Palmer, Alaska, remembers her mother used to exclaim Stop wooling me!, a phrase used in parts of Appalachia, the Southeast, and the Ozarks to mean "Stop roughhousing!" or "Stop tussling!"


Quinn from Excelsior, Minnesota, is five years old -- well, five-and-three-quarters, as she makes sure to point out. She wonders why the letter Q is so often followed by U. In Old English, the alphabet didn't include the letter Q. The word quick, for example, was spelled cwic. The QU combination was introduced as a result of the Norman invasion, reflecting the influence of Latin. Latin, in turn, had been influenced by the Etruscans, whose alphabet included the letter qoppa. Two wonderful books about the evolution of the letters we use today are Letter Perfect by David Sacks (Bookshop|Amazon) and Michael Rosen's Alphabetical: How Every Letter Tells a Story (Bookshop|Amazon).


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Mx101 Ep54: Native Americans In Rock , 11/11/2021

From KUNC & The Colorado Sound | Part of the Music 101 series | 57:00

Music_101_small The documentary, "Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked The World", highlighted the unsung contributions of Native Americans in rock music. Inspired by the documentary, on this episode of Music 101, we'll trace the influence of Native Americans in modern music.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR104: OHR Presents: Musical Families, 5/30/2022

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Purple_hulls_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, music by family, for family, and about family, performed by various artists recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Family life and ties are a big part of Ozark folk culture and music.  Come on home with us to the Ozarks as we enjoy a little “family time,” celebrating the joy of familial bonding through song.  Featured on this episode are a variety of artists including A.J. Croce, The Purple Hulls, Thom Bresh, Lukas & Eden Pool, The Gordons, The Honey Dewdrops, The Creek Rocks, The Lazy Goat String Band, The Weide Family, The Vogts Sisters, Love Hollar, and the Grandpa Jones Family Band.  We’ll hear songs by, for, and about family, many of them written by the artists themselves.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1981 archival recording of Ozark originals, husband & wife team Jim & Denise Lansford performing the song “Are You From Dixie” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater explores the strange tradition of “counting songs,” songs that feature counting numbers as part of their lyrics and meaning.  This episode includes, among other examples, the song “Bluebird,” written by folk music legend Jean Ritchie for her young sons.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 22-21: Queering the Food System with Ike Leslie, 5/20/2022

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 54:00

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This week on the show we’re questioning the traditions and assumptions around the role of family in farming. 

“When something goes wrong in the family relationship, it can really affect the farm business, and when something goes wrong in the farm business, it can really affect the family relationship–which has big implications for things like food security–although we often don’t look at it that way.”

My guest is sociologist Dr. Ike Leslie, of the University of New Hampshire. Join us for a conversation about Queering the Food System. 


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio (Series)

Produced by Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

311: The Secret World of Celebrity Catering with Mary Giuliani, 5/19/2022

From Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio | Part of the Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio series | 54:00

Msl_radio_logo_cobrand_prx_small Mary Giuliani, the author of catering tell-all “Tiny Hot Dogs,” idolizes Steve Martin in “The Jerk,” raises a murderous turtle and has a solution for any and every party disaster. Plus, we visit a Bhutanese Senior Lunch in Vermont; Adam Gopnik sells the role of coffee in civilization; and we dig into Soupe au Pistou from Provence. (Origionally aired April 11, 2019. Avaiable for rerun until May 26, 2022.)  

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

821: A Family Divided Over Jan. 6: 'Traitors Get Shot', 5/21/2022

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | 59:00

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On Jan. 6, 2021, Jackson Reffitt watched the Capitol riot play out on TV from his family home in Texas. His father, Guy, had a much closer view. He was in Washington, armed with a semiautomatic handgun, storming the building. 


When Guy Reffitt returned home, there were news stories about people being turned into authorities. Jackson says his dad warned him if he turned him in, he’d be a traitor, and that: “Traitors get shot.”


Jackson decided to secretly tape Guy, and turned the recordings over to the FBI. In the tapes, you can hear Guy bragging about what he did at the Capitol, saying: “I had every constitutional right to carry a weapon and take over the Congress.”


Guy was the first person to stand trial for his role in the riot, and the case has divided his family. 


This week, Reveal features the story of the Reffitt family by partnering with the podcast Will Be Wild from Pineapple Street Studios, Wondery and Amazon Music. Hosted by Andrea Bernstein and Ilya Marritz, Will Be Wild’s eight-part series investigates the forces that led to the Jan. 6 insurrection and what comes next.

With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Sidelines of the Mainstream (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

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LARP stands for Live Action Role Play. Think of it like Lord of the Rings comes to life, where you get to create your own character and wield foam swords on a mock-battlefield. But for many players, LARP is more than just fun and games - it's a lifeline to belonging. With Good Reason producer, Matt Darroch, has the story. And: Climate change, pollution, and development projects are threatening surf breaks all over the world. H. Gelfand says many surfers have taken up the mantle of environmental activism, becoming outspoken protectors of our oceans.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Today Antarctica, tomorrow Europa: Britney Schmidt explores under the ice

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

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Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 05/13/2022

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Lp1_small This week on the show: We dive underwater to visit creatures great and very, very small. Some of them are vocal, some are vital for the air we breathe and, sadly, many of them are threatened. How can we better protect life in the oceans? Plus — the environmental toll of your monthly bleed, and how menstrual products tell the story of the modern world, from capitalism to patriarchy to pollution.

Tara Austin

From WDSE | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
WDSE

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 220525 7am: ClassicalWorks (Episode 296), 5/25/2022 7:00 AM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 59:00

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 296)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse, LLC.

Most recent piece in this series:

2019.3: Jazz with David Basse 2019.3, 5/20/2022 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse, LLC. | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 01:00:00

Thumbnail_2021_small 15 hours a week.

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

Cruel Britannia

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 58:30

Screen_shot_2022-05-19_at_8 George Orwell said, “It’s so easy to be witty about the British Empire.” As in the throwaway line that English people had conquered the world in a fit of absentmindedness. No big deal. But that empire was no joke. Boris Johnson, in the Prime Minister’s office today, says he can’t forget that his nation over the last 200 years “has directed the invasion or conquest of 178 countries – that is: most of the members of the UN.” Our guest, the historian and prodigious imperial researcher Caroline Elkins has written a shocker of a big book about just how the English got to rule the world for two centuries, and it’s a gruesome story, all told. The title of her big book is Legacy of Violence, about the brutality of “thinking imperially” to this day.

Think of the British Empire in its day as a colossal trading company with the world’s number-one navy to police its traffic in pretty much everything—including about 3 million slaves to North America in the 17th and 18th centuries, also a variety of notably addictive substances like opium and oil, then sugar and tobacco. It thought of itself as a distinctively liberal empire, civilizing the people it exploited, and everywhere spreading the language of Milton and Shakespeare, free speech and the rule of law. That is the imperial line that our guest Caroline Elkins set out to bury with the official records of a police state and its practice of terror that ruled half a billion people at Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897. 

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions K21: Everybody Say "Yeah!" The Music of George Freeman

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Freeman_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we celebrate the 95th birthday of guitarist George Freeman on an album called "Everybody Say Yeah!" that includes music with brother Von Freeman and nephew Chico Freeman. The album draws from 26 years that Freeman has been with the Southport label and contains some previously unreleased tracks. Also, "Tiger Tail," the debut album of saxophonist Evan Drybread, and new music from saxophonist Doug Webb, and guitarist Brent Laidler, two artists who apply humor to the naming of some of their pieces. We also have new music from two drummer-led bands by guys named Dan -- Dan Schnelle and Daniel Glass, whose trio "jazzifies" a heavy metal standard.

promo included: promo-K21

Blue Dimensions G43: A Trinity Of "Presence"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Three recent albums all entitled "Presence," from Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, John Petrucelli, and Brad Whitely.

Evans_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we are surprised to note that three jazz albums entitled "Presence" have come out in 2018, and we've decided to draw music from all three of them - - one from pianist Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, some high-energy stuff recorded in concert at two jazz clubs in Philadelphia, one from pianist Brad Whitely, a strong studio recording, and another live one, a double album from saxophonist and composer John Petrucelli with lots of strings and a scallop shell used as an instrument as well. Three engaging and very different albums, all called "Presence," coming up in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: promo-G43

Feminine Fusion (Series)

Produced by WCNY

Most recent piece in this series:

S06 Ep38: Four and More, 5/21/2022

From WCNY | Part of the Feminine Fusion series | 58:30

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"If we were all determined to play first violin we would never have an ensemble.  Therefore, respect every musician in [their] place." - Robert Schumann

 

For a dedicated chamber group, their enjoyment of their music is inherent in every note.  This week, brass music, vocal music, even an electric string quartet, from all-female chamber ensembles.

 

Music in this episode:

Coldplay:  Atlas
Atlys
“Atlys”
Independent

Jetse Bremer:  Shall I compare the to a summer’s day? & Sigh No More, Ladies
Wishful Singing
“Time Travels”
Wishful Singing Productions

Camille Saint-Saens:  Africa, Op. 89
Salut Salon
“Carnival Fantasy”
Warner Music Group

John Williams, Klaus Doldinger, Kurt Weill:  Shark Medley
Salut Salon
“Carnival Fantasy”
Warner Music Group

Anthony Plog:  Mosaics
Stiletto Brass Quintet
“Stiletto Brass quintet with Doc Severinsen”
CD Baby

George Gershwin, arr. by Velvet Brown:  Summertime Fantasy
Stiletto Brass Quintet
“Stiletto Brass quintet with Doc Severinsen”
CD Baby

Philip Glass:  Suite from The Hours, Mvt. 1
La Pietà; Angèle Dubeau, conductor
“Ovation”
Analekta 28746

Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWFC-21-13: Beethovenfest Bonn: Big Orchestra for Mahler's "Resurrection" Symphony, 12/27/2021

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:58

Bfc_7853_a_small Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 2 is a force to reckon with. Known as the "Resurrection" symphony, it features both tender moments and apocalyptic ones, dancelike melodies but also passages of near chaos, and an energy that inspires one to forge onward. In other words, it was the perfect piece to conclude the 2021 Beethovenfest. The festival even borrowed its motto "Rise again, yes, rise again" from the final movement's chorus. In the last episode of this season's Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts, the young charismatic French conductor Maxime Pascale leads the renowned Mahler Chamber Orchestra and the Prague Philharmonic Choir in a stirring performance of this masterpiece that will set your sprits soaring.

High Country Celtic Radio (Series)

Produced by High Country Celtic Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

High Country Celtic Radio 216 - Buttons, Banjos, and Bagpipes

From High Country Celtic Radio | Part of the High Country Celtic Radio series | 59:00

High-country-celtic-240x240_small [This episode previously aired 7/17/21]
It's the Three Instruments of the Apocalypse: Accordions, Banjos, and Bagpipes. Although the butt of jokes and subject of cartoons, in the hands of skilled players, these instruments showcase traditional Celtic music in the best possible light.

The artists we play this week are: Mary Rafferty; Angelina Carberry & Martin Quinn; Dermot Byrne, Éamonn Coyne & John Doyle; Solas; Fásta; Kathryn Tickell; Aoibheann & Pamela Quelly; Beoga; Louise Mulcahy; Sharon Shannon; Boxing Banjo; Theresa O'Grady; Lily Gems & Eileen O' Driscoll; Josephine Marsh; Joe Burke; and Mick McAuley.

Our FairPlé score this week is 63

Celebrating the Birthday of Bucky Pizzarelli

From KCUR | Part of the 12th Street Jump Weekly series | 59:00

(Air Dates: December 31 - January 8) On this week's archive episode of 12th Street Jump, we celebrate the music of Bucky Pizzarelli with Bucky himself and his long time music partner Ed Laub. We'll play a game of "So, What's Your Question" with Ed and talk to Bucky about what gives him the blues.

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Public Radio's weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, 12th STREET JUMP celebrates America's original art form, live from one of its birthplaces, 12th Street in Kansas City. That is where Basie tickled and ivories and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues. Each week, host Ebony Fondren offers up a lively hour of topical sketch comedy and some great live jazz and blues from the 12th STREET JUMP band (musical director Joe Cartright, along with Tyrone Clark on bass and Arnold Young on drums) and vocalist David Basse. Special guests join the fun every week down at the 12th Street Jump.

Notes from the Jazz Underground #44 - Jazz in Chicago, 2019

From WDCB | Part of the Notes from the Jazz Underground series | 58:00

With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.

Nftju_logo_small_small With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.