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Playlist: Austin Film Festival's On Story®'s Portfolio

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1847: Lawrence Wright & Twin Peaks' Mark Frost, 11/22/2018

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 54:00

This week on On Story we’ll hear Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright on his new book God Save Texas and the Hulu mini-series he adapted from his 2006 book The Looming Tower. And later, we’ll hear from Twin Peaks co-creator Mark Frost on the cult television series return to air after 25 years.

Larry_wrightstandardquotecard_small This week on On Story we’ll hear Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright on his new book God Save Texas and the Hulu mini-series he adapted from his 2006 book The Looming Tower. And later, we’ll hear from Twin Peaks co-creator Mark Frost on the cult television series return to air after 25 years. 

Multi-talented scribe Lawrence Wright has told stories as an author, screenwriter, playwright and journalist. Last month Wright released his highly anticipated new novel God Save Texas, which explores the history, culture, and politics of ‘the most controversial state in America’.  I interviewed Wright on the day of the books release at an event cosponsored by Austin Film Festival and The Texas Book Festival.

In 2006 Wright released the Pultizer Prize-winning novel, The Looming Tower - which explored the events that led to the September 11th terrorist attacks. Earlier this year Wright teamed with his frequent documentarian collaborator Alex Gibney and filmmaker Dan Futterman to adapt the novel into a Hulu miniseries of the same name. The show stars Jeff Daniels, Peter Sarsgaard, and Michael Stulhbarg. Clips of The Looming Tower courtesy of Legendary Television & Hulu. 

Mark Frost started his career as a staff writer on the celebrated 80’s police procedural Hill Street Blues. In 1990, Frost partnered with filmmaker David Lynch to co-create the television series, Twin Peaks. The shows mix of melodrama, surrealism, offbeat humor and horror was quickly celebrated for being unlike anything else on network television. In 2017, the series returned to air 25 years after its initial run for an 18 episode limited series on the Showtime network. I spoke with Mark Frost about revisiting old creations at the 24th annual Austin Film Festival in 2017. Clips of Twin Peaks (1990) courtesy of Lynch/Frost Productions, Inc., American Broadcasting Company (ABC).

We’re back with Twin Peaks co-creator Mark Frost. When we left off, Frost was discussing how 25 years of reflection led to the cult television series’ return to the air. Frost co-created Twin Peaks with award-winning filmmaker David Lynch. Known for his surrealist visuals and non-linear narratives, Lynch’s feature films include Blue Velvet, Mulholland Drive, and Eraserhead.

 

 

1848: 25th Anniversary Classics: Rudy & Philadelphia, 11/29/2018

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 54:00

This week, in honor of celebrating Austin Film Festival’s 25th Anniversary we’re going back into our archives to bring you conversations with writers that created two of 1993’s most remembered films. First we’ll hear from screenwriter Angelo Pizzo who wrote the inspirational football drama Rudy. And later, we’ll hear from Ron Nyswaner who wrote the Jonathan Demme directed drama Philadelphia, which starred Denzel Washington and Tom Hanks.

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This week, in honor of Austin Film Festival’s 25th Anniversary we’re going back into our archives to bring you conversations with two writers that released cultural milestones in 1993. First we’ll hear from screenwriter Angelo Pizzo who wrote the inspirational football drama Rudy. And later, we’ll hear from Ron Nyswaner who wrote the Jonathan Demme directed drama Philadelphia, which starred Denzel Washington and Tom Hanks.

This is On Story from Austin Film Festival and PRI, I’m your host Barbara Morgan. 1993 saw the release of giant blockbuster films like Jurassic Park, classic comedies like Groundhog’s Day, Rom-Com staples like Sleepless in Seattle, and the inspirational true-life story of an undersized, dyslexic student who’s only dream was to play football for the University of Notre Dame. Rudy, written by Angelo Pizzo, has stood the test of time as a film that still resonates with an audience 25 years after its release. In 2005 the film was named one of the 25 Best Sports Movies by ESPN and one of the most-inspiring films of all time by the “AFI 100 Series”. Pizzo, who also wrote the Indiana basketball drama Hoosiers, spoke about Rudy at the 22nd Austin Film Festival in 2015. Clips of Rudy courtesy of TriStar Pictures, Inc.

We continue our 25-year look back with a conversation with screenwriter Ron Nyswaner. In 1993, Nyswaner wrote Philadelphia, which follows an attorney who is fired from his high-powered law firm after it’s revealed that he is HIV positive. The film was one of the first mainstream Hollywood films to acknowledge HIV and homosexuality. Tom Hanks won an Academy Award® for Best actor for his portrayal of lawyer Andrew Beckett. Nyswaner is also known for adapting the W. Somerset Maugham novel The Painted Veil into the 2006 film of the same name.  Nyswaner spoke about his career and writing process at the 20th annual Austin Film Festival in 2013. Clips of Philadelphia courtesy of TriStar Pictures, Inc. Clip of Ray Donovan courtesy of Showtime Networks, Inc. Clip of The Painted Veil courtesy of Bob Yari Productions & Yari Film Group Releasing.

1849: Filmmaker Faraday Okoro & The Writers Journey Christopher Vogler, 12/6/2018

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 53:56

On this week’s On Story we’ll hear from filmmaker Faraday Okoro, a two-time Austin Film Festival alumni and featured in Moviemaker Magazine’s Screenwriter to Watch List. His first feature film Nigerian Prince was produced for $1 million as part of AT&T’s Untold Stories initiative. And later, we’ll hear from author Christopher Vogler, whose landmark book The Writers Journey has helped countless screenwriters shape their scripts by using the writings of mythologist Joseph Campbell.

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On this week’s On Story we’ll hear from filmmaker Faraday Okoro, a two-time Austin Film Festival alumni and featured in Moviemaker Magazine’s Screenwriter to Watch List. His first feature film Nigerian Prince was produced for $1 million as part of AT&T’s Untold Stories initiative. And later, we’ll hear from author Christopher Vogler, whose landmark book The Writers Journey has helped countless screenwriters shape their scripts by using the writings of mythologist Joseph Campbell.

31-year-old writer/director Faraday Okoro is a rising talent. Okoro’s first two shorts, Full-Windsor and Blitz screened at several major film festivals including Austin Film Festival and internationally. Okoro’s new film Nigerian Prince premiered at the 2018 Tribecca Film Festival. The film is a coming of age, heist thriller that explores the hidden world of Nigerian email scammers. I recently spoke with Okoro about the learning process behind making his first feature and the thematic elements that tie his work together.

Christopher Vogler is a veteran Hollywood story consultant and author who is best known for his landmark book The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Storytellers. Vogler’s book looked at the writings of mythologist Joseph Campbell and explored the universal narrative structures and character archetypes that all stories follow. As a story consultant for various studios, Vogler worked on The Lion King, Aladdin and Hercules, Fight Club, and The Wrestler. Professor Greg Garrett spoke with Christopher Vogler at the 24th Austin Film Festival in 2017.

 

1902: A Quiet Place + The Original Disney Princess Linda Woolverton, 1/10/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 54:00

This week on On Story we’ll hear from screenwriting duo Scott Beck and Bryan Woods on how the classic silent films of Charlie Chaplin and Jacques Tati and the board game Monopoly inspired 2018’s biggest horror hit A Quiet Place. Later we’ll hear from Veteran screenwriter Linda Woolverton who is responsible for writing some of Disney’s most beloved films; Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King, and Maleficent.

Scott_beck_quote_card_large_small This week on On Story we’ll hear from screenwriting duo Scott Beck and Bryan Woods on how the classic silent films of Charlie Chaplin and Jacques Tati and the board game Monopoly inspired 2018’s biggest horror hit A Quiet Place. Later we’ll hear from Veteran screenwriter Linda Woolverton who is responsible for writing some of Disney’s most beloved films; Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King, and Maleficent.

Filmmakers Scott Beck and Bryan Woods first met as sixth-graders in their hometown of Bettendorf, Iowa. The two quickly began a creative collaboration that continues today.  Most recently the pair wrote the screenplay for A Quiet Place. The film stars Emily Blunt and John Krasinski as a husband and wife who are forced to raise a family in a post apocalyptic world surrounded by monsters who hunt anything that makes a noise.  The horror film was one of 2018’s biggest hits – it received critical acclaim and grossed over $300 million. Filmmaker Christopher Boone spoke with Beck and Woods about writing the genre script at the 25th Annual Austin Film Festival in 2018. Clips of A Quiet Place courtesy of Paramount Pictures Corporation.

Writer Linda Woolverton has built a career on telling family friendly stories. In 1991 she wrote her first animated feature, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. The film won a Golden Globe and became the first animated film to be nominated for Best Picture at the Academy Awards®. She continued her success with Disney by contributing to the scripts for The Lion King, Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey and Mulan. More recently, Woolverton wrote the screenplays for Tim Burton’s live-action Alice in Wonderland and 2014’s Maleficent which starred Angelina Jolie. Story Bar Founder Erin Hallagan spoke with Linda Woolverton at the 25th Annual Austin Film Festival in 2018. Clips of Beauty and the Beast (1991) courtesy of the Walt Disney Company. Clips of Alice in Wonderland (2010) & Maleficent courtesy of Disney Enterprises, Inc.

1903: HBO's Barry + Great Adaptations, 1/17/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 54:00

This week, we’ll hear from television creator Alec Berg. Berg’s television credits include writing and executive producing Seinfeld, Curb Your Enthusiasm and Barry, whose second season is set to premiere this year. Later, screenwriters that have successfully adapted books and other works for the big and small screen will discuss the challenges of capturing the spirit of the source material.

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Alec Berg has written for some of television’s most acclaimed comedies including Seinfeld, Curb Your Enthusiasm, and Silicon Valley. He co-created the new HBO show Barry with former SNL star Bill Hader. The series follows Barry, played by Hadder, who is a depressed, low-level hit man looking for a way out. I recently spoke with Berg over the phone to discuss using research to help develop a story, avoiding clichés, and the evolution television comedies. Clips of Barry courtesy of HBO.

Next we’ll hear from three screenwriters who have tackled the difficult task of adaptation. Sarah Gubbins co-created the Amazon series I Love Dick which was based on the 1997 novel of the same name, Marc Haimes wrote the 2016 animated film Kubo and the Two Strings and is currently working on adapting the graphic novel Nimona and the best selling novel The Girl Who Drank the Moon, and Eric Heisserer who adapted the novella The Story of Your Life into the 2016 Oscar Nominated film Arrival. Gubbins, Haimes, and Heisserer spoke with me at the 24th Austin Film Festival to discuss translating themes and literary devices, collaborating with authors, and when to take creative liberties. Clips of Arrival courtesy of Xenolinguistics, LLC. and Clips of I Love Dick courtesy of Amazon Studios and Topple Productions.

1903: HBO's Barry + Great Adaptations, 1/17/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 54:00

This week, we’ll hear from television creator Alec Berg. Berg’s television credits include writing and executive producing Seinfeld, Curb Your Enthusiasm and Barry, whose second season is set to premiere this year. Later, screenwriters that have successfully adapted books and other works for the big and small screen will discuss the challenges of capturing the spirit of the source material.

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Alec Berg has written for some of television’s most acclaimed comedies including Seinfeld, Curb Your Enthusiasm, and Silicon Valley. He co-created the new HBO show Barry with former SNL star Bill Hader. The series follows Barry, played by Hadder, who is a depressed, low-level hit man looking for a way out. I recently spoke with Berg over the phone to discuss using research to help develop a story, avoiding clichés, and the evolution television comedies. Clips of Barry courtesy of HBO.

Next we’ll hear from three screenwriters who have tackled the difficult task of adaptation. Sarah Gubbins co-created the Amazon series I Love Dick which was based on the 1997 novel of the same name, Marc Haimes wrote the 2016 animated film Kubo and the Two Strings and is currently working on adapting the graphic novel Nimona and the best selling novel The Girl Who Drank the Moon, and Eric Heisserer who adapted the novella The Story of Your Life into the 2016 Oscar Nominated film Arrival. Gubbins, Haimes, and Heisserer spoke with me at the 24th Austin Film Festival to discuss translating themes and literary devices, collaborating with authors, and when to take creative liberties. Clips of Arrival courtesy of Xenolinguistics, LLC. and Clips of I Love Dick courtesy of Amazon Studios and Topple Productions.

1904: The Americans Executive Producer, Graham Yost + Friends from College , 1/24/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 53:58

This week on On Story we’ll hear from writer, producer, and showrunner Graham Yost. Yost has been behind 90's action hits Speed and Broken Arrow, World War II epics Band of Brothers and The Pacific, and the suspenseful TV dramas Justified and the recent Golden Globe winning FX series The Americans. And later we’ll hear from husband and wife creators Francesca Delbanco and Nicholas Stoller on the second season of their Netflix comedy series Friends from College which stars Fred Savage, Keegan-Michael Key, and Cobie Smulders.

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In the 1990’s he wrote the Keanu Reeves and Sandra Bullock action hit Speed. He followed the success of that film by writing a string of action hits that included Broken Arrow, and The Last Castle. In the 2000’s Yost returned to television writing two installments of the Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning World War II series Band of Brothers and the Emmy Award winning follow up The Pacific. Most recently Yost was the showrunner of the Emmy winning FX series Justified, the Executive Producer on the Golden Globe winning series The Americans, and showrunner of the Amazon series Sneaky Pete which was co-created by actor Bryan Cranston. Clips of Justified courtesy of Sony Pictures Television Inc. & Bluebush Productions, LLC. Clips of Justified courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox Corporation. 

Netflix’s original series Friends from College follows six Harvard alums living New York City in their 40s and the complicated relationships they have with each other. The series was created by husband and wife team Francesca Delbanco and Nicholas Stoller. Stoller is known for writing and directing comedy films Forgetting Sarah Marshall, Neighbors, and Get Him to the Greek. The pair spoke about creating the comedy series after the Season 2 premiere at the 25 Annual Austin Film Festival. Clips and trailers of Friends from College courtesy of Netflix, Inc.

 

1906: Insecure Co-creator, Larry Wilmore, 2/7/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 53:58

On this week’s On Story, Emmy Award® winning television producer, actor, comedian and writer Larry Wilmore discusses the creation of the influential Bernie Mac Show and his recent collaboration with Issa Rae creating HBO’s Insecure.

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On this week’s On Story, Emmy Award® winning television producer, actor, comedian and writer Larry Wilmore discusses the creation of the influential Bernie Mac Show and his recent collaboration with Issa Rae creating HBO’s Insecure.

Larry Wilmore has been an actor, comedian, producer, and writer for more than 25 years. Wilmore’s credits include writing for In Living Color, The Fresh Prince of Bel Air, and The Office. In 2001 Wilmore created for comedian Bernie Mac. The series ran for five seasons and earned Wilmore an Emmy Award and Peabody. Wilmore was a writer for Fox’s groundbreaking In Living Color and created The Bernie Mac Show. In 2016, Wilmore co-created HBO’s Insecure with writer and actress Issa Rae. The comedy series was recently renewed for a fourth season. Wilmore spoke about his career with actor John Merriman in front of a live audience at the Austin Film Festival’s Writers Conference.

 

Clip of Bernie Mac courtesy of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Clip of The Original Kings of Comedy courtesy of Paramount Pictures Corporation
Clip of The PJ’s courtesy of Touchstone Pictures & Television, a.a.d.o Disney Enterprises, Inc.
Clip of An Evening at the Improv courtesy of A&E Network & TeleAmerica Entertainment, Inc.
Clip of Insecure courtesy of Home Box Office, Inc. & Issa Rae Productions, Inc.

 

 

1907: Deconstructing Jane Austen, 2/14/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 54:00

On this week’s special On Story Valentine’s Day episode, the filmmakers behind Sense and Sensibility, The Jane Austen Book Club, The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, and What Jane Saw discuss how they adapted these beloved novels for various storytelling mediums, and why they think Jane Austen’s themes and stories remain so beloved and powerful today.

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With six novels that produced over sixty adaptations for the screen, the talents of Jane Austen have lived on long past her time on earth. On this episode, the filmmakers behind Sense and Sensibility, The Jane Austen Book Club, and YouTube’s web series The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, as well as the academic behind the interactive website What Jane Saw dot org discuss how Jane Austen’s themes and stories remain so beloved and powerful today.

Producer and studio executive Lindsay Doran has worked in the movie business for more than 30 years as a studio executive and producer. Her numerous credits on film and television include The Firm, Stranger Than Fiction and the Sense and Sensibility which earned Emma Thompson an Academy Award® for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Screenwriter, director and producer Robin Swicord wrote the screenplays for such classics as Little Women, Memoirs of a Geisha and The Jane Austen Book Club which she also directed.

Janine Barchas is a Professor of English at the University of Texas at Austin and the author of Matters of Fact in Jane Austen: History, Location, and Celebrity. She’s also the creator behind the digital heritage project “What Jane Saw” (www dot whatjanesaw dot org) and most recently, she co-curated the exhibition “Will & Jane: Shakespeare, Austen, and the Cult of Celebrity,” at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC. 

Bernie Su is the two-time Emmy Award-winning producer and creator behind YouTube’s web series The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, Emma Approved and Vanity. Barbara Morgan spoke with this distinguished panel at the 23rd Austin Film Festival in 2016.

1909: Iconic Actresses: America Ferrera & June Squibb, 2/28/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 54:00

On this week’s On Story we’ll hear from How to Train Your Dragon actress and producer America Ferrera and later, theatre film and television actress June Squibb discusses her work in film and on television.

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America Ferrera is best known for her work on the ABC comedy-drama, Ugly Betty. The role garnered her a Golden Globe, a Screen Actors Guild Award and the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding lead Actress in a Comedy Series. America Ferrera’s numerous film credits include Real Women Have Curves, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, End of Watch and How to Train Your Dragon. America Ferrera returned to television in 2015 as a regular and co-producer on the NBC comedy, Superstore. Marcie Mayhorn spoke with America Ferrera in 2012 at the 19th Austin Film Festival.

Actress June Squibb got her start in musical theatre in the 1950’s. She made her Broadway debut as Electra in the original 1960 production of Gypsy starring Ethel Merman. June Squibb made her transition to film in the late 1980’s with Woody Allen’s Alice and went on to roles in Scent of a Woman, The Age of Innocence, Meet Joe Black, and Far From Heaven. She’s since worked twice with director Alexander Payne, first on the film About Schmidt, and later, co-starring with Bruce Dern in Nebraska, which earned her the Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Her recent credits include the critically acclaimed film I’ll See You in my Dreams with Rhea Pearlman, Mary Kay Place and Sam Elliot as well as television appearances in Getting On, Girls, Glee, The Big bang Theory and Modern Family. June Squibb spoke with journalist Jane Sumner at the 22nd Austin Film Festival in 2015.

 

1910: Wild Wild Country, 3/7/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 53:57

This week on On Story we’ll hear from documentary storytellers Chapman and Maclain Way on their Emmy award winning Netflix documentary Wild Wild Country. The six part series tells the true story of a controversial Indian guru and his attempt to build a utopian city deep in rural Oregon in the 1980’s.

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This week on On Story we’ll hear from documentary storytellers Chapman and Maclain Way on their Emmy award winning Netflix documentary Wild Wild Country. The six part series tells the true story of a controversial Indian guru and his attempt to build a utopian city deep in rural Oregon in the 1980’s.

Wild Wild Country
explores the true story of an Indian guru who attempted to build a Utopian community on a ranch in rural Oregon in the 1980’s and the impeding conflict that resulted with the locals. The series was created by documentary filmmakers Chapman and Maclain Way and went on to be nominated for 5 Emmys including a win for Outstanding Documentary Series. Journalist Michael MacCambridge interviewed the Way brothers at the 25th annual Austin Film Festival.

Clips of Wild Wild Country courtesy of Duplass Brothers Productions & Netflix, Inc. 

1911: Writing Fiction Podcasts + Misha Green, 3/14/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 54:00

This week on On Story, we’ll hear from podcast pioneers on breaking into a new medium and adapting audio stories for television. And later, we’ll hear from rising television talent, Misha Green, on her work co-creating the critically acclaimed, genre-bending drama Underground.

Mishagreen_quotecardlarge_small This week on On Story, we’ll hear from podcast pioneers on breaking into a new medium and adapting audio stories for television. And later, we’ll hear from rising television talent, Misha Green, on her work co-creating the critically acclaimed, genre-bending drama Underground.

Narrative fiction podcasts have updated the radio drama with a modern, streamable twist. This new medium has attracted storytellers who, until recently, never considered telling strictly audio stories. Writers Lauren Shippen and Jenny Turner Hall discussed their transition into podcasting and the new opportunities that their shows have provided them at the 2017 Austin Film Festival.

Misha Green began her career as a staff writer on FX’s hit drama Sons of Anarchy and NBC’s cult sci fi series, Heroes. Green later went on to co-create Undergound, which chronicled a group of Georgia slaves who escaped bondage to find freedom via the Underground Railroad. The series broke ratings records for the WGN network and was nominated for several awards. Misha Green spoke with filmmaker Ya’ke Smith at the 2017 Austin Film Festival. 

Clips of Underground courtesy of: Safehouse Pictures, Get Lifted Film Company Sony Pictures Television, Safehouse Pictures

1912: Writing Horror, 3/21/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 54:00

On this week’s episode of On Story, It co-writer, Chase Palmer discusses adapting the Stephen King novel of the same name. Later, we'll hear from horror legend Wes Craven and Texas Chainsaw Massacre’s Tobe Hooper on writing for horror and scare tactics.

Tobehooperquotecardlarge_small On this week’s episode of On Story, It co-writer, Chase Palmer discusses adapting the Stephen King novel of the same name. Later, we'll hear from horror legend Wes Craven and Texas Chainsaw Massacre’s Tobe Hooper on writing for horror and scare tactics. 

Chase Palmer is a filmmaker and the co-writer of the upcoming supernatural horror film It, based on Stephen King’s 1986 novel of the same name. Palmer premiered his first short film, Neo-Noir at Austin Film Festival in 2002. He went on to win the screenplay competition in 2003 for this script, Buried Underground and then came back to the festival in 2004 to screen his next short, Shock and Awe.

Film director, screenwriter and producer Tobe Hooper is best known for this work in the horror film genre. His most recognized films include The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, Poltergeist and Salem’s Lot to name a few.  Hooper died of natural causes last month at the age of 74. He attended Austin Film Festival in 1996, 1997 and again in 2002. In 2013, Hooper’s final directorial effort, Djinn was released.

Wes Craven was a film director, writer, producer and actor known for his pioneering work in the genre of horror films, particularly slasher films where his impact on the genre coined him the “Master of Horror.” Craven created the A Nightmare on Elm Street franchise featuring the Freddy Krueger character, directing the first installment. Craven also directed all four films in the Scream series and the two films in the Hills Have Eyes series. Some of his other films include: The Last House on the Left, The Serpent and the Rainbow, The People Under the Stairs, and Red Eye.

Hooper and Craven’s panel discussion comes from the Austin Film Festival vault dating back to the 3rd year of the festival in 1996. 

Clips of A Nightmare on Elm Street courtesy New Line Productions, Inc.

Clips of It courtesy of Warner Brothers Pictures.





 

 

1913: Writing in the Past & Deconstructing Nora Ephron, 3/28/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 53:56

On this week’s On Story we’ll speak with the writers behind Mad Men, Westworld, and 11.22.63 to explore audiences fascination with film and television set in the past and the challenges writers face when tasked with telling stories set in a different time. We’ll also hear from some of today’s top romantic comedy writers on the lasting influence of filmmaker Nora Ephron.

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On this week’s On Story we’ll speak with the writers behind Mad Men, Westworld, and 11.22.63 to explore audiences fascination with film and television set in the past and the challenges writers face when tasked with telling stories set in a different time. We’ll also hear from some of today’s top romantic comedy writers on the lasting influence of filmmaker Nora Ephron.

From Lawrence of Arabia to The Crown, audiences have always been intrigued by stories set in the past. But what considerations do writers have to make when telling a story in a different time and what liberties can they take when they are writing about real events or real people? Screenwriter Alvarao Rodriguez spoke with 11.22.63 creator Bridget Carpenter and Mad Men writer Carly Wray to discuss research, authenticity, and the dangers of nostalgia. Both Carpenter and Wray worked on the HBO series Westworld which takes place in a science fiction amusement park that is set in the Wild West. Wray also wrote for Netflix’s Mindhunter which follows the early days of criminal profiling at the FBI and is set in 1977.

Sleepless in Seattle. When Harry Met Sally. You've Got Mail. Julie & Julia. It’s undeniable that Nora Ephron was one of the greatest romantic comedy writer/directors Hollywood has ever seen. Professor Greg Garrett spoke with Man Up writer Tess Morris and (500) Days of Summer writer Scott Neustadter to discuss how Ephron’s films continue to entertain audiences and how her writing has influenced their own work.

Clips of Westworld courtesy of Home Box Office (HBO), Warner Brothers Television, and Bad Robot

Clips of 11.22.63 courtesy of Warner Brothers Entertainment

Clips of Mad Men courtesy of Lionsgate Television & American Movie Classics (AMC)

Clips of Silkwood courtesy of American Broadcasting Companies, Inc. 

Clips of Sleepless in Seattle courtesy of TriStar Pictures, Inc 

Clips of Julie & Julia courtesy of Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc

Clips of When Harry Met Sally courtesy of Castle Rock Entertainment

Clips of You've Got Mail courtesy of Warner Brothers, a division of Time Warner Entertainment Company, LP

1913: Writing in the Past & Deconstructing Nora Ephron, 3/28/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 53:56

On this week’s On Story we’ll speak with the writers behind Mad Men, Westworld, and 11.22.63 to explore audiences fascination with film and television set in the past and the challenges writers face when tasked with telling stories set in a different time. We’ll also hear from some of today’s top romantic comedy writers on the lasting influence of filmmaker Nora Ephron.

Deconstructing_nora_ephron_quote_card_large_small

On this week’s On Story we’ll speak with the writers behind Mad Men, Westworld, and 11.22.63 to explore audiences fascination with film and television set in the past and the challenges writers face when tasked with telling stories set in a different time. We’ll also hear from some of today’s top romantic comedy writers on the lasting influence of filmmaker Nora Ephron.

From Lawrence of Arabia to The Crown, audiences have always been intrigued by stories set in the past. But what considerations do writers have to make when telling a story in a different time and what liberties can they take when they are writing about real events or real people? Screenwriter Alvarao Rodriguez spoke with 11.22.63 creator Bridget Carpenter and Mad Men writer Carly Wray to discuss research, authenticity, and the dangers of nostalgia. Both Carpenter and Wray worked on the HBO series Westworld which takes place in a science fiction amusement park that is set in the Wild West. Wray also wrote for Netflix’s Mindhunter which follows the early days of criminal profiling at the FBI and is set in 1977.

Sleepless in Seattle. When Harry Met Sally. You've Got Mail. Julie & Julia. It’s undeniable that Nora Ephron was one of the greatest romantic comedy writer/directors Hollywood has ever seen. Professor Greg Garrett spoke with Man Up writer Tess Morris and (500) Days of Summer writer Scott Neustadter to discuss how Ephron’s films continue to entertain audiences and how her writing has influenced their own work.

Clips of Westworld courtesy of Home Box Office (HBO), Warner Brothers Television, and Bad Robot

Clips of 11.22.63 courtesy of Warner Brothers Entertainment

Clips of Mad Men courtesy of Lionsgate Television & American Movie Classics (AMC)

Clips of Silkwood courtesy of American Broadcasting Companies, Inc. 

Clips of Sleepless in Seattle courtesy of TriStar Pictures, Inc 

Clips of Julie & Julia courtesy of Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc

Clips of When Harry Met Sally courtesy of Castle Rock Entertainment

Clips of You've Got Mail courtesy of Warner Brothers, a division of Time Warner Entertainment Company, LP

1915: Avengers: A Conversation with Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely, 4/11/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 53:57

On this week’s On Story we’ll hear from Avengers: Infinity War and End Game writers Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely. The two will discuss the daunting process and high expectations behind writing the final two Avengers installments and the misconception that superhero films are written for 13-year-old boys.

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On this week’s On Story we’ll hear from Avengers: Infinity War and End Game writers Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely.  The two will discuss the daunting process and high expectations behind writing the final two Avengers installments and the misconception that superhero films are written for 13-year-old boys.

The two started their careers by writing 2004’s The Life and Death of Peter Sellers. Their introduction to the Marvel universe was 2011’s Captain America: The First Avenger.  They went on to write the two following films in the Captain America series; Winter Soldier and Civil War before being tasked with writing Avengers: Infinity War and the upcoming Avengers: End Game. I spoke with Markus and McFeely about the collaborative nature of the Marvel Universe and the pressures behind writing the most anticipated movie of the decade. 

Clips of Captain America: The Winter Soldier courtesy of MVL Film Finance, LLC

Clips of Avengers: Infinity War courtesy of MVL Film Finance, LLC

 

Clips of Iron Man courtesy of MVL Film Finance, LLC.

1916: Author Lawrence Wright & Twin Peaks' Mark Frost , 4/18/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 54:00

This week on On Story we’ll hear Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright on his book God Save Texas and the Hulu mini-series he adapted from his 2006 book The Looming Tower. And later, we’ll hear from Twin Peaks co-creator Mark Frost on the cult television series return to air after 25 years.

Larrywrightquotecardlarge_small This week on On Story we’ll hear Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright on his book God Save Texas and the Hulu mini-series he adapted from his 2006 book The Looming Tower. And later, we’ll hear from Twin Peaks co-creator Mark Frost on the cult television series return to air after 25 years. 

Multi-talented scribe Lawrence Wright has told stories as an author, screenwriter, playwright and journalist. Last month Wright released his highly anticipated new novel God Save Texas, which explores the history, culture, and politics of ‘the most controversial state in America’. In 2006, Wright released the Pultizer Prize-winning novel, The Looming Tower - which explored the events that led to the September 11th terrorist attacks. Wright teamed with his frequent documentarian collaborator Alex Gibney and filmmaker Dan Futterman to adapt the novel into a Hulu miniseries of the same name. The show stars Jeff Daniels, Peter Sarsgaard, and Michael Stulhbarg. I interviewed Wright on the day of the books release at an event cosponsored by Austin Film Festival and The Texas Book Festival.

 

Mark Frost started his career as a staff writer on the celebrated 80’s police procedural Hill Street Blues. In 1990, Frost partnered with filmmaker David Lynch to co-create the television series, Twin Peaks. The shows mix of melodrama, surrealism, offbeat humor and horror was quickly celebrated for being unlike anything else on network television. In 2017, the series returned to air 25 years after its initial run for an 18 episode limited series on the Showtime network. I spoke with Mark Frost about revisiting old creations at the 24th annual Austin Film Festival in 2017.

Clips of The Looming Tower courtesy of Legendary Television &Hulu

Clips of Twin Peaks (1990) courtesy of Lynch/Frost Productions, Inc., American Broadcasting Company (ABC)

1932: Television Comedy with Greg Daniels & Alan Yang, 8/8/2019

From Austin Film Festival's On Story® | Part of the Austin Film Festival's On Story® series | 53:56

This week, Emmy-award winning writers Greg Daniels and Alan Yang look back on their respective journeys writing some of television’s greatest comedies. Daniels reflects on his writing career ranging from Saturday Night Live, to adapting the American version of The Office and co-creating Parks and Recreation. Master of None co-creator Alan Yang then discusses writing naturalistic comedy culled from personal experience, crafting cultural commentary, and the importance of representation in the media.

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Greg Daniels began writing for the National Lampoon at Harvard University with fellow writer Conan O’Brien. His first television engagement was with the hit HBO show Not Necessarily the News, which soon became Saturday Night Live, where he won his first Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing in a Variety Series. 

Daniels continued his career by joining The Simpsons as a writer and producer and after a long, successful stint on the show, moved onto co-create King of the Hill with Mike Judge. 

In 2005, Daniels went on to adapt The Office for American television and served as the show’s executive producer and showrunner. He then co-created and executive produced Parks and Recreation with Michael Schur in 2009. Daniels is the recipient of five Primetime Emmy awards.

Greg Daniels spoke with Kelly Williams at the 15th annual Austin Film Festival in 2008. Clips in this episode copyright: Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation, Sony Pictures Television, National Broadcasting Company, Inc.

Alan Yang is the co-creator and executive producer of the Netflix series Master of None, for which he received the 2016 Emmy Award for Best Writing in a Comedy Series. The show was nominated for four Emmys, including Best Comedy Series, and was the recipient of a Peabody Award, an AFI Award, and the Critics' Choice Award for Best Comedy. Previously, Yang was a writer and co-executive producer for Parks and Recreation, for which he was nominated for an Emmy in 2015. 

Alan Yang spoke with John Merriman at a 2017 Austin Film Festival Year-Round Event. Clips in this episode copyright: Netflix, 3 Arts Entertainment, Universal Television, Fremulon, National Broadcasting Company Inc., Deedle-Dee Productions.