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Playlist: Roland's Eclectic Audio

Compiled By: Roland Foster

 Credit:

Awesome Audio

The Gazillionth (or so) Monty Python Radio Special

From Joyride Media | 59:00

"It's"

Montypython_small THE GAZILLIONTH (OR SO) MONTY PYTHON RADIO SPECIAL A new one-hour Monty Python radio documentary hosted Keith Olbermann. Monty Python debuted on the BBC nearly 40 years ago, and their mix of everything absurd, obscure and English has inspired generations comedians - from the professionals to the amateur line-quoters. Their skits, films and songs continue to be both poignant and funny today, whether experienced for the first or gazillionth time on TV, film, disc (plastic or vinyl), broadway or anytime a devoted fan is confronted with a cheese shop, a dead parrott or a shrubbery. Between excerpts of their finest moments, Cast members Eric Idle, John Cleese and Terry Jones (with help from Python geek/historian Kim Howard Johnson) look back on the men, the myths, and legends behind them. Musician Mark Stewart analyzes the musical works that are equally as influential as their skits and films. Radio broadcasters Michael Berger and Jeff Prescott discuss Python's impact on concerned citizens of San Diego and the FCC. Carol Cleveland, a Python in everything but the title, adds what it's like to be a real woman. The Gazillionth (or so) Monty Python Radio Special is hosted by television and radio personality Keith Olbermann. He can currently be seen and heard injecting Monty Python references into his coverage of news, politics and sports on The Countdown with Keith Olbermann (MSNBC), The Dan Patrick Show (ESPN Radio) and Football Night in America (NBC-TV). Content advisories includes references to the human anatomy (bodyparts and ailments), ranging from clinical terminology from medical journals, textbooks and diagnoses, to English slang commonly featured in PBS broadcasts of classic BBC programs. Full transcripts, including song lyrics, can be provided on request.

Independent Minds: Peter Sellers

From Murray Street Productions | Part of the Independent Minds series | 55:31

Learn more about an amazing comic genius--Independent Minds: Peter Sellers is a one-hour (news-friendly) entertainment documentary hosted by David D'Arcy.

Sellers_small Peter Sellers' comic genius is undeniable. His radio, television, and film work has influenced everyone from the Monty Python troupe to Mike Myers. He gave movie audiences iconic characters like the laughingly wicked Dr. Strangelove, and the bumbling Inspector Clouseau. In the 1960s, his rise to stardom made him one of England's most recognizable stars, on par with the Beatles. Now, 40 years after the height of Peter Sellers' career, David D'Arcy hosts an engaging look at this comic genius. We'll hear from Sellers' collaborators Blake Edwards, Paul Mazursky and Joe McGrath, as well as Mike Myers, Tracy Ullman, John Lithgow, Geoffrey Rush, and Sellers biographers Ed Sikov and Roger Lewis. Plus rare archive interviews of Sellers! INDEPENDENT MINDS: PETER SELLERS is an hour-long special. ***Available 10/28 - 12/5 at NO CHARGE, but registration is required.

Bob Dylan, The Poet

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 58:59

(Rerun episode from 12/7/16) Bob Dylan, the poet, has been singing more than 50 years, but have you ever really stopped to listen to the words?

Screen_shot_2017-06-09_at_11

Bob Dylan, the poet, has been singing more than 50 years, but have you ever really stopped to listen to the words? Now that Dylan is a Nobel giant of literature, we asked Christopher Ricks, professor of English at Boston University, for a line-by-line, close-reading of a few lyrical wonders.

screen-shot-2016-12-07-at-1-20-22-pm

 First page of “Like A Rolling Stone” manuscript.

Listening to Dylan the poet, you hear many things: rural protest storyteller, Greenwich village freewheeler, king of rock surrealism. A people’s poet and songster (in the tradition of Robert Burns), a modernist beatnik (in the zone of Allen Ginsburg), a classic versifier (in the bardic tradition of Orpheus—that’s what Salman Rushdie says), and a prolific quoter and sampler (in the old, weird, American blues style, as Greil Marcus says). The novelist Francine Prose hears Arthur Rimbaud and Walt Whitman; the journalist Charlie Pierce hears gonzo journalism. Only Ricks would dare to compare Dylan to literary jumbos like Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, and Eliot.

Of course, Dylan is in a category of his own (not just because, unlike most writers, Dylan is heard through records, radio, and on stage); in fact, Ricks contends that Dylan the “greatest living user of the English language.”

dylantypewriter

Here are some of our favorite annotations from Ricks:

Desolation Row

They’re selling postcards of the hanging, they’re painting the passports brown,

The beauty parlor is filled with sailors, the circus is in town

Here comes the blind commissioner, they’ve got him in a trance

One hand is tied to the tight-rope walker, the other is in his pants

And the riot squad they’re restless, they need somewhere to go

As Lady and I look out tonight, from Desolation Row

Christopher Ricks: Hanging is lynching… Wouldn’t it have been wonderful if “selling postcards of the hanging” was only a surrealist sickness. No, no. It was the American way of life. It was quite central. So then you move into these things that aresurrealist, all right. “Painting the passports brown.” Oh, that’s “painting the town red.” And the town is going to turn up a moment later in the song. So you’ve got this strange feeling that you often have in a dream, that there’s a word just below the surface, there’s some sort of link, there are strange things floating one into the other. Is the “blind commissioner” a commissioner who is blind, or a commissioner for the blind? It’s blind partly because you’re visualizing things. Sound wonderfully visualizes.

The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll

Hattie Carroll was a maid in the kitchen

She was fifty-one years old and gave birth to ten children

Who carried the dishes and took out the garbage

And never sat once at the head of the table

And didn’t even talk to the people at the table

Who just cleaned up all the food from the table

And emptied the ashtrays on a whole other level

Got killed by a blow, lay slain by a cane

That sailed through the air and came down through the room

Doomed and determined to destroy all the gentle

And she never done nothing to William Zanzinger

And you who philosophize disgrace and criticize all fears

Take the rag away from your face

Now ain’t the time for your tears

Ricks: Cain, as the first killer, turns up in many of Dylan’s songs. So the question is, when you sing a word like “cane,” it’s identical in sound with C-A-I-N. And when you have “table,” “table,” “table”—are you near Abel? Maybe not. But it’s a little bit of a coincidence. You’ve got cane. “Slain by a cane” reminds you: That was the first killing ever. So that you’ve got the primal curse of mankind on it!

Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands

With your mercury mouth in the missionary times,

And your eyes like smoke and your prayers like rhymes,

And your silver cross, and your voice like chimes,

Oh, do they think could bury you?

With your pockets well protected at last,

And your streetcar visions which you place on the grass,

And your flesh like silk, and your face like glass,

Who could they get to carry you?

Sad-eyed lady of the lowlands,

Where the sad-eyed prophet says that no man comes,

My warehouse eyes, my Arabian drums,

Should I put them by your gate,

Or, sad-eyed lady, should I wait?

Ricks: This is like a huge, Petrarchan poem. It’s like four, six sonnets by Petrarch. Every one of which lists all the wonderful apparatus which surrounds a seductive woman. The seduction may be her very goodness, or it may be other things about her. The song overlaps terrifically with Swinburne’s poem “Dolores,” where Dolores is our lady of sorrows, “the sad-eyed lady of the lowlands.” … The refrain is a very great beauty with great dignity. It’s about “should I lead them by her gate? Or sad eyed lady, should I wait?” “Should I wait” is like Shakespeare’s sonnets, where the speaker in the sonnets is always saying “please, I’m perfectly happy to wait, happy to wait”—with a terrific edge of resentment—and this a song which understands resentment. That is, it’s not simply grateful to a woman who puts you through all of this with her this and her that, “with your, with your, with your…” Terrific song. Terrifying song, really.

dylan at the piano

 

If you want to learn more about Dylan’s time in Cambridge, read our own Zach Goldhammer’s piece on the ARTery.

 

Illustration: Susan Coyne; Photos: Ted Russell/Polaris, Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Bob Dylan: Listen To The Words

From Paul Ingles | 59:01

Another hour of Dylan's most literate work, hosted by Paul Ingles, to further mark his winning the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature.

Dylantypewriter_small Another hour of Dylan's most literate work, hosted by Paul Ingles, to further mark his winning the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature.

Songs:

Visions of Johanna

Senor

Masters of War

Hurricane

The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll

Mississippi

Desolation Row

Boots of Spanish Leather

Bob Dylan, The Poet

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 58:30

Bob Dylan has been singing more than 50 years. But have you ever really stopped to listen to the words?

Screen_shot_2016-12-09_at_2

Bob Dylan, the poet, has been singing more than 50 years, but have you ever really stopped to listen to the words? Now that Dylan is a Nobel giant of literature, we asked Christopher Ricks, professor of English at Boston University, for a line-by-line, close-reading of a few lyrical wonders.

screen-shot-2016-12-07-at-1-20-22-pm

 First page of “Like A Rolling Stone” manuscript.

Listening to Dylan the poet, you hear many things: rural protest storyteller, Greenwich village freewheeler, king of rock surrealism. A people’s poet and songster (in the tradition of Robert Burns), a modernist beatnik (in the zone of Allen Ginsburg), a classic versifier (in the bardic tradition of Orpheus—that’s what Salman Rushdie says), and a prolific quoter and sampler (in the old, weird, American blues style, as Greil Marcus says). The novelist Francine Prose hears Arthur Rimbaud and Walt Whitman; the journalist Charlie Pierce hears gonzo journalism. Only Ricks would dare to compare Dylan to literary jumbos like Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, and Eliot.

Of course, Dylan is in a category of his own (not just because, unlike most writers, Dylan is heard through records, radio, and on stage); in fact, Ricks contends that Dylan the “greatest living user of the English language.”

dylantypewriter

Here are some of our favorite annotations from Ricks:

Desolation Row

They’re selling postcards of the hanging, they’re painting the passports brown,

The beauty parlor is filled with sailors, the circus is in town

Here comes the blind commissioner, they’ve got him in a trance

One hand is tied to the tight-rope walker, the other is in his pants

And the riot squad they’re restless, they need somewhere to go

As Lady and I look out tonight, from Desolation Row

Christopher Ricks: Hanging is lynching… Wouldn’t it have been wonderful if “selling postcards of the hanging” was only a surrealist sickness. No, no. It was the American way of life. It was quite central. So then you move into these things that aresurrealist, all right. “Painting the passports brown.” Oh, that’s “painting the town red.” And the town is going to turn up a moment later in the song. So you’ve got this strange feeling that you often have in a dream, that there’s a word just below the surface, there’s some sort of link, there are strange things floating one into the other. Is the “blind commissioner” a commissioner who is blind, or a commissioner for the blind? It’s blind partly because you’re visualizing things. Sound wonderfully visualizes.

The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll

Hattie Carroll was a maid in the kitchen

She was fifty-one years old and gave birth to ten children

Who carried the dishes and took out the garbage

And never sat once at the head of the table

And didn’t even talk to the people at the table

Who just cleaned up all the food from the table

And emptied the ashtrays on a whole other level

Got killed by a blow, lay slain by a cane

That sailed through the air and came down through the room

Doomed and determined to destroy all the gentle

And she never done nothing to William Zanzinger

And you who philosophize disgrace and criticize all fears

Take the rag away from your face

Now ain’t the time for your tears

Ricks: Cain, as the first killer, turns up in many of Dylan’s songs. So the question is, when you sing a word like “cane,” it’s identical in sound with C-A-I-N. And when you have “table,” “table,” “table”—are you near Abel? Maybe not. But it’s a little bit of a coincidence. You’ve got cane. “Slain by a cane” reminds you: That was the first killing ever. So that you’ve got the primal curse of mankind on it!

Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands

With your mercury mouth in the missionary times,

And your eyes like smoke and your prayers like rhymes,

And your silver cross, and your voice like chimes,

Oh, do they think could bury you?

With your pockets well protected at last,

And your streetcar visions which you place on the grass,

And your flesh like silk, and your face like glass,

Who could they get to carry you?

 

Sad-eyed lady of the lowlands,

Where the sad-eyed prophet says that no man comes,

My warehouse eyes, my Arabian drums,

Should I put them by your gate,

Or, sad-eyed lady, should I wait?

Ricks: This is like a huge, Petrarchan poem. It’s like four, six sonnets by Petrarch. Every one of which lists all the wonderful apparatus which surrounds a seductive woman. The seduction may be her very goodness, or it may be other things about her. The song overlaps terrifically with Swinburne’s poem “Dolores,” where Dolores is our lady of sorrows, “the sad-eyed lady of the lowlands.” … The refrain is a very great beauty with great dignity. It’s about “should I lead them by her gate? Or sad eyed lady, should I wait?” “Should I wait” is like Shakespeare’s sonnets, where the speaker in the sonnets is always saying “please, I’m perfectly happy to wait, happy to wait”—with a terrific edge of resentment—and this a song which understands resentment. That is, it’s not simply grateful to a woman who puts you through all of this with her this and her that, “with your, with your, with your…” Terrific song. Terrifying song, really.

dylan at the piano

Roger Ebert in Conversation with Studs Terkel

From The WFMT Radio Network | 02:07:28

Roger Ebert, world renowned film critic, journalist, screen writer and social commentator passed away on April 4, 2013 at the age of 70.

The WFMT Radio Network is offering excerpts of Roger Ebert speaking with Studs Terkel from the Studs Terkel Radio Archive,to coincide with the release of "Life Itself," a a documentary based on Roger Ebert's early years

Primary_roger-red-seats_small For stations airing this program please announce that it comes from:
The Studs Terkel Radio Archive a collection of more than 5,000 interviews being curated by the WFMT Radio Network and the Chicago History Museum – www.studsterkel.org



Clip #1
. Roger Ebert the Movie Goer
Ebert reads a section of his book regarding the experience of movie goers as the films they watch become memories of their own lives.


Clip #2. Roger Ebert: Movies as Memories, Convincing Capone
Ebert and Terkel discuss movies as memories, the anti-hero, and gangster films. Together they read the story of how the writer of Scarface (Ben Hecht) convinced Capone’s men that the movie is not about Capone.

Clip #3. Rogert Ebert on Chaplin
Ebert and Studs discuss Charlie Chaplin, his brilliance and fame, and the universality of silent films.

Clip #4. Roger Ebert: W.C Fields
Ebert and Stud’s discuss W.C. Field’s changing popularity, insecurities, and disgust for babies. Together they read a story of Field’s spiking Baby Leroy’s bottle from Ebert’s text.

Clip #5. Roger Ebert: The Western

Ebert relays the often overlooked importance of Westerns in American Film and their international appreciation and fame. 

Clip #6. Roger Ebert: The Marx Brother and Casablanca
 Ebert tells the story of Warner Brother’s attempt to prevent the Marx Brothers from using “Casablanca” in their movie “Night in Casablanca” after Warner Brother’s big hit romance “Casablanca.”

Clip #7
. Roger Ebert: Fellini
Ebert and Studs discuss Fellini’s films, in particular Ebert’s favorite, La Dolce Vita, and Stud’s favorite, La Strada. Together they explore Fellini’s directorial decisions and style.

Also included are two unedited files which contain the entire conversation between Studs and Robert.

WHER: 1000 Beautiful Watts—The First All Girl Radio Station in the Nation—Part 1

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the Fugitive Waves series | 25:08

When Sam Phillips sold Elvis' contract in 1955 he used the money to start an all girl radio station in Memphis, TN. Set in a pink, plush studio in the nations's third Holiday Inn, it was a novelty—but not for long.

Ks_fugitivewavessm_small When Sam Phillips sold Elvis' contract in 1955 he used the money to start an all girl radio station in Memphis, TN. Set in a pink, plush studio in the nations' third Holiday Inn, it was a novelty—but not for long. He hired models, beauty queens, actresses, telephone operators. Some were young mothers who just needed a job. WHER was the first radio station to feature women as more than novelties and sidekicks. The WHER girls were broadcasting pioneers. From 1955 into the mid-1970s they ruled the airwaves with style, wit and imagination. "WHER was the embryo of the egg," said Sam Phillips. "We broke a barrier. There was nothing like it in the world."

WHER: 1000 Beautiful Watts—The First All Girl Radio Station in the Nation—Part 2

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the Fugitive Waves series | 25:27

An all-girl radio station in Memphis—set against the backdrop of the civil rights movement, the women's movement, Vietnam, and the death of Martin Luther King—the story of WHER continues following the women who pioneered in broadcasting as they head into one of the most dramatic and volatile times in the nation's history.

Ks_fugitivewavessm_small When Sam Phillips sold Elvis' contract in 1955 he used the money to start WHER, an all-girl radio station in Memphis, TN. In this episode we move from the pink plush studio in the Holiday Inn, with undies hanging on clotheslines in the lobby,  into the 1960s and a new studio in the Mid-City building, Memphis. Set against the backdrop of the civil rights movement, the women's movement, Vietnam, and the death of Martin Luther King—the story of WHER continues following the women who pioneered in broadcasting as they head into one of the most dramatic and volatile times in the nation's history. 

The Hustler Who Inspired the Beats

From With Good Reason | Part of the With Good Reason: Weekly Half Hour Long Episodes series | 28:59

Herbert Huncke's line "I'm beat, man" gave Jack Kerouac the label for a generation seeking spiritual sustenance and "kicks" in post-war America.

Herbert_huncke_small The author of a new book about Herbert Huncke says his unrepentant deviance caught the imagination of Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William S. Burroughs. Hilary Holladay writes that Huncke (rhymes with “junky”) often said, “I’m beat, man.” His line gave Kerouac the label for a generation seeking spiritual sustenance and “kicks” in post-war America. Also featured: During the late 1960s, poet Allen Ginsberg bought a farm in New York to serve as “a haven for comrades in distress.” Gordon Ball, who was the farm manager, has written a book about his experience, East Hill Farm: Seasons with Allen Ginsberg .

Martin Sheen: Father Activist

From AARP Radio | Part of the Prime Time Radio series | 59:54

Martin Sheen and My Father's Secret War...this week on Prime Time Radio.

Ptrmartinsheen_small He intervened in his son's life, because, he told AARP's Nancy Graham: When a life is at stake, and it's your child, you become fearless. Actor Martin Sheen talked at length with Graham for a profile in the July-August issue of AARP The Magazine where he discussed his son Charlie, and problems with drugs and fame that threatened to take Charlie's life. Then...Lucinda Franks grew up thinking her father was a complete failure. Then, the Pulitzer prize-winning journalist found a piece of WWII memorabilia that prompted her to engage her considerable investigative skills. Her nearly obsessive quest led to the discovery that far from being a failure, her dad was an unsung hero. She shares her story in My Fathers Secret War.

A Beautiful Symphony of Brotherhood: A Musical Journey in the Life of Martin Luther King, Jr.

From WQXR | 58:00

In this hour-long special from WQXR and WNYC, host Terrance McKnight interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work--and examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause.

Wqxr_logo_nofreq_small

Martin Luther King, Jr. grew up listening to and singing church songs, and saw gospel and folk music as natural tools to further the civil rights movement.

In this hour-long special from WQXR and WNYC, host Terrance McKnight interweaves musical examples with Dr. King's own speeches and sermons to illustrate the powerful place that music held in his work--and examines how the musical community responded to and participated in Dr. King's cause.

Terrance McKnight is WQXR's Evening Host. He came to WQXR from WNYC, which he joined in 2008. He brings to his position wide and varied musical experience that includes performance, teaching and radio broadcast. An accomplished pianist, McKnight was also a member of the Morehouse College faculty, where he taught music appreciation and applied piano.

Billy Bragg’s Guide to the Music of Dissent (rebroadcast)

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 59:00

We're ringing in the new year with a rerun of our conversation with Billy Bragg, a troubadour for British radicalism for more than thirty years as well as a democratic guitar-playing socialist with a steadfast commitment to fighting fascism, racism, and homophobia.

Screen_shot_2017-12-21_at_12

We're ringing in the new year with a rerun of our conversation with Billy Bragg, a troubadour for British radicalism for more than thirty years as well as a democratic guitar-playing socialist with a steadfast commitment to fighting fascism, racism, and homophobia.

He was the voice of the striking miners in the 80s—reminding us that there is power in a union, despite what Thatcher & Reagan might have told you.

In the 90s, he tapped into a well of forgotten American lyricism, singing and writing music for hundreds of unreleased Woody Guthrie songs, and reminding us that all those fascists were always bound to lose.  

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV714TBmLQU[/embed]

Today, Bragg, like the British Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and Bernie Sanders in the U.S. , stands out as a survivor—someone who carried the torch for socialist ideas and sentiments through the Clinton/Blair years and the long age of acquiescence. Theres's a new audience of young people carrying his ideas forward now, but with a different tune: hip-hop and grime are the soundtrack of today’s resistance—not white guys with guitars—but the sentiment remains the same. Their history, as well as their lyrics, rhymes with Bragg’s own.

 

[A playlist of our favorite Bragg songs, curated by Zach Goldhammer, Susan Coyne, Pat Tomaino, Becca DeGregorio, and Conor Gillies]

As an elder statesman for youthful rebellion, Bragg wants to remind us how this whole subculture began. In his new book, Roots, Radicals, and Rockers, Bragg brings us back to 1950s England, where a new form of music called skiffle helped invent the first generation of true teenagers in England.

In his story, it’s the working-class English kids who picked up guitars in the playground and started singing American blues songs—like Leadbelly’s “Rock Island Line”—and who kicked off a 60- year tradition of dissenting music in the Anglophone world. It was not political music per se, but it was the first rumblings of an anti-conformist rebellion in the UK.

We pick-up Bragg’s story with the first skiffle superstar, Lonnie Donegan,

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wI4nRD-DRpk[/embed]

That spirit of rebellion continued to echo through the British Invasion in the 60s, the first wave of punk in the late 70s, and of course, in Bragg's own thirty year career.

But today, Bragg says it's a new sound carrying this rebellious tradition forward. Now, Britain's music of dissent is being made by Grime artists, blending high-speed English rap with West Indian dancehall beats. These were the musicians who also formed an unlikely alliance with Jeremy Corbyn in the last election.

 

We'll be listening carefully and trying to figure out where this new musical momentum will carry us next. You can also keep listening  with us—there's a playlist of all the songs featured in this  week's show here.

[Lead illustration by Susan Coyne. Prints are available at coyneworks.com]

See a full transcript of this show on Medium.

99% Invisible #88- The Broadcast Clock

From Roman Mars | Part of the 99% Invisible (Director's Cut) series | 14:53

What makes public radio tick.

99invisible-logo-square-for_prx_medium_small

There’s a term that epitomizes what we radio producers aspire to create: the “driveway moment.” It’s when a story is so good that you can’t leave your car. Inside of a driveway moment, time becomes elastic–you could be staring straight at a clock for the entire duration of the story, but for that length of time, the clock has no power over you.

But ironically,  inside the machinery of public radio–the industry that creates driveway moments–the clock rules all.

monikacalc

At NPR’s studios in Washington, DC, there are clocks everywhere. Big red digital clocks, huge round analog clocks. There’s even special software and time calculators, where 60 + 60 = 2’00.

(All Things Considered director Monika Evstatieva during a live broadcast in NPR’s Studio 2A. Credit: Julia Barton)

Each show has a ‘clock’, a set template, from which the show almost never varies. Every show that broadcasts—or aspires to broadcast—in the public radio system has a clock. This is the All Things Considered broadcast clock, which NPR and stations across the country refer to on a daily basis:

new_atcformat_3_8_04-2

It’s actually a pretty cool piece of visual design, but one which functions best when it is never seen. This template is used twice every weekday: ATC Hour 1, from 4:00:00pm through 4:59:59pm ET; and then for ATC Hour 2, from 5:00:00 through 5:59:59pm ET.

Here’s how it works: at the ‘top’ of the hour, there is a 59 second “billboard,” which announces what’s going up in the program. Then there’s five minutes for the newscast, which is itself divided into two segments (“Newscast I” and “Newscast II”). Then there are the “blocks”–A, B, C, and D–which is where the stories and interviews (or “two-ways”) live.

Segments can’t run long by even a second, because most of the local stations are automated to cut off the national program where the clock says they can. These times–the dividers between the sections on the clock–are called posts. You have to hit the post. Nothing can go wrong.

Though, of course, things go wrong every day.

Monika2

(When Julia visited ATC, a live interview segment accidentally got wrapped up 35 seconds early. Then it was on Monika, the director, to figure out what to do. Credit: Julia Barton)

Taking care of the clock is so ingrained in the director’s psyche that a common side effect of the job is waking up in the middle of the night fearing that you’ve blown the post–these are called “director’s dreams.” To cope with the anxiety, ATC directors make their own cheat sheets to help them memorize every queue of every hour of broadcast.Visit any studio that does a regular live feed with a broadcast clock and you’ll likely find a cheat sheet one somewhere in the studio.

TOTN sheet

The director’s cheat sheets at ATC  have been used so much that they’re in tatters. They have since been laminated.

ATC sheet

(Note the correction in the “Top Cast” in the upper right. It’s not “1:00″, it’s “:59″)

When NPR began in the early 1970s, show clocks were much less regimented–or they didn’t have clocks at all.

One of the early champions against the fixed clock was Bill Siemering, a founder of NPR who helped design the network’s overall sound. He came up with the name All Things

Considered (original title: A Daily Identifiable Product). Siemering wrote the mission statement of NPR, which is enshrined in the halls of NPR (note the text on the walls).

600x401x428543-Acoustical_panels_front_the_reception_desk_.jpg.pagespeed.ic.E0VR1u8FBN

 

(Credit: Interior Design)

Siemering liked a clock that was more free-form, because it allowed for spontaneity and unpredictability. But spontaneous and unpredictable does not always make for compelling radio. Done wrong, and you wind up with laughably bad “Schweddy Balls”-grade public radio.

 

When Siemering left NPR in the early 1970s, NPR chose to have more subdivided clocks. The constraints forced the shows to get tighter, which some say makes NPR stronger. One person is Neal Conan, former host of Talk of the Nation, who maintains that the earlier, freer days of NPR were not as halcyon as some may remember them.

 These days, podcasting allows for shows such as this one to be free of a post, and go on for as long or short as is fitting for any given story.

me clock with 99

Reporter-producer-editor (triple threat!) Julia Barton visited NPR’s old headquarters at Washington, DC, where she spoke with ATC directors Monika Evstatieva and Greg Dixon, and former Talk of the Nation host Neal Conan. Julia also spoke with public radio’s patron saint, Bill Siemering.

Many thanks to All Things Considered Executive Producer Chris Turpin and the other powers-that-be at NPR who gave us unfettered access to the shop during Julia’s visit.

(Note: Julia visited NPR while they were still at 635 Massachusetts Ave, NW. They have since moved to 1111 N. Capitol St.)

More network clocks! And more! And more!

Music: ”Io, Apollo, And The Veil”- Metavari, ”The Wind Up Bird”- Tunng, ”Standard Error”- Orcas, ”Paintchart”- ISAN, ”Snow Tip Cap Mountain”- The Octopus Project, ”Black Blizzard/Red Umbrella”- The Octopus Project

Pete Seeger: Plain and Complicated

From WFHB | Part of the Interchange series | 01:28:26

Pete Seeger died in 2014 at the age of 94, a cultural icon, and a so-called a “consensus hero." But the hero was also a pariah too many.

Seeger’s was a long life of constant work and activism. He is for many the quintessential “folk singer” and his left politics goes hand in hand with that reputation. And it is because of those politics that Seeger has perhaps been as widely vilified as praised.

Pete-seeger_small


Today on Independence Day, your independent, community radio station in Bloomington, Indiana presents “Pete Seeger: Plain and Complicated.”

It’s hard to know where to begin but let’s start with one of the most popular songs of the mid-20th century, The Weavers rendition of “Goodnight Irene” by Huddie Ledbetter, better known as Leadbelly. This is a song which seems a kind of simple artifact of pop music, but how we understand the tradition of folk songs which are nearly always “covers” or appropriations of music often borne of deep suffering is deeply complicated. That’s for you to chew though as that particular critique is beyond the scope of this program.

Pete Seeger died in 2014 at the age of 94, a cultural icon, and a so-called a “consensus hero”–but the hero was once also a pariah.

Seeger’s was a long life of constant work and activism. He is for many the quintessential “folk singer” and his left politics goes hand in hand with that reputation. And it is because of those politics that Seeger has perhaps been as widely vilified as praised. I am tempted to offer a sketch of this life at the outset, but even a sketch would take up too much of our program and our guests will cover some of this territory for us.

And those GUESTS are, in this order:

  • Ron Cohen, co-editor of The Pete Seeger Reader
  • Rob Rosenthal, co-editor, along with his son, Sam, of Pete Seeger: In His Own Words
  • Leda Schubert, author of a new children’s book about Seeger called Listen: How Pete Seeger Got America Singing
  • Robbie Lieberman, author of My Song Is My Weapon
  • Ernie Lieberman, a singer-songwriter who played now and again with Pete Seeger and produced a landmark album of songs for peace in 1954 called Goodbye, Mr. War
  • Gary Fine, author of Sticky Reputations: The Politics of Collective Memory in Midcentury America.

I enlist the first guest you’ll hear, Ron Cohen, as something like a co-host for the program. Ron stressed that Pete Seeger was a supreme organizer, from rallies, to music journals, to newsletters, to hootenannies, to anti-war protests, to festivals, to river clean-up–an inexhaustible Organizer. So let’s let Ron Cohen organize this show about Pete Seeger, the great organizer–he’ll keep us “up to date” with a kind of activity log of Pete’s life as we move through conversations with our other Pete Seeger experts. Throughout you’ll hear me reading from a four of Pete’s letters published in Ron and Sam Rosenthal’s Pete Seeger: In His Own Words–I have taken liberties with these and compressed them. I don’t feel the elisions alter the meaning of the text, but feel free to check up on me!

MUSIC
“Goodnight Irene” by The Weavers
“Which Side Are You On” by The Almanac Singers
“Talking Union” by The Almanac Singers
“Ballad of October 16” by The Almanac Singers
“Tzena, Tzena, Tzena” by The Weavers
“This Old Man” performed by Pete Seeger
“Where Have All the Flowers Gone?”
“My Dirty Stream” by Pete Seeger
“The People Are Scratching” performed by Pete Seeger
“Little Boxes” performed by Pete Seeger
“Mr. War” by Ernie Lieberman
“Spring Song” by Ernie Lieberman
“Waist Deep In the Big Muddy” by Pete Seeger
“We Shall Overcome” performed by Pete Seeger

CREDITS
Producer & Host: Doug Storm
Assistant Producer: Rob Schoon
Executive Producer: Joe Crawford

Pete Seeger and Studs Terkel

From The WFMT Radio Network | 01:04:39

Studs Terkel interviews Pete Seeger on the culture of folk music. Includes one hour interview and 7 breakout segments from the interview by Studs Terkel at WFMT/Chicago in 1955.

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Hour long

The segments are:

Clip 1: Pete Seeger talking with Studs Terkel – 1955 – Intro

Clip 2: Pete Seeger and Studs Terkel on how folk songs come from specific, real events

Clip 3: Pete Seeger and Studs Terkel on the folk revival

Clip 4: Pete Seeger and Studs Terkel on singing for kids

Clip 5: Pete Seeger and Studs Terkel on Woody Guthrie

Clip 6: Pete Seeger and Studs Terkel on people making their own music and “The Goofing off Suite” / Bach

Clip 7: Pete Seeger and Studs Terkel discussing and playing a closing lullaby “All the Pretty Little Horses”

Pete Seeger – Thoughts from a Troubadour: An Interview with Pete Seeger

From Barry Vogel | 28:59

This archive edition of Radio Curious was originally recorded and broadcast in January of 1992 when Radio Curious was called “Government, Politics and Ideas.” Our guest is Pete Seeger, a folk musician and a very special person in the lives of many people around the world. He brings songs of hope, peace, justice and equality wherever he goes. He was an inspiration to me when I first learned to play the 5-string banjo and when I took lessons from him, in what seems both long and ago and, just yesterday. We began our conversation when I asked him what he meant when he said “the world is in a state of uncertainty.

Default-piece-image-2 This archive edition of Radio Curious was originally recorded and broadcast in January of 1992 when Radio Curious was called “Government, Politics and Ideas.” Our guest is Pete Seeger, a folk musician and a very special person in the lives of many people around the world. He brings songs of hope, peace, justice and equality wherever he goes. He was an inspiration to me when I first learned to play the 5-string banjo and when I took lessons from him, in what seems both long and ago and, just yesterday. We began our conversation when I asked him what he meant when he said “the world is in a state of uncertainty.

Pete Seeger-All Mixed Up

From Peter Bochan | Part of the All Mixed Up series | 59:18

Tribute to legendary singer-songwriter, political activist and environmentalist Pete Seeger featuring interviews, music and stories from a life far-traveled and well lived. Studs Terkel, Harry Belafonte, Bruce Springsteen, Bob Dylan, Woody Guthrie and Pete himself act as our narrators.

Pete_seeger_b_w_small Featuring the Almanac Singers, the Weavers, Woody Guthrie, Harry Belafonte, Bob Dylan, Studs Terkel, Richie Havens, Stephen Colbert, Bruce Springsteen, The Freedom Singers, various children's chorus, plus interviews, live performances from Carnegie Hall, Newport, and Clearwater Music Festivals, stories, songs and clips from the extraordinary life of Pete Seeger.

I was lucky enough to work at several Clearwater Festivals and got to interview and broadcast Pete over WBAI during Father's Day Weekends and treasure every moment and memory shared with one of the founding Fathers of Folk music.

The Protest Singer: An Intimate Portrait of Pete Seeger

From Media Mechanics | 53:59

An exclusive interview with Pete Seeger, who turns 90 in May. (May 3rd) Program is relatively undated, referencing that Pete turns 90 "this year." Free to stations.

Pete-seeger-1_small Celebrate the 90th birthday of American icon Pete Seeger Sunday, May 3rd, with this hour-long special. In a brand new exclusive interview, Pete discusses his career, the view from 90, how music can still change the world, and his new book The Protest Singer. The book's author, The New Yorker's Alec Wilkinson, offers insights into the remarkable career of this national treasure - a man who took on red-baiters, racists, war-mongers, and polluters. There's plenty of 
music, too. Hosted by Rita Houston. Program is undated such that it can run well after May 3rd.

This is expected to be Pete Seeger's only radio interview in support of the book. Air window opens Friday, May 1.



Quite Early Morning: The Life, Times and Legacy of Pete Seeger

From A World of Possibilities | 54:58

Legendary folksinger and social activist Pete Seeger is receiving long-delayed appreciation for his immense contribution to American music and culture. In this intimate conversation, Pete recalls it all through the prism of mellowed memory, his personal reflections on his life, times and his country's future laced with the sounds of his now-quavering but still strong voice.

Peteseeger_small

Legendary folksinger and social activist Pete Seeger is receiving long-delayed appreciation for his immense contribution to American music and culture. In this intimate conversation, Pete recalls it all through the prism of mellowed memory, his personal reflections on his life, times and his country's future laced with the sounds of his now-quavering but still strong voice.

Guest: 
Pete Seeger, Folksinger, social activist, American Icon  

Thelonious Monk at 100

From Open Source | Part of the Open Source with Christopher Lydon series | 58:59

At Thelonious Monk’s hundredth birthday, it’s our ears that have changed, not his sound.

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At Thelonious Monk’s hundredth birthday, it’s our ears that have changed, not his sound.  Instead of odd angles and eccentricity we hear orchids in music, various and beautiful.  The truth of the man’s life is clearer, too: drawn back from the ragged edge to the creative center of classically American music.  

The quirky story of Thelonious Sphere Monk made a new sort of sense in Robin Kelley’ grand biography in 2009.  Monk was one of the be-bop revolutionaries, it’s always said, uptown in Manhattan in 1941, but Robin Kelley revealed him as a child of Fats Waller stride piano and all the music of 1930s Harlem and well beyond it.

 

He mumbled at the piano and danced around it. He showed up late sometimes, sometimes disappeared, and did time for small drug offenses. But inside Robin Kelley’s biography is an unshakably original, purposeful musician, ever a generous genius, an attentive father, son, and husband, in triumph and in trouble. 

What Monk did was take the oldest, rooted tradition of the piano, in Harlem, New York, all over the country. And then he combined it with a future we have yet to achieve. It’s collapsing space and time. And his whole approach to the piano is one that brings past and present and future together in one. And he had never ever left his roots as a stride pianist — all the way to the very last tune he ever played.

Monk wrote close to a hundred songs still being interpreted and reinvented. He was musician beyond category, or genre, or period, in Kelly’s persuasive account. It’s fun to see Monk now an African-American Emersonian. His line, for instance, that “the piano ain’t got no wrong notes,” resonates with Ralph Waldo Emerson’s war on conformity and consistency. “To believe your own sound,” paraphrasing Emerson’s line in Self Reliance, “that is genius.”  

Robin D. G. Kelley in conversation with Chris Lydon, December 18, 2009

Soul Jazz Part 1

From WUCF | Part of the Jazz and the American Spirit series | 59:00

Jeff Rupert examines the earthy, funky, bluesy sound of Soul Jazz. To illustrate the genre, Jeff brings along Donald Byrd, Harold Mabern, Les McCann, Eddie Harris and Horace Silver.

Playing
Soul Jazz Part 1
From
WUCF

Jazz-am-spirit-logo_small Jazz and the American Spirit examines the great stories of Jazz across America by looking at and listening to the musicians who have created it. Hosted by saxophonist and University of Central Florida Director of Jazz Studies Jeff Rupert.

Soul Jazz Part 2

From WUCF | Part of the Jazz and the American Spirit series | 59:00

Jeff Rupert continues his survey of Soul Jazz, the music that combines Rhythm and Blues and Jazz music.

Playing
Soul Jazz Part 2
From
WUCF

Jatas_small Jazz and the American Spirit examines the great stories of Jazz across America by looking at and listening to the musicians who have created it. Hosted by saxophonist and University of Central Florida Director of Jazz Studies Jeff Rupert.

1959, It Was A Very Good Year, Part 1

From WUCF | Part of the Jazz and the American Spirit series | 59:00

In 1959 the Dodgers won the World Series, Dwight Eisenhower is President, Rod Serlings Twilight Zone premiers on TV and it was a very good year for Jazz! Jeff Rupert takes a look at the incredible jazz year of 1959 in part one of “1959, It Was A Very Good Year” on Jazz and the American Spirit.

Jatas_small Jazz and the American Spirit examines the great stories of Jazz across America by looking at and listening to the musicians who have created it. Hosted by saxophonist and University of Central Florida Director of Jazz Studies Jeff Rupert.