%s1 / %s2

Playlist: 2018 Possible New Programs

Compiled By: KRPS

Caption: PRX default Playlist image
No text

The Pulse (Series)

Produced by WHYY

Most recent piece in this series:

520: Uncovering the Inner Workings of the Oceans, 12/1/2023

From WHYY | Part of the The Pulse series | 59:02

3000x3000_itunes_thepulse_1_small What comes to mind when you think of the ocean? Maybe a day at the beach — swimming in the waves, snorkeling through coral reefs, fishing, surfing, and sunsets that kiss the blue horizon. But Earth’s oceans are more than all of that; they’re our planet’s defining feature, its largest ecosystem, the original source of all life — and, according to physicist and oceanographer Helen Czerski, the engine that powers our planet. On this episode, we talk with Czerski about her new book, “The Blue Machine: How the Ocean Works,” and why she says the ocean is critical not only to our climate system, but to the big and small processes that sustain and shape life on Earth. She also helps us understand the many intricacies of the sea, from the reasons why it’s salty to how the Earth’s rotation affects its currents. We also hear stories about efforts to restore coral reefs using sound, and find out why scientists are looking for climate time capsules at the bottom of the ocean.

Climate One (Series)

Produced by Climate One

Most recent piece in this series:

The Year in Climate: 2023

From Climate One | Part of the Climate One series | :29

Climate-one-logobug-cmyk_small It’s been a year of weather extremes – again – and renewed hope about our climate future. On the heels of this year’s international climate conference held in the oil-rich Middle East, Climate One hosts Greg Dalton and Ariana Brocious review major climate stories of the year, both lows and highs.

This special episode features excerpts from some of Climate One’s most surprising, moving and compelling interviews of 2023, including conversations with luminaries Rev. Lennox Yearwood and Rebecca Solnit, White House Climate Advisor Ali Zaidi, climate activist Nalleli Cobo and U.S. Sen. Cory Booker. 

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Strawberry Moon (#1522)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

Awww_logo_color_square

Lethologica is the inability to remember a word or name. The term is related to the name of the river Lethe, also known as the River of Oblivion, which in Greek mythology caused those in Hades to to forget their life on earth.
If a suspect is at large, he is moving about freely. The term at large, which comes to us via French from Latin, refers not to size, but distance. The phrase by and large, meaning "generally" or "on the whole," derives from a nautical term that denotes a way to sail a ship by adjusting its course according to the direction of the wind. 
A Massachusetts listener shares her mishearing the name of the beloved character Mr. Green Jeans on the old "Captain Kangaroo" TV show. She was in college before she realized his name wasn't Mr. Cream Cheese.  
Frida in Marquette, Michigan, shares a proverb from her Finnish heritage that translates as "Until the food is ready, feed your guests with words." She also asks about pank, a term she often hears there in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. It means "to pack down," as in to pank down snow or pank down sugar in a cup. The origin of pank is uncertain, although it may derive from a combination of pack and spank. This term is also heard in parts of Pennsylvania and Upstate New York.
Quiz Guy John Chaneski has a brain teaser based on translations of names that Native American people gave to various lunar months. For example, since lupines tend to howl more at the moon in the middle of winter, what's the nickname for the full moon in January?
Paloma from Escondido, California, asks about how the hosts developed their attitudes toward language. We share some of those influences, which include,  in Martha's case, studying Ancient Greek for 12 years with a polyglot professor, and in Grant's, learning from colleagues in the American Dialect Society and being trained as a lexicographer.
A listener reports being puzzled by a phrase she heard from a woman for whom she'd done a small favor: Did you think you'd taken me to raise? Heard mainly in Kentucky and Ohio, this phrase is a joking suggestion that the person who has done the favor has assumed responsibility for the other's care and upbringing. Similarly, an unreasonable request for a favor might be denied with the phrase I ain't took you to raise!
Eleven-year-old Josiah from San Antonio, Texas, is looking for a single English word to describe a road that's largely free of traffic. 
Jill in Indianapolis, Indiana, wonders how to spell the one-syllable cheer that starts with Y. Is it yay or yea? Since the 1930s, yay has been used that way. The word yea is much older and used in formal texts to mean indeed. An example is in the Psalm that contains the verse Yea, though I walk through the Valley of the Shadow of Death. 
When Mary from Hanover, New Hampshire, was vacationing in Alaska, she picked up a term from the locals: sucker hole. It refers to a patch of sun peeking through the clouds, which leads  tourists to assume that the weather is going to clear up. The locals, however, know that a sucker hole will be there only briefly before the skies are overcast again.
Our discussion about cursive handwriting and whether it should be taught in schools brought a tremendous response from listeners. Overwhelmingly, they agreed that there are so many benefits to learning to write this way that it's well worth the time and effort to teach cursive writing to youngsters. 
Pam in New York City wonders if bidding someone farewell with Toodle-oo derives from the French for "see you soon," a tout a l'heure. 
Many so-called rules of grammar are actually just zombie rules. They're ill-advised attempts by 17th-century grammarians to make English syntax fit the orderly rules of Latin. 
David, a rideshare driver in Virginia Beach, Virginia, wonders about all the residential developments he sees with names containing the word quay. Usually pronounced KEE, quay is an old term for "wharf." The use of quay in these names may involve what Entrepreneur magazine dubbed newstalgia, or constructing something to feel old even though it's actually new, or fauxstalgia, a yearning for a time in the past, even though you never actually experienced it yourself.
A Texas caller says her West Virginia-born mother uses the word hornicaboogery to mean "germs" or "the creeping crud." Among the many such joking names for imaginary illnesses are gollywobbles, pantod on the rummit, can't-help-its, school bus cramps, collywobbles, and carlymarbles.
In response to our conversation about names we call grandparents, John Polk tweeted about a grandfather in his family named Uh-huh and a grandmother named Who-Who. 
This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

Ozark Highlands Radio (Series)

Produced by Ozark Highlands Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

OHR076: OHR Presents: Christmas!, 12/18/2023

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Joni_bishop_prx_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Christmas songs both traditional & rare, performed by an interesting array of folk musicians, recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Hosts Dave Smith & Mark Jones present these festive archival holiday recordings.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of his father, Country Music Hall of Fame legend Grandpa Jones reciting a poem called “The Christmas Guest.”  Aubry Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile the story of folk music royalty Jean Ritchie’s first family Christmas tree.

Musicians at the Ozark Folk Center State Park have been putting on Christmas music shows for over four decades.  As with most music performed at the park, the Christmas music represented here is not your normal collection of holiday standards.  You’ll hear a few songs that you know and love, as well as many others that you’ve likely never encountered before.  The eclectic range of musicians performing on this edition of Ozark Highlands Radio include Grandpa Jones, Randall Hylton, The Dowden Sisters, The Lonesome Cowboys, Joni Bishop, Bob Olivera, The Heritage Quartet, and more.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of his father, country music legend Grandpa Jones, reciting a poem called “The Christmas Guest,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Renowned folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode relates Jean Ritchie’s own childhood memories of an early Ritchie Family Christmas.

Earth Eats (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

EE 23-52: Winter holiday foods, 12/22/2023

From WFIU | Part of the Earth Eats series | 54:00

Ee_logo_small

“I love cookies. They’re hands-on, there’s a lot of technique involved in them,  they’re really fun and easy to do with kids,  they bake quickly,they’re perfect for gift giving any time of year, and they’re great."

Holidays and baking go hand in hand. Join us for a collection of favorite wintery stories for the holiday season with Earth Eats. We drop in on a cookie baking workshop with kids at a food pantry, we enjoy a hot cup of coffee on a chilly bike ride, and we toast up a batch of maple granola for holiday gift giving. 

All that, plus CHESTNUTS on this special episode of Earth Eats.


Folk Alley Weekly (Series)

Produced by WKSU

Most recent piece in this series:

Reveal Weekly (Series)

Produced by Reveal

Most recent piece in this series:

949: Hidden confessions of the Mormon church, 12/9/2023

From Reveal | Part of the Reveal Weekly series | :00

no audio file

With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes (Series)

Produced by With Good Reason

Most recent piece in this series:

Winning NIL (half)

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 29:00

Ed5f1284-2462-41cf-8b9e-5b97a9b81c54_vaughnpic-768x660_small

NIL sent shockwaves through college athletics when it was signed into law in 2021. Now student-athletes could earn money off of their name, image, and likeness. But there weren’t any guide-rails to help student-athletes navigate the new NIL landscape. Enter Kim Whitler. She co-wrote Athlete Brands: How to Benefit from Your Name, Image and Likeness. And: In 2020, Sha’Carri Richardson was barred from representing Team USA at the Tokyo Olympics because she tested positive for marajuana. Jo Morrison says there are many other elite athletes like Richardson who’ve had their reputations tarnished for taking banned substances that have little to no evidence of enhancing performance.

Planetary Radio (Series)

Produced by Mat Kaplan

Most recent piece in this series:

Subsurface granite on the Moon? The anatomy of a lunar hot spot

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Compton-belkovich-lro-240x240_small

A decades-old lunar mystery gets an update in this week's Planetary Radio. Matt Siegler from the Planetary Science Institute shares his team's surprising findings about the granite formation that might lie beneath Compton-Belkovich, a thorium-rich hot spot on the far side of the Moon. Then Bruce Betts, chief scientist of The Planetary Society, shares What's Up in the night sky.


Discover more at: https://www.planetary.org/planetary-radio/2023-subsurface-granite-on-the-moon

Living Planet 05/04/2018

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 30:00

LLiving Planet: Walk the Walk -

On the show this week: Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

Walk_to_walk_small

Living Planet: Walk the Walk

 

Climate protection is on the agenda at talks in Bonn. But back home, who's really taking action? We visit a budding environmental movement in Poland's coal heartland and find out how an oil pipeline has pitched environmentalists against the Canadian president. Plus, solar power in Kenya and a cool solution to LA's urban heat problem.

 

 

Katowice: A coal town that wants to go green

 

The upcoming COP24 climate summit will be held in Katowice, deep in Poland's industrial and coal mining heartland. Its air quality is among the worst in Europe. But the town is trying to clean up its act. And if Katowice can go green, perhaps anywhere can.

 

Canada's First Nations vs. tar sands pipeline

 

Canadian President Justin Trudeau has been vocal about his commitment to climate protection. But now, he's coming to blows with environmentalists and the provincial government of British Columbia over a massive oil pipeline

Can reflective roads help LA keep its cool?

Los Angeles has the greatest density of cars in the US — and a massive network of roads. In summer the asphalt absorbs sunlight and heats up, warming the air above it, an effect that will be exacerbated by climate change. But cool paving could change all that.

 

 

Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

Living Planet 11/17/23

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Living Planet: Environment Matters ~ from DW series | 29:59

61296882_7_small

REPORTS

Interview: 'Less war, less warming' w/Dr Patrick Bigger & Khem Rogaly

Portugal's wave energy - Lisa Louis

Tara Austin

From WDSE | Part of the Radio Gallery series | 04:40

This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm.

An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

Playing
Tara Austin
From
WDSE

Tara_austin_5_small This week painter Tara Austin opens her new body of work "Boreal Ornament" in the George Morrison Gallery at the Duluth Art Institute. Along with Jonathan Herrera, Austin welcomes the public the opening on Thursday, May 10, with a reception and gallery talk from 6 - 9pm. An MFA graduate from UW Madison, Minnesota native Austin brings the northland and Nordic traditions of rosemåling into her vibrant flora, patterned paintings. Listen for more about her process and inspirations and check her work on display at The Duluth Art Institute May 10-July 1.

ClassicalWorks (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

ClassicalWorks (Episode 182)

From WFIU | Part of the ClassicalWorks series | 59:00

Classicalworks_logo_-_luann_johnson_small ClassicalWorks (Episode 182)

Jazz with David Basse (Series)

Produced by Jazz with David Basse, LLC.

Most recent piece in this series:

1949.3: Jazz with David Basse 1949.3, 12/8/2023 2:00 AM

From Jazz with David Basse, LLC. | Part of the Jazz with David Basse series | 01:00:00

Thumbnail_2021_small 15 hours a week.

Open Source with Christopher Lydon (Series)

Produced by Open Source

Most recent piece in this series:

Time's Echo

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 51:09

Playing
Time's Echo
From
Open Source

Time_s_echo_small The question that resurfaces in a time of horror may be what remains when memory is wiped out, when the unspeakable is left unspoken, in someone’s hope, perhaps, that it’ll be forgotten? Where does history live? Jeremy Eichler’s answer is that music becomes the code of our darkest secrets.

Babi Yar is the ravine in Kyiv where Nazi invaders killed and dumped the bodies of more than 33,000 Jews in the last couple days of September 1941. It became an officially unmentionable disgrace to the Germans who executed the atrocity and to the Ukrainians and Russians who didn’t stop it. Almost 20 years later, and ever since then, Babi Yar got its standing as the biggest mass murder in the Nazi war on the Soviet Union, but only because Yevgeny Yevtushenko wrote a famous poem about it called “Babi Yar,” and Dmitri Shostakovich, in turn, defied Stalin to compose a Babi Yar memorial at the head of his thirteenth symphony.
There in one grim anecdote is how history lives inside music, music as a last refuge of history that we confront no other way. Jeremy Eichler’s irresistible new book from the ruins of the twentieth century is called Time’s Echo: The Second World War, the Holocaust, and the Music of Remembrance. It’s very particularly about four giants in twentieth-century music: Richard Strauss, Arnold Schoenberg, Dmitri Shostakovich, and Benjamin Britten. 

Blue Dimensions (Series)

Produced by Bluesnet Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

Blue Dimensions L49: Pianist Sullivan Fortner Is At The Top Of His "Solo Game"

From Bluesnet Radio | Part of the Blue Dimensions series | 59:00

Fortner_small In this hour of Blue Dimensions, we'll hear some solo piano work from a great pianist, Sullivan Fortner, who has a new album "Solo Game." The album was recorded with little planning and arranging in advance, and no second takes of any of the songs. We'll also hear from bassist and bandleader Mike Boone, whose album "Enjoying The View" includes a wonderful steelpan player, Victor Provost. We have new music from another bassist and band leader Arthur Kell and the Arthur Kell Speculation Quartet, plus Audrey Silver, a singer and player of the native American flute with a new album "Oklahoma," songs from the musical Oklahoma. We'll hear one of those that has long been a favorite of jazz artists — plus the latest albums from pianist Art Hirahara and saxophonist Jerry Bergonzi.

promo included: promo-L49

Feminine Fusion (Series)

Produced by WCNY

Most recent piece in this series:

S08 Ep15: Invitation to the Dance, 12/9/2023

From WCNY | Part of the Feminine Fusion series | :00

no audio file

Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts (Series)

Produced by DW - Deutsche Welle

Most recent piece in this series:

DWFC 2023 - 11: Beethoven Festival Finale, 12/11/2023

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the Deutsche Welle Festival Concerts series | 01:57:59

K67_230923_mahler_chamber_and_pekka_kusisto_c_daniel_dittus_fur_beethovenfest_bonn_12_small What's better than one magnificent chamber orchestra? Two, of course! The Mahler Chamber Orchestra (MCO) and the Chamber Orchestra of Europe (COE) are two world-renowned ensembles known for exciting repertoire and exceptional performances, and their appearances at the 2023 Beethoven Festival were no exception. In this Beethoven-packed show, we'll hear the MCO join with Finnish violinist and conductor Pekka Kuusisto to present a unique version of the composer's only violin concerto, while the COE delivers an energetic rendition of Beethoven's Symphony No. 7. Works by Hector Berlioz and the contemporary British composer Thomas Adès complete the program.

High Country Celtic Radio (Series)

Produced by High Country Celtic Radio

Most recent piece in this series:

High Country Celtic Radio 297 - Free For All

From High Country Celtic Radio | Part of the High Country Celtic Radio series | 59:00

High-country-celtic-240x240_small This week, Katie Marie and Joe put together a Free For All show, which means there's no theme this week--but we do have a bunch of brand new releases that we've been itching to get on the air, so you'll be hearing a couple of new selections from each of the new albums from Lúnasa piper, Cillian Vallely, & David Doocey, Quebecois trio Genticorum; Chieftains' lead singer, Kevin Conneff, & The Dublin Trio; Canadians Laura Risk, Nicholas Williams, & Rachel Aucoin; Scotland's Mànran; and Raelach Records artists Pádraic Keane, Aidan Connolly, Fergus McGorman & Ruairí McGorman.

We also feature these artists this week: Siobhan And Murty, Artisan Row, FullSet, Niamh Ní Charra, Brid O'Gorman with Eoin O'Neill, and Tara Breen & Pádraig Rynne.

Our FairPlé score this week: 47

Celebrating the Birthday of Bucky Pizzarelli

From KCUR | Part of the 12th Street Jump Weekly series | 59:00

(Air Dates: December 31 - January 8) On this week's archive episode of 12th Street Jump, we celebrate the music of Bucky Pizzarelli with Bucky himself and his long time music partner Ed Laub. We'll play a game of "So, What's Your Question" with Ed and talk to Bucky about what gives him the blues.

Bucky-pizzarelli-08_small

Public Radio's weekly jazz, blues and comedy jam, 12th STREET JUMP celebrates America's original art form, live from one of its birthplaces, 12th Street in Kansas City. That is where Basie tickled and ivories and Big Joe Turner shouted the blues. Each week, host Ebony Fondren offers up a lively hour of topical sketch comedy and some great live jazz and blues from the 12th STREET JUMP band (musical director Joe Cartright, along with Tyrone Clark on bass and Arnold Young on drums) and vocalist David Basse. Special guests join the fun every week down at the 12th Street Jump.

Notes from the Jazz Underground #44 - Jazz in Chicago, 2019

From WDCB | Part of the Notes from the Jazz Underground series | 58:00

With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.

Nftju_logo_small_small With all of the internationally lauded Jazz coming out of Chicago these days, Notes from the Jazz Underground takes a look - and a listen - to some of the shining stars of the Chicago Jazz scene.