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Playlist: Linnaea Melcarek's Portfolio

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National Writers Series: Murray Howe

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

This broadcast from the National Writers Series features doctor and author Murray Howe, son of hockey legend Gordie Howe.

Murrayhowe__1__small This broadcast from the National Writers Series features doctor and author Murray Howe, son of hockey legend Gordie Howe. Murray Howe's book is called "Nine Lessons I Learned from My Father." He talks this hour with WTCM NewsTalk 580 host Ron Jolly. Program produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Daniel Bergner

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:29

An program featuring journalist and author Daniel Bergner, whose latest book is "Sing For Your Life."

Danielbergner_small Daniel Bergner is the author of five books, including “In the Land of Magic Soldiers” and his latest, “Sing For Your Life,” about African American opera singer Daniel Speedo Green. He’s also a journalist who writes for the New York Times Magazine and other publications. David talks this hour with Interlochen Public Radio music host and producer Kate Botello. Program produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: David Maraniss

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:31

A conversation with journalist David Maraniss on the National Writers Series from Interlochen Public Radio.

Davidmaraniss_small Pulitzer-prize winning journalist David Maraniss says he was inspired to write his latest book after watching a now-iconic Chrysler commercial. David Maraniss was born in Detroit and is now an associate editor at the Washington Post. He’s written biographies of Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, Vince Lombardi, Roberto Clemente, and others. His newest book, “Once in a Great City,” traces the heyday of Detroit and its decline. He talks with fellow journalist John U. Bacon. Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Doug Stanton

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:31

A conversation with author and National Writers Series co-founder Doug Stanton.

Dougstanton_small Author Doug Stanton says we need to start talking honestly about Vietnam. National Writers Series co-founder Doug Stanton is the author of two bestselling nonfiction books, “In Harm’s Way,” about the sinking of the U.S.S. Indianapolis, and “Horse Soldiers,” about a U.S. Special Forces team deployed to Afghanistan after 9/11. That book has been made into a movie called "12 Strong." Stanton’s latest book is "The Odyssey of Echo Company: The 1969 Tet Offensive and the Epic Battle to Survive the Vietnam War." He talks this hour with author and editor Colin Harrison, who edited Stanton’s last two books. Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Jodi Picoult

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:31

A conversation with bestselling author Jodi Picoult.

Jodipicoult_small Jodi Picoult has written ten New York Times number one bestsellers, including "Small Great Things," which was inspired by the real-life experience of an African American nurse working at a Flint hospital, and deals with issues of prejudice, race, and justice. Her latest book is "A Spark of Light." Picoult talks this hour with Detroit News columnist Neal Rubin. Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Margaret Atwood

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

A conversation with bestselling author Margaret Atwood.

Margaretatwood_small Margaret Atwood is the author of many bestselling novels such as "The Handmaid's Tale" and "Cat's Eye." Her latest books include "Hag-Seed," which is a retelling of Shakespeare's play "The Tempest," and "Angel Catbird," a graphic novel featuring a cat-bird superhero. Margaret Atwood talks this hour with author and National Writers Series co-founder Doug Stanton. Event recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in October 2016. Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Beth Macy

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:29

Investigative journalist Beth Macy talks with Interlochen Public Radio executive director Peter Payette about her latest book, "Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug Company that Addicted America."

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In one of Beth Macy’s previous books, Factory Man, she profiled a furniture maker in rural Virginia struggling to stay in business in an era of rising competition from Asia. In her latest book Dopesick, she returns to central Appalachia to explore the result of economic distress in these small towns: increasing drug addiction and overdose deaths, especially to OxyContin and heroin. Beth talks this hour with Interlochen Public Radio executive director Peter Payette. She told Peter that the only way she was able to deal with the subject matter for Dopesick was to focus on what’s being done to solve the problem. Produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Anna Quindlen

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:29

New York Times columnist and author Anna Quindlen talks with Michigan Radio host Cynthia Canty.

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Anna Quindlen is a New York Times columnist and a prolific author of novels and nonfiction books. Her book “One True Thing” was made into a movie starring Meryl Streep. Quindlen’s latest novel is “Alternate Side,” about a New York City family whose idyllic life is shaken by a violent act on their quiet cul-de-sac. She talks this hour with Cynthia Canty, host of the Michigan Radio program Stateside. Cynthia asked what Anna wanted to be before she decided to become a writer. This event was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in March 2018. Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Mary Roach

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:31

Science writer Mary Roach talks with author and actor Benjamin Busch.

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Mary Roach writes books about science that have a sense of humor. She’s written eight books, including “Stiff,” about human cadavers, and “Bonk,” about the science of sex. Roach’s latest book is “Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.” She talks this hour with actor and author Benjamin Busch. He asked Roach about her beginnings as an author, writing press releases for the San Francisco Zoo from a trailer next to the gorilla exhibit. This event was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in June 2017. Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Sebastian Junger and Philip Caputo

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:32

Retired U.S. diplomat Jack Segal talks with author and documentary filmmaker Sebastian Junger and journalist and novelist Philip Caputo.

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Sebastian Junger is an author and documentary filmmaker. His book “The Perfect Storm” was made into a Hollywood movie. Sebastian’s latest book is “Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging.” Sebastian Junger is joined by journalist Philip Caputo, who wrote the Vietnam memoir “A Rumor of War.” Philip and Sebastian talk with retired U.S. diplomat and political advisor Jack Segal. Jack asked Philip to start the discussion by reading from “A Rumor of War.” This event was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in November 2017. Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Drew Philp

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

Drew Philp, author of “A $500 House in Detroit: Rebuilding an Abandoned Home and an American City," talks with WTCM NewsTalk 580 radio host Ron Jolly.

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At age 23, Drew Philp moved to Detroit and bought a house for $500. He spent the next few years renovating it, living without heat or electricity. Drew wrote a book about his experience, called “A $500 House in Detroit: Rebuilding an Abandoned Home and an American City.” He talks this hour with WTCM NewsTalk 580 radio host Ron Jolly. Ron asked Drew where he grew up. This event was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in April 2018. Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Eileen McNamara

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

Interlochen Public Radio reporter Morgan Springer talks with Pulizer Prize-winning journalist Eileen McNamara about her book, "Eunice: The Kennedy Who Changed the World."

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Eunice Kennedy Shriver was the sister of President John F. Kennedy, and Senators Robert F. Kennedy and Ted Kennedy. Pulizer Prize-winning journalist Eileen McNamara worked at the Boston Globe for 30 years as a reporter and columnist. Her latest book is called “Eunice: The Kennedy Who Changed the World.” Eileen talks this hour with Interlochen Public Radio reporter Morgan Springer. Morgan asked Eileen why she gets angry when people lump all the Kennedy sisters together. This event was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in April 2018. Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Eileen McNamara

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

Interlochen Public Radio reporter Morgan Springer talks with Pulizer Prize-winning journalist Eileen McNamara about her book, "Eunice: The Kennedy Who Changed the World."

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Eunice Kennedy Shriver was the sister of President John F. Kennedy, and Senators Robert F. Kennedy and Ted Kennedy. Pulizer Prize-winning journalist Eileen McNamara worked at the Boston Globe for 30 years as a reporter and columnist. Her latest book is called “Eunice: The Kennedy Who Changed the World.” Eileen talks this hour with Interlochen Public Radio reporter Morgan Springer. Morgan asked Eileen why she gets angry when people lump all the Kennedy sisters together. This event was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in April 2018. Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: David Grann

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:31

David Grann, a New Yorker magazine staff writer and author of "The Lost City of Z" and "Killers of the Flower Moon," talks with editor and publisher Lucas Wittman.

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David Grann is a New Yorker magazine staff writer and author of The Lost City of Z. His new book is called Killers of the Flower Moon. David talks this hour with editor and publisher Lucas Wittmann. Lucas asked David to tell him more about his new book. This  event was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in May 2018. Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Mona Hanna-Attisha

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, author of "What the Eyes Don't See," talks with WKAR station manager Peter Whorf.

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Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha is a pediatrician, scientist and professor. In 2015, she held a press conference to announce that children in Flint had dangerous levels of lead in their bodies. She documented how lead levels had doubled since the city's water source switched from the Detroit River to the Flint River the previous year. Since then, awareness of the city's water issues has spread across the world, and yet Flint is still struggling to provide safe water to its citizens. Dr. Mona talks this hour with WKAR station manager Peter Whorf. Peter asked Mona to start off by reading from her book, "What the Eyes Don't See."

National Writers Series: David Ebershoff

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:29

David Ebershoff, author of "The Danish Girl," talks with fellow author David Griffith.

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David Ebershoff’s novel The Danish Girl is about a Danish man named Einar Wegener who becomes one of the first people to seek out gender-altering surgery to become a woman, named Lili Elbe. The book was made into a movie in 2015. David talks this hour with writer David Griffith, who asked Ebershoff if he knew when he was writing The Danish Girl that it would interest the public so widely. This event was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in May 2016. Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Joe Hill

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

Joe Hill, horror writer and son of legendary author Stephen King, talks with fellow author Loren Estleman.

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Joe Hill was born with the name Joseph King: he’s the son of legendary author Stephen King. But Joe writes under the last name “Hill” out of a desire to succeed on his own merits. Now he’s recognized as one of today’s best horror writers.  Joe Hill’s novels include “Heart Shaped Box” and “The Fireman.” His latest book is “Strange Weather,” which is made up of four short novels. Joe talks this hour with fellow author Loren Estleman, who is best known for a series of crime novels featuring the investigator Amos Walker. Joe started off talking about and reading from one of the stories from “Strange Weather.” Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Alice Walker

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:31

Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist, poet, and essayist Alice Walker talks with Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley.

Tom_haxby_-_alice_walker_small_small Alice Walker published her first book in 1968, making 2018 the 50th anniversary of her writing career. She’s authored dozens of works since then, including poetry, essays, short stories and novels. Alice won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for her novel The Color Purple, becoming the first African American to receive that honor. Alice Walker is also known for her activism for human rights. Her latest book is a collection of poetry called Taking the Arrow Out of the HeartAlice talks this hour with Detroit Free Press columnist Rochelle Riley. Rochelle asked Alice what her proudest moment has been so far. 
Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Amy Goldstein

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

Washington Post staff writer Amy Goldstein talks with To the Best of Our Knowledge radio producer Shannon Henry Kleiber about Amy's book "Janesville."

Tom_haxby_-_agoldstein_small_small Amy Goldstein is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and a long-time staff writer at the Washington Post. Her book Janesville: An American Story is about the city of Janesville, Wisconsin, whose General Motors plant closed during the Great Recession. Amy talks this hour with Shannon Henry Kleiber, a radio producer for To the Best of Our Knowledge from Wisconsin Public Radio and PRX. Shannon asked Amy to start off by reading from her book Janesville.
Show produced by Linnaea Melcarek.

National Writers Series: Tayari Jones

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

Novelist Tayari Jones talks with fellow writer Aaron Stander about her latest book, "An American Marriage."

Tom_haxby_-_tayari_jones-small_small Tayari Jones has written four novels, including Silver Sparrow and The Untelling. Her latest book, An American Marriage, is a love story challenged by racial injustice. Tayari talks this hour with fellow writer Aaron Stander, author of ten crime novels and host of Interlochen Public Radio’s “Michigan Writers on the Air.” Tayari starts by telling Aaron why she prefers writing her books on a typewriter.

National Writers Series: Richard Clarke

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

Long-time presidential adviser Richard Clarke talks about his latest book, "Warnings: Finding Cassandras to Stop Catastrophes" with retired diplomat and co-chair of Traverse City’s International Affairs Forum, Jack Segal.

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Over his long career in public service, Richard Clarke has been an adviser to presidents Reagan, Clinton, and both Bushes. His 2004 memoir Against All Enemies was critical of multiple administrations for their lax approach toward counter-terrorism before and after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and of the Bush administration’s decision to wage war in Iraq. Richard has also written four fictional thrillers. Richard’s latest book is called Warnings: Finding Cassandras to Stop Catastrophes. He talks this hour with fellow retired political adviser, and co-chair of Traverse City’s International Affairs Forum, Jack Segal. Jack asked Richard to explain who “Cassandra” refers to in the title of his book.

National Writers Series: John U. Bacon

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

John U. Bacon talks about his latest book, "The Great Halifax Explosion."

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John U. Bacon is a journalist, commentator and educator, and he’s written books on sports and business. His latest book tells the tale of a historical event that isn’t as well-known as it probably should be: the great Halifax Explosion. In 1917, a French ship carrying volatile explosives was hit by another ship in the harbor in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. The resulting fire caused the ship to explode, which resulted in a disaster killing and injuring thousands.  John U. Bacon starts off talking about how he went from writing books about football to writing about the Halifax explosion.

National Writers Series: Benjamin Percy

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

Author Benjamin Percy talks about his writing and his novel "Red Moon" with friend and fellow writer Jeremy Chamberlin.

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Benjamin Percy’s writing could be classified as genre fiction, but with a twist. His book Red Moon is about werewolves, but it’s also a commentary on the war on terror. And his newest novel, The Dark Net, is a techno-thriller that imagines the sordid corners of the Internet as full of actual demons. Benjamin talks this hour with his friend and fellow writer, Jeremy Chamberlin. Their conversation was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in September 2013. Percy started the discussion talking about his appetite for books as a child. 

National Writers Series: Diana Gabaldon

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:29

Diana Gabaldon talks about her "Outlander" series of books with Deb Leonard.

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Diana Gabaldon’s bestselling “Outlander” series of novels begins by telling the story of a young nurse during World War 2. She travels back in time to 18th century Scotland. Diana has published eight “Outlander” books, and she says her ninth one, called “Go Tell the Bees that I Have Gone,” should be released this year. The books have been developed into a popular TV show on Starz. Diana talks this hour with Deb Leonard, a member of the board of directors for the Book Industry Charitable Foundation, and a bookseller at Literati Bookstore in Ann Arbor. Their conversation was recorded at the Traverse City Opera House in July 2014. Deb asked Diana if she could describe her books to someone who’s never read them. 

NOTE: PLEASE AIR THIS PROGRAM IN 2019 DUE TO DATED REFERENCE TO BOOK RELEASE IN INTRO.

National Writers Series: Greg Iles

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

Author Greg Iles talks with National Writers Series co-founder Doug Stanton.

Gregiles_small Greg Iles is known for his Penn Cage series of thrillers that take place in Natchez, Mississippi. Iles’s newest book, coming out in March of this year, is “Cemetery Road.” It’s a stand-alone novel of friendship, betrayal, and secrets that threaten to destroy a small Mississippi town. Doug Stanton talked with Greg Iles at the Traverse City Opera House in April 2017. At that time, his book “Mississippi Blood” had just been released.  It’s the third book in his Natchez Burning trilogy. Greg Iles began writing the trilogy while recovering from a traffic accident that almost killed him. Doug asked Iles to tell him more about “Mississippi Blood.”

National Writers Series: Harlan Coben

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

Author of thrillers and mysteries Harlan Coben talks with National Writers Series co-founder Doug Stanton.

Harlancoben_small Harlan Coben has published over 30 novels. His book "Tell No One" was made into a film of the same name. In the past few years, Harlan’s created three TV shows available on Netflix: No Second Chance, The Five, and Safe. His latest novel “Run Away” will come out in March of this year. Doug Stanton spoke with Harlan on the stage of the Traverse City Opera House in July 2015. At that time, his book “The Stranger” had just come out. Doug asked Harlan to tell him about how he balances his work with his family life.

National Writers Series: Gillian Flynn

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series series | 54:30

"Gone Girl" author Gillian Flynn talks with National Writers Series co-founder Doug Stanton.

Gillian-flynn-hjbphoto-cropped_small Gillian Flynn is best known as the author of “Gone Girl.” She also wrote the screenplay of the film version. Since then, Gillian has written more for the big and small screen. She co-wrote the screenplay for the 2018 film “Widows,” as well as the TV adaptation of her book “Sharp Objects.” She also wrote the series “Utopia,” which will be released by Amazon this year. Doug Stanton spoke to Gillian at the Traverse City Opera House in April 2013. She told him she loved macabre stories since she was a child, when her father played her movies that were possibly inappropriate for her age.

National Writers Series: Tommy Tomlinson

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series: Season Two series | 54:29

Reporter and columnist Tommy Tomlinson talks with Elon Cameron about his memoir, "The Elephant In the Room: One Fat Man's Quest to Get Smaller in a Growing America."

Tommytomlinson_small_small Tommy Tomlinson spent 23 years as a reporter and columnist for the Charlotte Observer newspaper, and he’s written for publications including Esquire and Sports Illustrated. Since childhood, Tommy has struggled with obesity, and he decided to change his life by losing weight. He wrote about the process in his memoir, “The Elephant In the Room: One Fat Man’s Quest to Get Smaller in a Growing America.” Tommy talks this hour with acupuncturist and storyteller Elon Cameron. Tommy told Elon that when he started writing his book, he weighed 460 pounds.

National Writers Series: Keith Gave

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series: Season Two series | 54:30

Keith Gave, author of "The Russian Five: A Story of Espionage, Defection, Bribery and Courage" talks with Tim Rappleye.

Keithgave_small_small Keith Gave spent six years in the U.S. Army, where he worked as a Russian linguist for the National Security Agency. When he left the army, Keith became a sports reporter covering hockey for the Detroit Free Press. He didn’t know then how his Russian experience would play a role in his journalism career. Keith explains it all in his book “The Russian Five: A Story of Espionage, Defection, Bribery and Courage.” This hour, Keith talks with fellow author, journalist and hockey fan Tim Rappleye. Keith told Tim that he was working on a new project.

National Writers Series: Lisa Scottoline

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series: Season Two series | 54:30

Thriller writer Lisa Scottoline talks with Michigan Radio producer Cynthia Canty.

Lisa-scottoline-small_small Lisa Scottoline is known for her legal thrillers, including the Rosato and Associates series, about women who are partners at a law firm. She's written thirty-two novels, and her latest book, "Someone Knows," is a stand-alone novel that tells the story of five teenagers whose lives are shattered after a dangerous prank goes wrong. Lisa also writes a weekly column for the Philadelphia Inquirer with her daughter. Those columns have been adapted into a series of memoirs, including 'Why My Third Husband Will Be A Dog." Lisa talks this hour with Michigan Radio producer and host of Stateside, Cynthia Canty. Cynthia asked Lisa to describe her latest book.
 

National Writers Series: Elizabeth Berg, Elizabeth Letts and Lynne Olson

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series: Season Two series | 54:31

National Writers Series co-founder Doug Stanton talks with authors Elizabeth Berg, Elizabeth Letts, and Lynne Olson.

Berg-olson-letts-small_small Lynne Olson, Elizabeth Berg, and Elizabeth Letts all join Doug Stanton on the stage of the Traverse City Opera House to talk about their work. Author and journalist Lynne Olson is known for her books about history, especially World War II. Her latest is “Madame Fourcade’s Secret War.” Elizabeth Berg writes novels, such as “Open House” and “The Story of Arthur Truluv.” And Elizabeth Letts writes books of non-fiction and historical fiction. Her latest is about “Wizard of Oz” author Frank L. Baum’s wife, Maud Baum. Doug Stanton asked each author to describe their latest book. Lynne Olson went first.

National Writers Series: Marie Benedict

From Interlochen Public Radio | Part of the National Writers Series: Season Two series | 54:30

Journalist and director of arts and culture for the city of Detroit Rochelle Riley interviews author Marie Benedict.

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Marie Benedict is a former lawyer who’s written ten novels. Her latest book, “The Only Woman in the Room,” is a work of historical fiction about the actress from the golden age of Hollywood, Hedy Lamarr. In addition to her acting career, Hedy was also an inventor. In the 1940s, she created a radio guidance system that eventually led to the development of Bluetooth and Wi-Fi technology. Marie Benedict talks this hour with journalist and director of arts and culture for the city of Detroit, Rochelle Riley. Rochelle asked Marie to explain why some of her books are written under the name Marie Benedict, and others as Heather Terrell.