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Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

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The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

458: The Evolution of Plastic Surgery, 9/23/2022

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 59:01

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small During World War I, thousands of soldiers suffered catastrophic facial injuries. If these soldiers survived their injuries, they were often shunned once they got back home. Some were forced to sit on brightly painted blue benches so that the public knew not to look at them. Many became isolated — sometimes their fiancées broke off their engagements, or their families rejected them — and came to feel that their lives were no longer worth living. But then a daring surgeon entered the picture — one who was determined to repair and even rebuild these men’s injured faces: Harold Gillies. On this episode, we talk with medical historian Lindsey Fitzharris about her new book “The Facemaker: A Visionary Surgeon's Battle to Mend the Disfigured Soldiers of World War I,” which traces Gillies’ pioneering mission to reconstruct faces. We hear about how he gathered together artists, radiographers, dental surgeons, and more for novel collaborations, their miraculous results, and how Gillies’ efforts led to the birth of modern reconstructive surgery.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

2022-09-23 The Inflation Reduction Act Passed. Now What?

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | 59:00

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In August, President Biden signed the Inflation Reduction Act into law. The IRA allocates around $370 billion over ten years to invest in renewable energy, make EVs more affordable, address climate inequities, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help mitigate the climate crisis. 

The IRA follows the passage of the bipartisan CHIPS and Science Act and Bipartisan Infrastructure Act. Taken together, the Biden administration hopes to jump-start a new era of U.S.-led innovation, research and economic growth. Carla Frisch, Principal Deputy Director at the Office of Policy for the U.S. Department of Energy, paints the picture of how the three bills work together:

“The analogy there we’ve been thinking about is the backbone, the brain and the lungs. So, the backbone being the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law...Then there's the brain, the CHIPS and Science Act and chips being the semiconductors that are in our cars, our computers, our cellphones. And then the third piece is the lung. So, breathing into that clean energy economy, the Inflation Reduction Act incentivizes deployment of clean technologies and really focus on lowering costs for American families.”

But like any law, the way the money is doled out matters, and the law’s implementation will ultimately determine its success. Frisch explains, “It does take time but I can tell you we’ve got a very committed team in the federal government right now and civil servants who are digging in and been waiting for the opportunity to rent some of these programs and already really moving forward quickly.”

Ryan Panchadsaram is adviser to the chairman of venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins, co-author of Speed & Scale, and also served as Deputy Chief Technology Officer of the United States during the Obama Administration. He says, “One thing to think about is actually as a series of laws that have passed that are going to make a lot of the climate realities we want to come to bear. So, in the earlier laws you have demonstration projects you have funding from things like the loan program office now they can support the building out of factories and facilities. And then you have really demand oriented incentives to make the purchasing of it cheaper in the market, right. So, you actually can get not only the factories created the supply there and actually the demand flowing.”

The Inflation Reduction Act promises to pour a ton of money into electrifying transportation. But new rules now restrict which electric vehicles qualify for a $7500 tax credit, limiting the cash back to models made in North America. But that’s only until January, then there are even more rules. Dan Bowerson, Senior Director of Energy & Environment at the Alliance for Automotive Innovation, the car industry trade group, explains: 

“It gets much more complicated starting in January 1, 2023. So, the first thing that happens is that 200,000 vehicle cap is gone. So, for companies that had already hits that cap General Motors and Tesla that cap is no longer in play. It also implements a MSRP cap. So, it's $80,000 for vans, SUVs and pickups and $55,000 for cars. We also see the implementation of income cap. So, for couples filing jointly if you make over $300,000 you would not be eligible for a tax credit. And for individuals making over 150,000 you would be ineligible.”

In addition to all of the money and programs written into the IRA, legislators also defined carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses as pollutants. This is seen as an attempt to mitigate the damage done by the Supreme Court’s West Virginia v. EPA ruling, which severely limited the EPA’s ability to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. Dean of Berkeley Law Erwin Chemerinsky explains how the Congressional clarification might affect the implementation of the Supreme Court’s ruling:

 “I think it changes the impact in that it makes clear that greenhouse gas emissions. Are pollutants. On the other hand, I don't know that that addresses the concern that the Supreme court had in West Virginia versus EPA, West Virginia versus EPA said the Congress hadn't been sufficiently specific in giving EPA the authority to regulate power plants in a certain way. So as to reduce greenhouse gas emissions or to put it most simply, I think it goes part of the way to addressing what the Supreme court said, but it doesn't go all the way.” 

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Salad Days (#1582)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

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Drain, gobble hole, and live catch are all terms used by pinball enthusiasts. Drain refers to "the space between flippers," a gobble hole swallows up the ball, and live catch refers to "catching the ball on a flipper and balancing it before sending it in a specific direction."
Kaitlyn from Rye, New York, is puzzled by people referring to their youth as their salad days. It's drawn from a metaphor employed at the end of Act One of Antony and Cleopatra by William Shakespeare. Cleopatra recalls a past dalliance with Julius Caesar, and says it occurred when she was "green in judgment, cold in blood," much like a salad would be fresh and green. 
Our conversation about women who use the nicknames Gertie or Gert as jokingly affectionate terms for each other, prompted a listener in Melbourne, Australia, to speculate that it's a nod to Gertrude Lawrence, an English performer who rose to international fame in the early 20th century. Another possibility, though, is the character of Gertrude the telephone operator on The Jack Benny Program, a radio show in the United States that was wildly popular and ran for more than 30 years. Gertrude's character is heard talking with her fellow operator Mabel in this episode starting at 22:30. 
Quincy from Bozeman, Montana, wonders how burritos came to be named with a Spanish word that means "little donkey." In Spanish, the meaning of burro has also extended from "donkey" to "sawhorse." In the case of the tortilla-wrapped comfort food, there are several possible explanations, although the most likely appears to be the resemblance between a tortilla draped over multiple ingredients and a blanket thrown across the back of a donkey, which also bears a heavy load of items. The Dictionary of Chicano Folklore (Bookshop|Amazon) suggests another possibility: burritos were a valued companion for vaqueros out on the trail, somewhat like the way burros are valuable companions for horses, because their presence tends to calm those potentially jittery animals.
Quiz Guy John Chaneski has a puzzle that's taking off -- literally. He offers clues that suggest two words, one of those words being formed by removing the initial H from the other. For example, what two words are suggested by I crept down the house from room to room, and the entire house was empty?
A native Dutch speaker who spent many years in Japan says he had to learn the hard way that when Americans greeted him with How are you?, they didn't really want to know how he was. Such casual greetings that don't require a factual or detailed answer are an example of phatic speech, a term coined by linguist Walter Redfern. It's speech that's less about literal meaning and more about social function and politeness.  
Listeners continue to weigh in on the topic of what to call those impromptu, free-for-all dinners at home where everyone just cobbles together their own dish with whatever leftovers or ingredients are handy. Frances writes from Bluffton, South Carolina, with her mother's sophisticated-sounding name for those assorted leftovers: Cream of Frigidaire.
Why are detectives in old movies and mystery novels called gumshoes? The term gumshoe derives from the image of shoes with soles made of gum rubber, which offered an improvement over the wood traditionally used for the bottom of a shoe, since those rubbery soles allow the wearer to tiptoe quietly without being detected. Gumshoe has been applied to investigators and police officers for more than a century, although it's also been applied to prowlers and others who resort to stealth for accomplishing nefarious goals.
Dan from Atlantic Beach, Florida, grew up in southwestern Ohio, where he and his friends and family referred to their neighborhoods as plats, as in What plat do you live in? To plat a place is jargon for the process of making a detailed map with key features of the area. A plat is a piece of land for which plans are being made. Plat is a variant of the English word plot.
The documentary My Beautiful Stutter follows youngsters at a summer camp run by SAY: The Stuttering Association for the Young. There young people who stutter find acceptance, support, and confidence for navigating the larger world. 
Paige grew up in Louisiana, where she used the term pencil colors for colored pencils. Her name for these drawing instruments is likely a calque from French crayon de couleur, literally "pencil of color." In many small towns across the United States, school districts traditionally published in the newspaper lists of supplies that students needed to purchase for the coming year. Newspapers in Louisiana and parts of Mississippi from the 1960s well into the 2000s often included the term pencil colors in those student supply lists.
Pianist, singer, songwriter, and activist Nina Simone was one of the most iconic performers of the 20th century, and her song "Young, Gifted, and Black," became an anthem of the civil rights movement. Children's book editor Traci N. Todd tells Simone's story in an inspiring new book for children, Nina: A Story of Nina Simone. (Bookshop|Amazon). The book is illustrated by Christian Robinson, who also illustrated Matt de la Peña's Newbery Medal-winning book Last Stop on Market Street (Bookshop|Amazon).
A North Carolina listener says that when he was a boy and asked for something at a store that his father didn't want to buy, his dad would reply Not today, Josephine. The origins of this phrase are unclear, although there is a story that it refers to Napoleon Bonaparte, who couldn't keep up with his wife's sexual voracity, and supposedly had to keep refusing her with Not tonight, Josephine. The story may well be apocryphal, however.
Paul in Camden, Maine, has adopted a new pup, and the dog's exuberant face-licking has Paul wondering about the many meanings of the word lick, which include getting his licks in and takes a licking, which refers to the act of forcefully beating someone or something. With roots that stretch back more than a thousand years to Old English liccian, meaning "to pass the tongue lightly over a surface," lick has come to mean a variety of things, including "a small amount" and "to vanquish." More recently, some youngsters are boasting about devious licks, stealing items from school and showing them off on TikTok. Lick is a great example of polysemy, the capacity for a word or phrase to have more than one meaning.    
This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Music 101 (Series)

Produced by KUNC & The Colorado Sound

Most recent piece in this series:

Mx101 Ep54: Native Americans In Rock , 11/11/2021

From KUNC & The Colorado Sound | Part of the Music 101 series | 57:00

Music_101_small The documentary, "Rumble: The Indians Who Rocked The World", highlighted the unsung contributions of Native Americans in rock music. Inspired by the documentary, on this episode of Music 101, we'll trace the influence of Native Americans in modern music.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR167: OHR Presents: Songs of Farewell, 10/3/2022

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Lula_wiles_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, songs about saying goodbye performed by a variety of artists recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.

Farewells have produced some of our most powerful and emotional works of art.  Goodbye is a theme endlessly explored in paintings, sculpture, literature and film.  Music is no different.  In this episode, we’ll hear songs of farewell written for everything from beloved people, to places, careers, innocence, life, and even a horse.  Featured are experimental folk ensemble Jayme Stone & the Lomax Project with Moira Smiley, renowned cowboy singer Don Edwards, the Paul Brock Band with Dennis Carey & Dave Curley, Smithsonian Folkways artists Anna & Elizabeth, Scottish fiddler Alasdair Fraser with cellist Natalie Haas, Texas swing and bluegrass phenomenon The Purple Hulls, John McEuen of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Smithsonian Folkways artists Lula Wiles, traditional fiddler Bruce Molsky, folk singer and actor Joe Purdy & friends, and ubiquitous cowboy cadre Riders in the Sky.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Bob Blair performing the traditional song “Who Will Sing?” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Renowned folk musician Aubrey Atwater presents songs about home.  Leaving home, missing home, and going home are all themes of Aubrey’s segment this week.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 22-39: A conversation with Jori Lewis, author of Slaves for Peanuts, 9/23/2022

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 54:01

Ee_logo_small This week on the show, Kayte Young talks with Jori Lewis. She’s an award winning journalist and the author of the book Slaves For Peanuts--a book about the natural and human history of the peanut and the role it played in West Africa as the transatlantic slave trade was being abolished.

Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

839: After Ayotzinapa: Breakthroughs and Setbacks, 9/24/2022

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | 59:00

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Eight months after Reveal’s three-part series about the disappearance of 43 Mexican college students in 2014, the government’s investigation is in high gear. But parents of the missing still don’t have the answers they want. There have been arrests and indictments of high-profile members of the military, and even the country’s former attorney general. But no one has been convicted, and the remains of only a handful of students have been identified. 


In the first segment, we relive the night of the attack on the students, and chronicle the previous government’s flawed investigation into the crime. We meet independent investigators who succeeded in getting close to the truth, then fled the country for their safety. 


Then we explore how the election of a new Mexican government led to a new investigation led by Omag Gomez Trejo, a young lawyer who pledged to expose the truth about the crime. 


We end with a conversation with Reveal’s Anayansi Diaz Cortes and Kate Doyle, from the National Security Archive. They bring us up to date on what’s happened with the investigation since we aired our three-part series, After Ayotzinapa.

With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Who Runs the World (Half Hour)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

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Tensions over Taiwan are making U.S.-China relations even more fraught. We discuss what the two nuclear powers want to do with the small island that is also a technological giant.


Also: In China, the civilian groups that have formed after natural disasters have become one step toward building a civil society within an authoritarian government.  However, Chinese government often monitors who is emerging as helpful and who might be anti-authority.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Countdown to DART: Will We Move an Asteroid?

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Dart_artist_concept_with_asteroid_small_small We are less than a week from the DART spacecraft’s impact on asteroid moonlet Dimorphos as this episode is published. Mission Coordination Lead Nancy Chabot gives us a status update and a preview of what to expect during the September 26 encounter. Bruce Betts’ new What’s Up space trivia contest reminds us of another cosmic impact back in 2005.  Hear and discover more at https://www.planetary.org/planetary-radio/2022-dart-impact-preview-nancy-chabot

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

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Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 09/23/22

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

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Glaciers may only exist in certain cold corners of the world, but just like tropical rainforests, peatlands, wetlands and oceans, they support life on Earth hundreds of thousands of kilometres away — by regulating ocean temperature, freshwater supply and our climate. In this episode, we hear why ice is so integral to the planet as a functioning global ecosystem, and some radical ideas to stop it from melting.


Switzerland's glacial loss (ARD)
Mathias Zahn (sp. Shola Lawal)

Emmons: The only glacier in the world that's getting bigger
Ashli Blow

Interview: Can we stop the world's ice sheets from melting? w/Adam Levy
Charli Shield

How Essen turned from industrial heartland city to green capital (ex-IE)
Natalie CarneySwitzerland's glacial loss (ARD)
Mathias Zahn (sp. Shola Lawal)

Emmons: The only glacier in the world that's getting bigger
Ashli Blow

Interview: Can we stop the world's ice sheets from melting? w/Adam Levy
Charli Shield

How Essen turned from industrial heartland city to green capital (ex-IE)
Natalie Carney

Tara Austin

From WDSE | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
WDSE

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

ClassicalWorks (Episode 182)

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 59:00

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 182)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse, LLC.

Most recent piece in this series:

1824.3: Jazz with David Basse 1824.3, 9/30/2022 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse, LLC. | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 01:00:00

Thumbnail_2021_small 15 hours a week.

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

Lovecraft Country (Rerun)

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 59:00

Cthulhu_small H. P. Lovecraft’s frightful horror fiction—dated between Edgar Allan Poe’s and Stephen King’s—is the weirdest of the weird. Lovecraft found ravenous, man-eating rats in the walls and foundations of our houses, and in our hearts and dreams just as creepily. For Halloween readers, he gave us ocean monsters the size of mountains; also, slippery scaly fish-people, flipping, flopping, and talking their way down the streets of Lovecraft’s favorite coastal towns near witchy Salem and the north of New England. There’s an idea in these stories—about human ignorance in an evil sea of telepathic enemies. There’s an open landscape, too, where horror fiction is growing a new crop.

If you’re sensing something ancient, cosmically vast, inescapable and frightening this Halloween season, you may be catching a Lovecraftian breeze. Howard Phillips Lovecraft was a lonely, near-reclusive child of Providence, Rhode Island, who felt intimations of mind-melting infinity in New England of the twenties and thirties. The coast north of Boston inspired him with Gothic ideas, which he dished out in stories long and short for pulp magazines, thrilling readers who visited his mythical sites like Arkham, Miskatonic University, and Innsmouth—a fictional universe terrorized by creatures like Cthulhu, the ocean monster so complexly described that he cannot be pictured. Lovecraft specialized in such things: colors of no color, minerals not found on earth, languages that can’t be pronounced, and of course an unreadable and uncaring universe, “formed in fright,” as Melville put it speculatively. 

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions K39: Roxy Coss Connects The "Disparate Parts" Of Life

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Coss_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, new music from saxophonist and composer Roxy Coss from her album "Disparate Parts," that offers glimpses through music into the different parts of her life and her various roles, including musician, teacher, and mother. We'll also hear new music from two other saxophonist-composers, Julieta Eugenio, from her recent debut album "Jump," and Immanuel Wilkins new tracks (not on either of his two albums) from a collection of different artists. Also we have new music from guitarist Quentin Angus, and from the Jazz All Stars from the second volume from them - - and a solo piano gem from Gerald Clayton from his latest album, "Bells On Sand."

promo included: promo-K39

Blue Dimensions G43: A Trinity Of "Presence"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Three recent albums all entitled "Presence," from Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, John Petrucelli, and Brad Whitely.

Evans_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we are surprised to note that three jazz albums entitled "Presence" have come out in 2018, and we've decided to draw music from all three of them - - one from pianist Orrin Evans & The Captain Black Big Band, some high-energy stuff recorded in concert at two jazz clubs in Philadelphia, one from pianist Brad Whitely, a strong studio recording, and another live one, a double album from saxophonist and composer John Petrucelli with lots of strings and a scallop shell used as an instrument as well. Three engaging and very different albums, all called "Presence," coming up in this hour of Blue Dimensions.

promo included: promo-G43

Feminine Fusion (Series)

Produced by WCNY

Most recent piece in this series:

S07 Ep05: Songs Touching Many Hearts, 10/1/2022

From WCNY | Part of the Feminine Fusion series | :00

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Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWFC: 2022-01:Leipzig Bach Festival – "Father and Son" (opening concert), 10/3/2022

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:58

Bachfest_er__ffnung_small Like father, like son – or so the saying goes. But how true does this hold for Johann Sebastian Bach and his son Carl Philipp Emanuel? The opening concert of the 2022 Leipzig Bach Festival presents cantatas and passions by the two composers, and while Johann Sebastian may be more famous today, Carl Philipp Emanuel was actually better known in his time. Andreas Reize, the new music director at St. Thomas Church, leads the St. Thomas boys' choir and the world-renowned Gewandhaus Orchestra in a performance that gives the audience a unique chance to hear what unites Bach father and son, but also what sets them apart.

High Country Celtic Radio (Series)

Produced by High Country Celtic Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

High Country Celtic Radio 235 - Cats & Dogs

From High Country Celtic Radio | Part of the High Country Celtic Radio series | 59:00

High-country-celtic-240x240_small This week on High Country Celtic Radio, Katie Marie and Joe put together an hour of music celebrating a recent torrential rainfall. We're calling this week's theme, "Cats & Dogs," because, well, you know, it was raining cats and dogs.

Our artists this week: Molly's Revenge With Moira Smiley, Liz Carroll & Jake Charron, Lily Gems & Eileen O' Driscoll, Joanie Madden, Kathryn Tickell, The Dogwatch Nautical Band, Beginish, Four Men & A Dog, Colcannon, Nuala Kennedy, Iarla Ó Lionáird, The Humours, and Sharon Shannon.

This week, our FairPlé score is 54

Celebrating the Birthday of Bucky Pizzarelli

From KCUR | Part of the 12th Street Jump Weekly series | 59:00

(Air Dates: December 31 - January 8) On this week's archive episode of 12th Street Jump, we celebrate the music of Bucky Pizzarelli with Bucky himself and his long time music partner Ed Laub. We'll play a game of "So, What's Your Question" with Ed and talk to Bucky about what gives him the blues.

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Public Radio's weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, 12th STREET JUMP celebrates America's original art form, live from one of its birthplaces, 12th Street in Kansas City. That is where Basie tickled and ivories and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues. Each week, host Ebony Fondren offers up a lively hour of topical sketch comedy and some great live jazz and blues from the 12th STREET JUMP band (musical director Joe Cartright, along with Tyrone Clark on bass and Arnold Young on drums) and vocalist David Basse. Special guests join the fun every week down at the 12th Street Jump.

Notes from the Jazz Underground #44 - Jazz in Chicago, 2019

From WDCB | Part of the Notes from the Jazz Underground series | 58:00

With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.

Nftju_logo_small_small With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.