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Playlist: Friday Rotators

Compiled By: WRIR

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Then I'll Be Free To Travel Home-the Legacy of the New York African Burial Ground (Series)

Produced by ERIC V. TAIT, JR.

Most recent piece in this series:

Episode 1. "Then I'll Be Free To Travel Home"

From ERIC V. TAIT, JR. | Part of the Then I'll Be Free To Travel Home-the Legacy of the New York African Burial Ground series | 59:00

Family_small Traces the historical arc of the long African-American battle against northern slavery and for full, first-class citizenship. It chronicles the contributions the original Africans who founded the New York African Burial ground - and their descendants - made to the survival and development of New York and the nation from the 1600s to the New York City Draft Riots of 1863. It is also a history of larger-than-life "freedom fighters" on many levels and of many races, who challenged slavery to change the course of this nation from it's earliest Colonial days. This is that story as it unfolded primarily on the eastern part of what would eventually become the United States of America.

Rivers That Were (Series)

Produced by Barbara Bernstein

Most recent piece in this series:

Beaver Taught Salmon How To Jump (Part Two)

From Barbara Bernstein | Part of the Rivers That Were series | 54:31

Rivers_that_were_small_small Beaver Taught Salmon How to Jump , Part Two of Rivers That Were , recreates the once natural and free-flowing tributaries and mainstem of the Columbia River, the Great River of the West. The river that was is contrasted with today's industrialized landscape of culverted urban creeks, hardened riverbanks and inundated waterfalls and rapids.

Intelligence Squared U.S. (Series)

Produced by Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Most recent piece in this series:

Is Affirmative Action Unfair to Asian Americans?

From Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates | Part of the Intelligence Squared U.S. series | 54:00

Affirmativeaction800x_small An affirmative action battle is again playing out at the highest levels, only this time with Asian Americans at the center of the controversy. At the heart of the matter is the question of whether the Supreme Court should reconsider race in college admissions. The group, Students for Fair Admissions, has taken aim at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, alleging that Asian Americans are less likely to be admitted than comparably qualified white, Black, or Latino applicants. In two separate cases, the group claims that 1.) Harvard’s admissions policy is regressive and discriminates against Asian Americans, and 2.) UNC – which is a public institution and therefore covered by the 14th amendment’s equal protection guarantee – violates both Title VI and the Constitution with its use of race in admissions. But opponents say race-conscious decision making is a necessary tool to address longstanding racism and discrimination. As such, in this timely debate, we ask the question of whether affirmative action is indeed unfair to Asian Americans.  

Arguing “yes” is Lee Cheng, co-founder of the Asian American Coalition for Education 

Arguing “no is John Yang, president and executive director of Asian Americans Advancing Justice 

2015 Re:sound Specials, from the Third Coast Audio Festival (Series)

Produced by Third Coast International Audio Festival

Most recent piece in this series:

Re:sound - The Tight Spaces Show

From Third Coast International Audio Festival | Part of the 2015 Re:sound Specials, from the Third Coast Audio Festival series | 59:00

Alex_eflon_small

This hour we look and the ups and downs of confinement. 

Picture A Box

by Nate DiMeo (The Memory Palace, 2012)
Sometimes the only way to get out of a tight space is by getting into an even tighter one. Henry Brown did just that when he sealed himself in a very tight space. 

Tunnel 57
by Roman Mars & Daniel Gross (99% Invisible, 2014)
In 1961, East Germany closed its border to West Berlin with a wall. But this isn’t a story about the the Berlin Wall. This is a story about how to get through it — or really, underneath it.

Elbow Room
by Elizabeth Arnold (Stories From The Heart Of The Land, 2007)
Alaska, China and Mongolia ~ How much land does a person need? Elizabeth Arnold, who lives in Alaska, goes in search of even more wide-open space—and ends up with a case of claustrophobia in Outer Mongolia.

The Isolation Solitude Confinement Happiness Freedom Domain
by Jon Tjhia and written by Toby Fehily (Radiotonic from ABCRN & Paper Radio)
A day spa isn't the first place you'd expect to find a think tank. And yet beyond the spray tans and skin needling, the head massages and body sugaring, Toby Fehily finds himself stripping off and stepping into a darkened capsule filled with warm, salty water. With the lid tightly shut, Toby merges into the purest blackness, coming to his senses via the most senseless route possible.