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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

386: The Magic of Energy, 5/7/2021

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 59:00

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small Energy fuels our lives in ways that seem almost magical. It can transform darkness into light, cold into warmth, water into ice. Of course, it’s science — not magic — but like magic, there are rules that must be followed. One of the fundamental laws of physics is that energy can never be created or destroyed, only converted from one form to another. On this episode, we explore what these rules mean for our quest to create new power sources, and for life on earth. We hear stories about what makes batteries a feat of engineering — and sometimes its Achilles’ heel. We also hear about the ongoing quest to create “fusion energy,” and the roadblocks standing in the way.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2021-04-30 Distorted Democracy and the “Zero-Sum Game”

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 58:59

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Speakers:
Heather McGhee, Political Strategist & Author, The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together
Rebecca Willis, Researcher & Author, Too Hot to Handle? The Democratic Challenge of Climate Change

In the US, we’ve become accustomed to climate -- like nearly everything else -- being politicized. Even when potential solutions might benefit everyone, a zero-sum mentality has taken hold, where there’s an “us” and a “them” and progress for them comes at the expense of us.

“When you can be divided and get easily manipulated into cheering the destruction of things that could be beneficial to part of the American people. says political strategist Heather McGhee, “that's making life harder for everyone.”

McGhee is board chair of Color of Change, the nation's largest online racial justice organization, and author of the new book, The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together. In it she argues that racism in our politics and policymaking is distorting our ability to respond to big problems that require collective solutions by framing them as a so-called zero-sum game.

“The belief is that there's only so much to go around and what is good for an ‘other’ is bad for us,” she explains. “You can't dig into the social science data and see how much racial resentment became highly correlated ... with white public opinion on issues that nominally should have nothing to do with race during the Obama era.”

But does it have to be this way? In the UK, for example, climate politics are rarely marked by the partisan and racial divides of the American climate debate.

“We still have a very consensual approach to climate change,” says Rebecca Willis from Lancaster University, author of Too Hot to Handle? The Democratic Challenge of Climate Change, noting that the UK’s 2008 Climate Act has endured across conservative and progressive governments. Willis sees both a promise and a warning in US climate politics, as well as broader implications for global climate action. 

“Maybe this is democracy’s moment,” she says, “maybe this is the time that we see that we need collective action because we sure as hell can't solve this one as individuals working through the market.”

RELATED LINKS:
Color of Change
The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together 
Too Hot to Handle? The Democratic Challenge of Climate Change

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Little Shavers (#1538)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

Awww_logo_color_square Martha recommends Greek to Me: Adventures of the Comma Queen, a deeply personal, exuberant account of falling in love with both ancient and modern Greek by Mary Norris, former copy editor for The New Yorker. Norris shares several intriguing modern Greek terms, such as  diaphani memvrani, or "cellophane," which is cognate with English diaphanous membrane. Another is the modern Greek word for "newspaper," which is ephemerida, a relative of the English word ephemeral, which literally means "lasting but for a day."


Jesse from Newport News, Virginia, wonders about the expression potato quality meaning "poor quality." For at least a decade, commenters on YouTube have used the phrase recorded with a potato to criticize a heavily pixelated or otherwise blurry video.


Jerry in Lutherville, Maryland, was reading a 2018 biography of Nelson Algren, author of The Man with the Golden Arm, that mentions a group in the 1930s that were described as hipsters or hepsters. In the 1930s, the word hipster applied to a jazz aficionado who was in the know about all the cool places to be. Years later, the term hipster came to apply to others who were similarly in the know about such cutting-edge culture as as the best beer, the coolest clothes, the best podcasts. The term hippie, which denotes "a member of the counterculture," probably derives from this word, as do hip and hep, which describe someone "in the know."


It's Quiz Guy John Chaneski's annual wrap-up of the year in limerick form. For example, a notable news story from 2019 is suggested by this rhyme: In China the scientists croon / A triumphant spacefaring tune / They're fans of Pink Floyd / Or so I have hoid / They landed a craft on the . . . what?


Matt from Portage, Wisconsin, says that as a musician, he often finds himself focused on analyzing the structure and quality of a piece of music rather than just sitting back and enjoying it with everyone else. He asks if the hosts face a similar challenge when listening to casual conversation or reading for pleasure. The answer is yes!


If you say you're going to repair to the drawing room after dinner, meaning that that you will "go" to that room, you're using a word that's completely different from the verb repair meaning "to fix." These words come from different roots. The repair that means "to go" derives from the Latin word repatriare, a relative of English repatriate, meaning "to return to one's own country." The other repair meaning "to mend" comes Latin reparare meaning "to restore."


Janie says that when she moved to Nantucket, Massaschusetts, she'd hear oldtimers there describe something in positive terms by saying it was some good. The some here functions as an intensifier that simply means very. This expression isn't limited to Nantucket; it's heard in many parts of the United States.


Why do we refer to small children as little shavers?


Grant recommends the book All This Could Be Yours, the latest novel by Jami Attenberg. A dark glimpse of a family with an imperious father in a coma, and the family comes to terms with his life and effect on them. If you're familiar with her earlier book The Middlesteins, you'll recognize the same sharp, well-observed writing. Other recommendations for the book lovers on your holiday gift list: A Velocity of Being: Letters to a Young Reader, the lavishly illustrated anthology of letters edited by Maria Popova of Brainpickings and Claudia Bedrick, and Because Internet: Understanding the New Rules of Language is a smart, engaging, introduction to language and linguistics by linguist Gretchen McCulloch.


Elijah from Akron, Ohio, was surprised when his girlfriend Jenny observed that he was zhuzhing his hair. Elijah was skeptical that zhuzh, meaning "to make more attractive," was actually a word, until he heard others use it. The word was popularized by Carson Kressley in the original Queer Eye for the Straight Guy reality TV series from the early 2000s. He'd use the word  to denote the action of making something prettier. Variant spellings include zhoosh and joosh, and the term seems to have arisen from secret lingo popular in parts of the gay community in the United Kingdom in the 1960s. The term may derive in turn from a Romany term, zhouzho,  meaning to "clean" or "neaten."


Some succinct words of wisdom from English poet Robert Southey: If you would be pungent, be brief; for it is with words as with sunbeams -- the more they are condensed, the deeper they burn.


Brian in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, reports that whenever someone dropped a fork in his house, his mother would say Fork to the floor, company's at the door. She'd also say If your palm itches, you're going to come into money, and If your nose itches, you're going to kiss a fool, and often repeated a superstition that if the first person to enter your house on New Year's Day was a dark-haired person who gave you silver, you'd have good luck the rest of the year.


Jordan from Steinbach, Manitoba, Canada, says that when he used the word gitch, his colleagues from the United States had no idea it meant "underwear." The Second Edition of A Dictionary of Canadianisms on Historical Principles has a great entry that includes this term. It's more commonly seen as gotchies, with several variants, including gotch, gonchies, gaunch, gauch, and gitch. The term derives from similar-sounding Eastern European terms for "underwear."


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Mx101 Ep97: Boston Music Scene, 5/6/2021

From KUNC & The Colorado Sound | Part of the Music 101 series | 56:59

Music_101_recent_small Boston doesn't just hold an important place in the shaping of the United States. Boston also has a rich music history. This week, we'll explore Boston music from the "Bosstown Sound" of the late 1960s to today.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR145: OHR Presents: The Steep Canyon Rangers, 5/10/2021

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Steep_canyon_rangers_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Grammy Award winning North Carolina modern bluegrass supergroup The Steep Canyon Rangers recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with the band’s leader and mandolin Jedi Mike Guggino.

“Steep Canyon Rangers are Asheville, North Carolina’s GRAMMY winners, perennial Billboard chart-toppers, and frequent collaborators of the renowned banjoist (and occasional comedian) Steve Martin.

The Rangers are made up of Woody Platt on guitar and vocals, Graham Sharp on banjo and vocals, Mike Guggino on mandolin/mandola and vocals, Nicky Sanders on fiddle and vocals, Mike Ashworth on drums and vocals, and Barrett Smith on bass and vocals.

Steep Canyon Rangers have been on a journey that is uniquely their own. The band started in college at UNC-Chapel Hill, then dove head first into bluegrass in its most traditional form, and over the years have risen to the top of the bluegrass genre headlining top festivals such as Merlefest and Grey Fox Bluegrass.  Only to then be discovered by Steve Martin, famous actor and banjo player.  Martin has taken the Rangers on a nearly decade long tour introducing them to hundreds of thousands of new fans and giving them prime time TV exposure.  This has helped SCR become the most recognizable modern name in bluegrass music.  The band has continued to tour extensively on their own, without Martin, and have expanded their genre into country and Americana with the addition of a drummer, alongside an incredibly versatile bassist - to accompany the original core band.  The Rangers are big players in the bluegrass/country and Americana scene today.  They are often compared to predecessors The Band, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, and the modern Zac Brown Band.” - https://www.steepcanyon.com/about  

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1978 archival recording of Ozark originals Frank Ellis, Cathy Barton, and Taylor McBain performing the classic tune “Grey Eagle” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 21-20: Growing Staple Foods And What It Means To Grow Enough, 5/14/2021

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 54:00

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“There’s a feeling to it that’s kind of satisfying in that way. It doesn’t feel so much like we could survive on it, as we’re able to provide some of our sort of staple foods.”

On today’s show we visit a farm East of Bloomington Indiana, to speak with Denise and Sean Breeden Ost about growing food, preserving food and eating food. We check out their dry bean threshing techniques and reflect on the notion of self-sufficiency in the midst of a pandemic. 


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio (Series)

Produced by Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

513: Zen and the Art of Cooking Vegetables, 5/6/2021

From Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio | Part of the Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio series | 54:01

Msl_radio_logo_cobrand_prx__2___1__medium_small Chef Eric Ripert teaches us how to make vegetables the star of the plate. Plus, we take a deep dive into the food and cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean, Adam Gopnik reveals his five food heresies, and we learn how to make Japanese Milk Bread.

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

719: Why Police Reform Fails, 5/8/2021

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | :00

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With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Plant Music (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

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If plants could talk, what would they say? What if they could sing? Sam Nester, Yassmin Salem, and Donald Russell explain how George Mason University’s Arcadia installation turns a greenhouse into an orchestra. And: Fossils give away the secrets of the past, but they can also tell the future. Rowan Lockwood is taking a closer look at the fossils of giant oysters to learn how to rebuild oyster reefs today. Lockwood was named a 2019 Virginia Outstanding Faculty Award recipient.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Author Andy Weir and Project Hail Mary

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

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Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 04/23/2021

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

Lp1_small Earth Day, eco activists on TikTok and nuclear energy post-Chernobyl - In this episode of Living Planet, we hear about some of the different ways ordinary people relate to environmental issues in different parts of the world. Climate activists talk about using TikTok to reach Generation Z. And 35 years after the Chernobyl disaster, we'll hear how people in Russia and China view the future of nuclear energy.

Tara Austin

From KUMD | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
KUMD

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

CLW 210508 11PM: ClassicalWorks (Episode 275), 5/8/2021 11:00 PM

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 58:58

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 275)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse, LLC.

Most recent piece in this series:

1834.3: Jazz with David Basse 1834.3, 5/7/2021 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse, LLC. | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 01:00:00

Thumbnail_2021_small 15 hours a week.

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

Armenia in History and the Heart

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 59:00

Screen_shot_2021-04-29_at_5 Where is Armenia, the place, the idea? Where then? Where now? And how come the delight on top of the darkness in saying “I am Armenian”? Armenians were a tiny, ancient Indo-European people, between East and West, the first Christian nation, when Turkey wiped most of them off the map in 1915. It was the twentieth century’s grotesque model of mass slaughter of a people, a genocide by any measure. Yet there the Armenians are today—6, 7, maybe 8 million people in 80 countries of the world: a lively, secret club, somebody said: invisible to non-members but instantly recognizable to other Armenians. A world people with their own alphabet, language, cuisine, music, nightmares abounding—but art, too, and humor, despite everything.

The mass slaughter of Armenians in Turkey starting in 1915 is a bone still stuck in the throat of history. And it’s a jagged scar, an area of darkness in the hearts of a global diaspora. More than a million people were killed, much more than half of the Armenian nation, a century ago. It’s an atrocity brazenly denied ever since by the government of Turkey, a crime unrecognized by most nations, acknowledged finally as a genocide this spring by President Biden. Both branches of Congress voted that verdict against Ottoman Turkey two years ago. We’re listening this radio hour not for the politics of the story but for the personal experience of unspeakable loss among survivors and their descendants—family histories too horrible to be forgotten, or remembered. 

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions J19: Benito Gonzalez Sings To The World On His Piano

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Gonzalessing_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, the spotlight shines on pianist Benito Gonzalez. We'll hear several tracks from his new album "Sing To The World" featuring among others bassist Christian McBride and trumpeter Nicholas Payton as well as drummer Jeff "Tain" Watts and a Russian drummer not known to many in the US, Sasha Mashin. We'll also hear Benito Gonzalez on a 2018 album with bassist Essiet Essiet and drummer Gerry Gibbs  that was a tribute to McCoy Tyner, and Gonzalez on the piano with one of Tyner's best bandmates, saxophonist Azar Lawrence, doing a Tyner classic from Lawrence's album "Mystic Journey." Plus new music from trombonist Michael Dease, and from saxophonist Gary Bartz with his contribution to the ongoing "Jazz Is Dead" album series.

Blue Dimensions G43: A Trinity Of "Presence"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Three recent albums all entitled "Presence," from Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, John Petrucelli, and Brad Whitely.

Evans_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we are surprised to note that three jazz albums entitled "Presence" have come out in 2018, and we've decided to draw music from all three of them - - one from pianist Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, some high-energy stuff recorded in concert at two jazz clubs in Philadelphia, one from pianist Brad Whitely, a strong studio recording, and another live one, a double album from saxophonist and composer John Petrucelli with lots of strings and a scallop shell used as an instrument as well. Three engaging and very different albums, all called "Presence," coming up in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: promo-G43

Feminine Fusion (Series)

Produced by WCNY

Most recent piece in this series:

S05 Ep36: Music on the Wind, Part 3, 5/8/2021

From WCNY | Part of the Feminine Fusion series | 58:30

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“To most human beings, wind is an irritation.  To most trees, wind is a song.”  - Mokokoma Mokhonoana

This week we feature Music on the Wind!  Outstanding performances from wind players, as well as a recent composition showcasing the saxophone.  These works span a wide range of styles and eras.  Even with the vast repertoire of existing works available to wind players, there are always new works to be composed and discovered.

 

Music on this episode:

Igor Stravinsky:  Three Pieces for Solo Clarinet
Bettina Aust, clarinet
"Fin de Siecle"
Genuin 21279

Patrick Roux:  Soledad
Gruca White Ensemble: Linda White, flute; Robert Gruca, guitar
"A Different Take"
Big Round 8964

Ennio Morricone:  Gabriel's Oboe
Danna Sundet, oboe
Panoràmicos
"Reflections"
Independent Label

Alexis Ciesla:  Dança de Lisboa
Shannon Lowe, bassoon
Kristin Pfeifer Yu & Ken Davis, violins
Laurel Yu, viola; Steven Taylor, cello; Maurice Belle, double bass
"A Musical Bouquet: Old, New and Borrowed Works for Bassoon and Strings"
MSR Classics 1773

Stacy Garrop:  Quicksilver
Jonathan Hulting-Cohen, saxophone
UMass Wind Ensemble; Matthew Westgate, conductor
"Quicksilver"
MSR Classics 1746

Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWF 20-26: Best of the Beethovenfest, 3/29/2021

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:58

Harnoncourt_nikolaus_small Even with the impact of the coronavirus on music life in Germany, we've been able to fill most of the programs with fresh concert recordings. But this time we're taking a look back at Deutsche Welle's two decade-long year media partnership with the Beethovenfest in Bonn. In a "Best of the Beethovenfest," Beethoven, Haydn, Franck and Bruckner are brought to life by Harnoncourt, Dudamel, Brendel, Rattle, Masur and Norrington.

High Country Celtic Radio (Series)

Produced by High Country Celtic Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

High Country Celtic Radio 162 - Bealtaine

From High Country Celtic Radio | Part of the High Country Celtic Radio series | 59:00

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[This episode originally aired 5/11/19] 
Thugamar Féin an Samhradh Linn--"We Have Brought The Summer With Us."  It's Bealtaine, one of the four major Celtic fire festivals, so Joe and Katie dig up joyful tunes and songs dealing with Bealtaine, the first of May, and the coming of summer. During Bealtaine, the Celts would  (and still do) build bonfires, then drive their cattle between the fires for luck.  Granted, this is not something we should do in the pine forests and sagebrush of the High Sierra, but it was certainly a way for ancient Celts to connect to nature and the coming of summer. For us modern folks, we can revel in the delightful music inspired by the festival of Beltaine.
To help bring in the month of May and the first whispers of Summer, we play tracks from Kevin Crawford, Mick Conneely & David Munnelly, John McSherry, Zoë Conway, The Here & Now, Lá Lugh, Lúnasa, James Keane, The Bothy Band, Kevin Burke, Mick O'Brien, Martin Quinn & Angelina Carberry, The Alt, and Becky Tracy. 
Our FairPlé score this week: 43

Celebrating the Birthday of Bucky Pizzarelli

From KCUR | Part of the 12th Street Jump Weekly series | 59:00

(Air Dates: December 31 - January 8) On this week's archive episode of 12th Street Jump, we celebrate the music of Bucky Pizzarelli with Bucky himself and his long time music partner Ed Laub. We'll play a game of "So, What's Your Question" with Ed and talk to Bucky about what gives him the blues.

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Public Radio's weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, 12th STREET JUMP celebrates America's original art form, live from one of its birthplaces, 12th Street in Kansas City. That is where Basie tickled and ivories and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues. Each week, host Ebony Fondren offers up a lively hour of topical sketch comedy and some great live jazz and blues from the 12th STREET JUMP band (musical director Joe Cartright, along with Tyrone Clark on bass and Arnold Young on drums) and vocalist David Basse. Special guests join the fun every week down at the 12th Street Jump.

Notes from the Jazz Underground #44 - Jazz in Chicago, 2019

From WDCB | Part of the Notes from the Jazz Underground series | 58:00

With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.

Nftju_logo_small_small With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.