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Playlist: May Screening 2012

Compiled By: Emily Corwin

Caption: PRX default Playlist image
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Bobby Hutcherson: Master of the vibes

From KALW | 14:07

For nearly 50 years now, a jazz artist who now resides in Northern California has enjoyed a career as one of the great performers on the vibraphone, commonly called the vibes. At 71 and diminished by respiratory illness, Bobby Hutcherson is still playing the vibes and indisputably will always be a force in creative jazz.

2946_small For nearly 50 years now, a jazz artist who now resides in Northern California has enjoyed a career as one of the great performers on the vibraphone, commonly called the vibes. At 71 and diminished by respiratory illness, Bobby Hutcherson is still playing the vibes and indisputably will always be a force in creative jazz.

The cost of recycling scavengers

From KALW | 04:46

San Francisco is considered a national leader in pro-environmental policy, advocacy, and education. And while the City is a pioneer in recycling it may be getting tougher on street recyclers who scavenge from blue bins throughout the city. San Francisco Supervisor Christina Olague requested a hearing looking into how much money the City is losing because of scavengers, as well as ways to prevent the practice. That investigation could begin next month. Street recycling is a growing underground economy. And it is illegal. Ben Trefny has the story.

Default-piece-image-1 San Francisco is considered a national leader in pro-environmental policy, advocacy, and education. And while the City is a pioneer in recycling it may be getting tougher on street recyclers who scavenge from blue bins throughout the city. San Francisco Supervisor Christina Olague requested a hearing looking into how much money the City is losing because of scavengers, as well as ways to prevent the practice. That investigation could begin next month. Street recycling is a growing underground economy. And it is illegal. Ben Trefny has the story.

Bowling alley acts like community center in Daly City

From KALW | 07:08

The neighborhood of Westborough straddles the border between Daly City and South San Francisco. It’s a mostly residential area, with quiet sloping streets full of brown and beige town homes built in the 50s and 60s. Perched at the top of a hill on King Drive, is a plaza contains a dental building, an Asian supermarket, two nail salons, Chinese and Filipino restaurants, and a kind of community center you might not expect: the biggest, most partying bowling alley in Northern California.

Default-piece-image-1 The neighborhood of Westborough straddles the border between Daly City and South San Francisco. It’s a mostly residential area, with quiet sloping streets full of brown and beige town homes built in the 50s and 60s. Perched at the top of a hill on King Drive, is a plaza contains a dental building, an Asian supermarket, two nail salons, Chinese and Filipino restaurants, and a kind of community center you might not expect: the biggest, most partying bowling alley in Northern California.

How gas prices make California one of the reddest states in the country

From KALW | 12:26

If you want know the price of gas around the United States, there’s a map online that breaks it down for you. The states with the cheapest gas are green, and the states with the most expensive are red. It’s probably the only map where California is one of the reddest states in the country. People are blaming the threat of war in Iran and election year politics for the most recent hike in gas prices, but KALW's Julie Caine wanted to know why Californians always seem to pay more.

Default-piece-image-2 If you want know the price of gas around the United States, there’s a map online that breaks it down for you. The states with the cheapest gas are green, and the states with the most expensive are red. It’s probably the only map where California is one of the reddest states in the country. People are blaming the threat of war in Iran and election year politics for the most recent hike in gas prices, but KALW's Julie Caine wanted to know why Californians always seem to pay more.