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Playlist: Ozark Highlands Radio's Portfolio

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Ozark Highlands Radio series includes 40 original programs, 12 evergreens and a generic fundraiser each season.

Each program is available with five (5) segments for automation; three music and interview segments with a run times of 18: 59 and two :59 second music bed ( 20 past and 40 past the hour) for local weather and promos. Total runtime is 59:00.

The program is also available as a single 59:00 file with music beds and breaks as noted above.

Ozark Highlands Radio features:

-Live music and interviews recorded at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mt. View, Arkansas. Music and interviews are pulled from current multi track in-house recordings from the Ozark Folk Center’s 1000 seat indoor performance venue. Archived recordings are also featured and are pulled from an extensive catalog dating back to 1973.

-Feature Host segments with historians, authors and personalities exploring the people, stories and history of the Ozark region

-Bonus content on ozarkhighlandsradio.com includes extended interviews and additional live recordings from featured artists.

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Ozark Highlands Radio series includes 40 original programs, 12 evergreens and a generic fundraiser each season. Each program is available with five (5) segments for automation; three music and interview segments with a run times of 18: 59 and two :59 second music bed ( 20 past and 40 past the hour) for local weather and promos. Total runtime is 59:00. The program is also available as a single 59:00 file with music beds and breaks as noted above. Ozark Highlands Radio features: -Live music and interviews recorded at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mt. View, Arkansas. Music and interviews are pulled from current multi track in-house recordings from the Ozark Folk Center’s 1000... Show full description

Featured

OHR013: OHR Presents: Dave Branscum, 3/28/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Arkansas Delta Bluegrass pioneer Dave Branscum performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Dave, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of noted Ozark mountain dulcimer mentor Judi Klemenson.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Arkansas Delta Bluegrass pioneer Dave Branscum performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Dave, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of Judi Klemenson.

Dave Branscum was born and raised in the cotton fields of the Arkansas Delta.  A working man most of his life, Dave had always dreamed of moving to the Ozarks to enjoy a simple life, where he could play music and enjoy all the region has to offer.  Good thing all that happened because Dave is now a regular performer at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Equally adept on guitar and claw-hammer banjo, Dave possesses a natural feel in his playing and singing unique to the Ozark region.  Dave says come visit the Ozark Folk Center rather than the website he’s yet to create.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and an enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on the founding of the Ozark Folk Center State Park.

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of noted Ozark mountain dulcimer mentor Judi Klemenson (Klinkhammer) performing the song “Where Would I Go But to the Lord,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR016: OHR Presents: Betse Ellis & Clarke Wyatt, 4/18/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Dynamic traditional Ozark music duo Betse Ellis & Clarke Wyatt perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Betse & Clarke, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of original Ozark songster Bob Blair.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Dynamic traditional Ozark music duo Betse Ellis & Clarke Wyatt perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Betse & Clarke, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of original Ozark songster Bob Blair.

Betse Ellis & Clarke Wyatt are a fiddle and banjo duo, who specialize in traditional old time music of the Ozarks.  For years Betse was the fiery fiddler in the touring group, The Wilders.  A student and friend of Arkansas fiddle legend, Violet Hensley, Betse has made it her mission to carry on the traditional songs and fiddle style of her native Arkansas.  Betse has enjoyed a successful solo career but has recently teamed up with Clarke Wyatt, a talented claw-hammer banjo picker.  Now a powerful team, together Betse and Clarke continue to explore the sounds and styles that make Ozark music unique. 

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and an enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on the beautiful gardens of the Ozark Folk Center State Park, and it’s mission to preserve the original ornamental, edible, and medicinal plants of the Ozarks.

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of original Ozark songster Bob Blair,  performing the song “Who Will Sing For Me,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR022: OHR Presents: "The Leatherwoods", 5/30/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Original Ozark Stringband “The Leatherwoods” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with “The Leatherwoods,” a performance from “The Apple Brothers,” Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly present memoirs of Jean Ritchie, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark musician Freeman Thomas.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, the Original Ozark Stringband “The Leatherwoods ” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with “The Leatherwoods,” a performance from “The Apple Brothers,”   Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly present memoirs of Jean Ritchie, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark musician Freeman Thomas.

“The Leatherwoods” have been a mainstay in the Arkansas music scene for years.  Their songs and musical traditions have been passed down through many generations of Ozark families.  Lead by Pam Setser on vocals, guitar and mountain dulcimer, “The Leatherwoods” features some of the area’s finest musicians including Roger Fountain on fiddle, Teresa Johns on bass/vocals, and the omnipresent Danny Dozier on guitar and mandolin.

Renowned folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode focuses on Jean Ritchie’s memories of her family’s first radio, and her impressions of how “Hill Music” was presented in that media.

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of Ozark original Freeman Thomas performing the true folk song “Cowboy Wheel,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR023: OHR Presents: "Locust Honey", 6/6/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Nashville based neo-folk stringband “Locust Honey” performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with “Locust Honey,” Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly present a history of the “play party,” and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of original Ozark fiddler Red Gillihan.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Nashville based neo-folk stringband “Locust Honey” performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with “Locust Honey,” Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly present a history of the “Play Party,” and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of original Ozark fiddler Red Gillihan.

“Locust Honey” features the guitar, fiddle, and harmony singing of Meredith Watson and Chloe Edmonstone.  After forming a musical partnership in Asheville, NC, the two have been touring the US and abroad since 2012.  Their 2014 release, “Never Let Me Cross Your Mind” was in the top ten on the Folk DJ Charts for much of that year, and earned them an international audience. While their musical backgrounds are quite diverse, it’s easy to hear traditional old time and classic country influences in their music.   

Renowned folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode focuses on the history of “play parties,” a type of traditional party game that originated in Batesville, Arkansas, and became common in 19th Century North America.

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of original Ozark fiddler Red Gillihan performing his very own “KBTA Waltz,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR024: OHR Presents: Lukas Pool & "The Moonlight Ramblers", 6/13/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Nationally recognized clawhammer banjo prodigy and Stone County native Lukas Pool with his band “The Moonlight Ramblers” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Lukas, Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly relate Jean Ritchie’s childhood recollections of a real old fashioned mountain Christmas, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of original Ozarker Horance Smith.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Nationally recognized clawhammer banjo prodigy and Stone County native Lukas Pool with his band “The Moonlight Ramblers” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Lukas, Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly relate Jean Ritchie’s childhood recollections of a real old fashioned mountain Christmas, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of original Ozarker Horance Smith.

Lukas Pool has done quite well, playing claw hammer banjo.  After honing his craft in the fertile musical grounds of Stone County, AR, Lukas went on to win a few national banjo championships, and study at the Berklee College of Music. He later went on to become the first dedicated instructor at Berklee in the claw hammer style.  In recent years, Lukas performed with Steve Martin (yes, the actor AND banjo player) among other notable gigs.  Along with his partner, Eden Forman, Lukas began building instruments under the Ozark Banjo Co. moniker.  Lukas and Eden (fiddle) are joined in this recorded performance by John Mailander on mandolin and fiddle, and Nick DiSebastian on guitar. 

Renowned folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode relates Jean Ritchie’s own childhood memories of an early Ritchie Family Christmas.

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of original Ozarker Horance Smith performing “Hobo’s Meditation,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR029: OHR Presents: "The Poor Valley Girls", 7/18/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

East Tennessee all-girl stringboard “The Poor Valley Girls” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, Interviews with The Poor Valley Girls, Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly present “Women Warrior Ballads,” and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Jay Round.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, East Tennessee all-girl stringboard “The Poor Valley Girls” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, Interviews with The Poor Valley Girls, Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly present “Women Warrior Ballads,” and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Jay Round.

The “Poor Valley Girls” hail from the hallowed musical grounds of Northeast Tennessee and Southwest Virginia.  “Poor Valley” refers to the geographical region that both Heather Pace and Madison Brown call home in Virginia.  This region of the United States also includes Bristol, TN, which is known for the “sonic-boom” of country music recordings, on the Victor Record label in the early 1920’s (Jimmy Rogers and The Carter Family, among others.)  For their performance at the Ozark Folk Center State Park, Heather and Madison are joined by friend and musician, Colleen Trenwith.  This recording is a wonderful example of how the traditional sounds of their region have moved seamlessly to the next generation of musicians.

Prolific folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode offers a presentation of “Women Warrior Ballads.”

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Ozark original Jay Round performing the traditional song “Soldiers’ Joy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR007: OHR Presents: "Dulcimer Weekend", 2/15/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

National mountain and hammered dulcimer champions past & present perform live at the Ozark Folk Center in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, Brooks Blevins: “Where did the word ‘Ozark’ come from?,” and Mark Jones' "Vault" segment features Buddy Lancaster.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

Dulcimer Jamboree Weekend is an immensely popular annual workshop at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  It features three days of performance and instruction from some of the finest dulcimer players (mountain and hammered) in the United States.  This program features highlights of the weekend performances including; Jeff Hames, Duane Porterfield, Jess Dickinson, Larry Conger, Russell Cook, and local duo Jack and Mary Geiger.

Brooks Blevins provides a native’s view of the people, music, and colorful events that shape the Ozark region. The author and historian presents an exploration of the roots of the term “Ozark.”

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment features an archival recording of Stone County native fiddler Buddy Lancaster playing “Bear Creek Hop,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR031: OHR Presents: "The Roe Family Singers", 8/1/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Minnesota Old Time quartet “The Roe Family Singers” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with the Roe Family Singers, Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly present a discussion on African roots in American folk music, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Barbara Sanders.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Minnesota Old Time quartet “The Roe Family Singers” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with the Roe Family Singers, Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly present a discussion on African roots in American folk music, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Barbara Sanders.

The “Roe Family Singers” are led by the husband and wife duo of Quillan and Kim Roe.  With traditional old time instrumentation (guitar, auto harp, and claw hammer style banjo,) the group performs a wide variety of traditional old time tunes.  What separates them from similar bands are the exceptional vocal harmonies and high energy of their song interpretations.  

Prolific folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode offers a discussion on African roots in traditional American folk music.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Ozark original Barbara Sanders performing the song “Gypsy’s Warning,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR034: OHR Presents: Wil Maring & Robert Bowlin, 8/22/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Accomplished modern folk performers and songwriters Wil Maring & Robert Bowlin perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Wil & Robert, Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith and producer Jeff Glover discuss the fine points of what makes “folk music,” and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Clark Fowler leading the “Sacred Harp Singers.”

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, accomplished modern folk performers and songwriters Wil Maring & Robert Bowlin perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Wil & Robert, Dave Smith and producer Jeff Glover ask the question “What is folk music,” and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Clark Fowler leading the “Sacred Harp Singers.”

Wil Maring got her start as a songwriter, picking out songs, while working at her family’s roadside fruit stand outside Carbondale, IL.  And while she’s since traveled the world, Wil continues to call rural Illinois her home.  Her voice and songwriting reflect the natural, uncomplicated beauty of the rural Midwest.  

Wil is joined by her longtime musical collaborator Robert Bowlin.  Robert is an accomplished guitarist and fiddle player, and a native of Pocahontas, Arkansas.  He has extensive credits for guitar and fiddle, performing with Bill Monroe and Kathy Mattea, among other notable musicians.

Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith and producer Jeff Glover discuss the fine points of what makes “folk music,” drawing from interviews & perspectives of various folk musicians.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of legendary shape note expert Clark Fowler, leading the Sacred Harp Singers in a traditional rendition of the song “Angel Band,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR035: OHR Presents: "The Next Generation", 8/29/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

A select few of the next generation of Ozark folk musicians perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with the teachers and administrators of an innovative new school music program called “Music Roots.” Historian & folklorist Charley Sandage presents an exploration of the Ozark Folk Center as an institution of learning, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman performing the song “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot.”

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, a select few of the next generation of Ozark folk musicians perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with the teachers and administrators of an innovative new school music program called “Music Roots.”  Historian & folklorist Charley Sandage presents an exploration of the Ozark Folk Center as an institution of learning, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman performing the song “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot.”

Started by local musician Joe Jewell, the “Next Generation” concert is a long standing tradition at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  The show features area musicians and performers, all under the age of 21.  The continued success of the concert series is a testament to the deep well of music and tradition the community has to draw upon. Featured performances by; The Cobb Brothers, Clancey Ferguson, Twang, Grace Stormont and Sibling Rivalry.

Historian & folklorist Charley Sandage presents an exploration of the Ozark Folk Center as an institution of learning.  Charley interviews Folk Center staff about their role in presenting, preserving, and promoting traditional ways of the Ozark region through various educational activities and workshops.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman, performing the classic song “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR001: OHR Presents: Jay Ungar & Molly Mason, 10/10/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Jay Ungar & Molly Mason perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Jay & Molly, a performance from the Lazy Goat String Band, Brooks Blevins: Ghost of the Ozarks Tale, and Mark Jones' "Vault" segment featuring Jimmy Driftwood.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

Jay Ungar & Molly Mason are veterans of the acoustic music scene on the east coast and have been performing together for well over 20 years and it really shows. Jay and Molly’s performance at the Ozark Folk Center State Park highlights all aspects of their musical style and ability.

The Lazy Goat String Band is comprised of Scott and Samuel Blake (father & son) on guitar and claw-hammer banjo and Emily Phillips on fiddle. They have regular performers at the Ozark Folk Center State Park for the past several years and one of the more popular, in demand groups in the region. Their attention to the authenticity of their sound is just as keen as their eye on making music a fun endeavor. Had he known, Ken Burns might have used some of their recordings in The Civil War, they would be right at home. 

Brooks Blevins gives a native’s view of the people, music, and colorful events that shape the Ozark region.  The author and historian presents the first of his three part series "Ghost of the Ozarks," on the infamous Connie Franklin murder trial.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of Jimmy Driftwood singing his hit song "The Battle of New Orleans," from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.   

OHR003: OHR Presents: Willie Watson, 10/24/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Old Crow Medicine Show founder Willie Watson performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Willie Watson, a performance from up and coming folk artist Grace Stormont, Brooks Blevins: Ghost of the Ozarks Tale (part 3,) and Mark Jones' "Vault" segment featuring Almeda Riddle.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

Old Crow Medicine Show founder Willie Watson performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Willie Watson, a performance from up and coming folk artist Grace Stormont, Brooks Blevins: Ghost of the Ozarks Tale (part 3,) and Mark Jones' "Vault" segment featuring Almeda Riddle.

Willie Watson is a folk singer. It’s even the title of his latest solo release. Willie was once part of the popular band Old Crow Medicine Show but has recently embarked on a solo career that finds him singing, playing guitar, banjo and harmonica. Interpreting tunes from a wide variety of influences including Ledbelly and Charley Jordan among others, Willie proves he’s right where he belongs.

Grace Stormont moved to Mountain View, Arkansas from a nearby town to be part of the local music scene. She has embraced the music community beyond anyone’s expectations (except maybe her own). With a powerful voice, a veteran sense of timing and feel, Grace performs with a skill beyond her age of just 15. She’s also a big Willie Watson fan, so this worked out great.

Brooks Blevins provides a native’s view of the people, music, and colorful events that shape the Ozark region.  The author and historian presents the conclusion of his three part series "Ghost of the Ozarks," about the infamous Connie Franklin murder trial.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment features a hauntingly beautiful acapella recording of roots music legend Almeda Riddle singing the classic song “Amazing Grace,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.    

OHR010: OHR Presents: Thom Bresh, 10/31/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Thumbpicking guitar legacy Thom Bresh performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of Ozark folk musician Greg Moody.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments carry listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

On this week’s show, thumb picking guitar legacy Thom Bresh performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of Ozark folk musician Greg Moody.

Thom Bresh has led an incredible, multi-faceted life in the entertainment business.  To start, his birth father is guitar royalty, Merle Travis.  Thom was raised in California during the golden age of television and worked as a stuntman/actor during his youth.  He went on to become one of the premier practitioners of his fathers “thumbpicking” style of guitar.  Harnessing a quick wit and an equally quick set of ten fingers, there is nothing like a Thom Bresh performance.  Seriously.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and an enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode explores the origins of Ozark culture in Stone County, Arkansas.

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of Greg Moody singing the traditional folk song “Going Down This Road Feeling Bad,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR020: OHR Presents: "The Howlin' Brothers", 11/14/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Unconventional folk-blues-rock-bluegrass trio “The Howlin’ Brothers” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with “The Howlin’ Brothers,” Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly present memories of Bayless Ritchie, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of original Ozark musicians Aubrey Richardson & Mike McGee.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, the unconventional folk-blues-rock-bluegrass trio “The Howlin’ Brothers ” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with “The Howlin’ Brothers,” Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly present memories of Bayless Ritchie, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of original Ozark musicians Aubrey Richardson & Mike McGee. 

“The Howlin’ Brothers” are Ian Craft, Ben Plasse, and Jared Green.  The trio has a wide ranging appeal as evidenced by their popular performance at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Combining banjo, fiddle, guitar and upright bass, they perform traditional and original music with a sound familiar to fans of old time, roots, and Americana styles.  Of note is fiddler and banjo player Ian Craft, as he could be creating a new style of hybrid banjo playing.

Renowned folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode focuses on memories of Bayless Ritchie, and features Aubrey & Elwood’s performance of the traditional song “I am a Foreign Lander.”

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of Ozark originals Aubrey Richardson & Mike McGee, performing the traditional folk song “Cluck Ole Hen,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR026: OHR Presents: Mike Snider, 12/5/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Comedian, banjo prodigy, Grand Old Opry star and HeeHaw alum Mike Snider performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly discuss the cultural cross-pollination of traditional folk music, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of original Ozark musician Floyd Holland.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, comedian, banjo prodigy, Grand Old Opry star and HeeHaw alum Mike Snider performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly discuss the cultural cross-pollination of traditional folk music, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of original Ozark musician Floyd Holland.

Mike Snider plays banjo, and has a great sense of humor.  So much so, we’ve dedicated an entire program to his recent performance at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Mike is a long tenured member of the Nashville music scene, having performed on “Hee Haw” and the Grand Ole Opry among other notable venues.  He’s a former national champion banjo picker (3 finger style,) but has converted to the more traditional claw hammer style in recent years.  Mike is joined by a wonderful backing group of musicians for this performance.

Renowned folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode offers a discussion of cultural cross-pollination of traditional folk music, as illustrated through the traditional song “Red Rocking Chair.”

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of original Ozark musician Uncle  Floyd Holland, performing the tune “My Darling Nellie Grey,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR027: OHR Presents: Muriel Anderson, 12/12/2016

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

World renowned finger style and harp guitar phenom Muriel Anderson performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile authentic Ozark balladeer Almeda Riddle, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Grand Old Opry and Hee Haw star Grandpa Jones.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, world renowned finger style and harp guitar phenom Muriel Andersen performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile authentic Ozark balladeer Almeda Riddle, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Grand Old Opry and Hee Haw star Grandpa Jones.

Muriel Anderson is a former National Thumbpicking Guitar Champion, a fine 6 string picker, and practitioner of the many stringed harp guitar.  Creating a sound like no other, the harp guitar incorporates a multitude of strings that cover a wide sonic range.  The result can be both ethereal and otherworldly, or just downright mind blowing.  Muriel’s repertoire includes traditional folk music, world music, and original compositions. 

Prolific folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode offers a profile of authentic Ozark balladeer Almeda Riddle, and features an archival recording of Almeda singing the traditional ballad “Will the Weaver.”

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Grand Old Opry and “Hee Haw” star Grandpa Jones performing his song “Mountain Dew,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR051: OHR Presents: “Hoot & Holler”, 3/13/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Alternative folk duo “Hoot and Holler” performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with the talented duo. A performance and interviews from “The Ozark Banjo Company.” Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Walter Gosser singing the rare traditional classic, “Jimmy Brown the News Boy.” Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Lon Jordan.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, alternative folk duo “Hoot & Holler” performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with the talented duo.  A performance and interviews from “The Ozark Banjo Company.”  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Walter Gosser singing the rare traditional classic, “Jimmy Brown the News Boy.”  Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Lon Jordan.

“Hoot n’ Holler” are comprised of guitarist Mark Kilianski and fiddler Amy Alvey.  Like our other performers this week, their partnership has roots at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA.  Born from a love of American folk music, nurtured in Boston's burgeoning string band scene, and inspired by the authenticity and enduring spirit of traditional Appalachian mountain music, “Hoot & Holler” hit the road full time in 2016 while living in their camper van “Irene.”  Their tender harmonizing and songwriting comes across as simple, honest, and fresh to the ears.  Described as the perfect cross section of soulful grit and polished technique, you can expect the full range of dynamics when performing traditional and original old time fiddle tunes.  Like a sonic cross-country road trip, you can hear the soundscapes from different parts of the country in their original songs: from the dirgy Louisiana swamp to the stark and sparse beauty of a Southwestern desert. 

“The Ozark Banjo Company’s” Eden Forman (fiddle) and Lukas Pool (banjo) share a deep passion for old time and traditional American music.  The two met while studying at Berklee College of Music in Boston, MA.  Eden studied fiddle with Darol Anger and Bruce Molsky.  She finds her musical home in American old time fiddle music, but her repertoire extends into many directions.  Lukas grew up in Mountain View, Arkansas in the Ozark Mountains where he started playing banjo at the age of 12.  Most nights were spent on the courthouse square with his friends and family learning and growing with the sounds of Ozark music.  Lukas has had the honor of winning the national old-time banjo championship twice and has returned to Berklee as a guest professor.  The pair now resides in Mountain View, Arkansas where they own and operate the Ozark Banjo Co. which specializes in creating handmade traditional and custom banjos.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Walter Gosser singing the rare traditional classic, “Jimmy Brown the News Boy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.  This 1973 recording also features Guyman Gammill and Dean Hinesley on guitars.

From his series entitled “Fine Fiddlers of the Ozarks,” old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Lon Jordan.  This installment features archival recordings of the classic fiddle tunes “Wake Up Jacob and Let's Go A Hunting, Granny Will Your Dog Bite, Fever River, and The Bluebird Waltz.”

OHR052: OHR Presents: Roy Book Binder, 3/20/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Old time acoustic blues legend Roy Book Binder performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this celebrated legacy of the Reverend Gary Davis style of acoustic guitar blues. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark youth Dwight Moody singing the traditional classic, “In the Pines.” Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Skeeter Walden.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, old time acoustic blues legend Roy Book Binder performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this celebrated legacy of the Reverend Gary Davis style of acoustic guitar blues.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark youth Dwight Moody singing the traditional classic, “In the Pines.”  Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Skeeter Walden.

Guitarist Roy Book Binder has traveled the world as a solo performer for nearly 50 years. Roy’s career and playing style is heavily influenced by the late Reverend Gary Davis, who specialized in a unique style of guitar finger picking. Roy’s performances are as much a story of his life and experiences as they are a musical endeavor.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1973 recording of Ozark youth Dwight Moody singing the traditional classic, “In the Pines,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Fine Fiddlers of the Ozarks,” old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Skeeter Walden.  This installment features archival recordings of the classic fiddle tunes “Woody’s Hornpipe, Puncheon Floor, and Natchez on the Hill.”

OHR053: OHR Presents: “The Lost Bayou Ramblers”, 3/27/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Unique Grammy nominated Louisiana alternative Zydeco band “The Lost Bayou Ramblers” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with the Lost Bayou Ramblers. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Melvin Wrinkle singing the traditional song “Home Sweet Home.” Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Ben Pollard.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, unique Grammy nominated Louisiana alternative Zydeco band “The Lost Bayou Ramblers”  perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with the Lost Bayou Ramblers. 

The Lost Bayou Ramblers were formed in 1999 by brothers Andre and Louis Michot, performing the roots Cajun music they learned as members of Les Frères Michot, the family band their father and uncles formed in the 80's.  The brothers quickly began playing clubs and festivals around Louisiana, and taking the traditional music they were raised with to new levels of rhythmic energy and spontaneity.  Over the years, the group has continually integrated new sonic elements to its live performances, always experimenting and growing the show to what it's become today, an eclectic mix of modern sounds and rhythms with ancient Cajun melodies and lyrics.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Melvin Wrinkle singing the rare traditional song “Home Sweet Home,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Fine Fiddlers of the Ozarks,” old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Ben Pollard.  This installment features archival recordings of the classic fiddle tunes “Sand March, Hop Light Ladies, Dream Waltz, Silver Star Hornpipe, and Sail Away Red Dress.”

OHR057: OHR Presents: Merle Travis Thumbpicking Weekend 2016, 4/24/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Guitar legend Merle Travis performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. A performance by Merle’s son, Grammy award winning songwriter, guitarist, and actor Tom Bresh. Also, performances from two thumbpicking guitar national champions, Danny Dozier & Randy Buckner. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Dean Hinesley and Andre Cannard performing the song “I Don’t Love Nobody.”

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, guitar legend Merle Travis performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  A performance by Merle’s son, Grammy award winning songwriter, guitarist, and actor Tom Bresh.  Also, performances from two thumbpicking guitar champions, Danny Dozier & Randy Buckner.

In 1979, the Ozark Folk Center State Park created an event to honor thumbpicking legend Merle Travis.  In the early days the weekend featured a thumpicking contest and performances from the late Merle Travis and other popular guitarists.  Over the years the event has continued on, and now hosts Merle’s son, Thom Bresh, as the feature performer each year.  The event has grown to include traditional thumbpicking and contemporary fingerstyle guitar contests as well as workshops and jam sessions.  This week, we feature performances from Thom Bresh, Danny Dozier, Randy Buckner, and an archival recording of Merle Travis himself, performing at the very first Ozark Folk Center Merle Travis Thumbpicking Weekend.

Merle Robert Travis was an American country and western singer, songwriter, and guitarist born in Rosewood, Kentucky.  His song's lyrics often discussed both the lives and the economic exploitation of American coal miners.  Among his many well-known songs are "Sixteen Tons," "I am a Pilgrim," and "Dark as a Dungeon."  However, it is his unique guitar style, still called “Travis Picking” by guitarists, as well as his interpretations of the rich musical traditions of his native Muhlenberg County, Kentucky, for which he is best known today.  He was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1970 and elected to the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1977.

Thom Bresh has led an incredible, multi-faceted life in the entertainment business.  To start, his birth father is guitar royalty, Merle Travis.  Thom was raised in California during the golden age of television and worked as a stuntman/actor during his youth.  He went on to become one of the premier practitioners of his fathers “thumbpicking” style of guitar.  Harnessing a quick wit and an equally quick set of ten fingers, there is nothing like a Thom Bresh performance.

Danny Dozier is an Arkansas native and proud of it.  He is one of the area’s premier guitar players, well versed in the Merle Travis “thumbpicking” style.  Danny has worked with a wide variety of performers over the years including; Grandpa and Ramona Jones, Omar and the Howlers and regional favorite, The Leatherwoods.

Randy Buckner also plays the Merle Travis style of thumbpicking, as well as teaching guitar, banjo, ukulele, and mandolin in Springfield, Mo.  A Springfield native, Randy has been playing guitar since 1973.  He studied Jazz at Middle Tennessee State University, and has shared the stage with many great musicians including the legend himself, Merle Travis.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Dean Hinesley & Andre Cannard performing the classic song “I Don’t Love Nobody,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR056: OHR Offstage: Featuring Dom Flemons, Don Edwards & Jerron Paxton, 4/17/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Two Grammy Award winning old time musicians and an up and coming folk/blues sensation perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park Craft Village in Mountain View, Arkansas. Featured on this special episode are Dom Flemons, Don Edwards, and Jerron Paxton. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Adrian Parks singing the classic song “Under the Double Eagle.” Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Uncle Dick Hutchinson.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, two Grammy Award winning old time musicians and an up and coming folk/blues sensation perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park Craft Village.  Featured on this special episode are Dom Flemons, Don Edwards, and Jerron Paxton.

One of the unique experiences for visitors to the Ozark Folk Center is the intimate matinee performances by our guest musicians.  The shows are a unique way for musicians and guests share a time and space much different than a traditional indoor performance venue.  There are often Q &A sessions, jokes, stories and of course, the occasional request from an audience member that make these sets so popular.

These performances take place in the backdrop of the Ozark Folk Center State Park Craft Village, a large outdoor area, home to over 20 artisans who demonstrate traditional and contemporary craftsmanship on site.  Nestled in the center of the Craft Village is an old wooden covered stage.  The area seats about 50 people but is always overflowing with people for the matinee sets by our guest artists.

Dom Flemons is a Grammy Award winning musician & singer-songwriter.  Carrying on the songster tradition, Flemons strives to mix traditional music forms with a contemporary approach, to create new sounds that will appeal to wider audiences.  Flemons co-found the Carolina Chocolate Drops, an African-American string band that won a Grammy for its 2010 album Genuine Negro Jig. Today, he tours throughout the United States and internationally as “The American Songster. 

One of America’s best loved and most enduring cowboy singers, Don Edwards is indeed an American treasure.  His love and passion for traditional cowboy songs is second to none and has earned him a fan base worldwide.  He knows the songs, the stories, and even some of the old trails that made the old West famous.  Accompanied by his trusty guitar, Don takes us on a trip back in time when cowboy singers and songs echoed through the trails, taverns, and cattle drive camps of yesterday.

Jerron "Blind Boy" Paxton is an American musician from Los Angeles.  A vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, Paxton's style draws from blues and jazz music before World War II and was influenced by Fats Waller and "Blind" Lemon Jefferson.  According to Will Friedwald in the Wall Street Journal, Paxton is "virtually the only music-maker of his generation—playing guitar, banjo, piano and violin, among other implements—to fully assimilate the blues idiom of the 1920s and '30s, the blues of Bessie Smith and Lonnie Johnson."

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Adrian Parks performing the classic song “Under the Double Eagle,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Fine Fiddlers of the Ozarks,” old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Uncle Dick Hutchinson.  This installment features archival recordings of the classic fiddle tunes “Christmas Eve, Judge Parker Take Your Shackles Off, Hell on the Nine Mile, and Sharecropper’s Blues.”

OHR059: OHR Presents: Shane Adkins & Kirby Easler, 5/8/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

International guitar thumbpicking champion and songwriting humorist Shane Adkins performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Shane. Featured as well, a performance and interviews from up and coming modern thumpicking prodigy Kirby Easler. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman performing the song “From Mother’s Arms to Korea.” Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the Ozark tradition of square dances.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, international guitar thumbpicking champion and songwriting humorist Shane Adkins performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Shane.  Featured as well, a performance and interviews from up and coming modern thumpicking prodigy Kirby Easler.

Alabama guitarist Shane Adkins comes by his talent honestly.  As a boy, he learned from guitar legend and family friend Mose Rager in the heart of thumbpicking country, Drakesboro, KY.  Shane applied those lessons and went on win the International "Home of the Legends" Thumbpicking Contest in Muhlenberg County, KY and the International Fingerstyle Guitar Championship in Winfield, KS.  A talented songwriter, Shane takes a page from friend and fellow musician Mike Snider, writing songs with southern wit and humor.  This performance was as one of the featured musicians who appeared at the Ozark Folk Center State Park’s annual Thumbpicking Weekend in May of 2016.

Kirby Easler is a Nashville-based guitarist from Charleston, South Carolina, specializing in solo acoustic performance and fingerstyle arranging.  At 22 years of age, Kirby is a protégé of Grammy-winning guitarist John Knowles, CGP, and has worked and performed alongside some of the industry's top guitarists, including Thom Bresh and Tommy Emmanuel, CGP.  In 2015 Kirby placed second in the Contemporary division of the National Thumpicker's Hall of Fame guitar competition, and in April 2014 Kirby and her Yorkshire Terrier, Grabel, were featured on The Late Show with David Letterman for an episode of "Stupid Pet Tricks.”

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman performing the song “From Mother’s Arms to Korea,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Fine Fiddlers of the Ozarks,” old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the Ozark tradition of square dances.  This installment features archival recordings of actual Ozark square dances held in Galena, MO and Mt. Gaylor, AR in 1950.

OHR061: OHR Presents: Patsy Montana & Glenn Ohrlin, 5/29/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Original cowgirl, singer, songwriter, actress and Country Music Hall of Fame superstar Patsy Montana performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this country music legend. Also featured is the inimitable cowboy poet & humorist Glenn Ohrlin. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Cathy Barton performing the song “Ebenezer.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Dr. Bill McNeil, the long time archivist at the Ozark Folk Center.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, original cowgirl, singer, songwriter, actress and Country Music Hall of Fame superstar Patsy Montana performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this country music legend.  Also featured is the inimitable cowboy poet & humorist Glenn Ohrlin.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark legend Cathy Barton performing the song “Ebenezer.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Dr. Bill McNeil, the long time archivist at the Ozark Folk Center.

Patsy Montana, was an American country music singer, songwriter and actress.  Montana was the first female country performer to have a million-selling single with her signature song "I Want to Be a Cowboy's Sweetheart", and is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame.  She was a mainstay on the National Barn Dance on Chicago radio station WLS for many years.  Born “Ruby Blevins” in Beaudry, Arkansas, the 11th child and first daughter of a farmer, Patsy attended schools in President Bill Clinton's hometown of Hope, Arkansas.  She was influenced early on by the music of Jimmie Rodgers, and paved the way for women in the male dominated world of country music.

Born in Minneapolis, MN in 1926, Glenn Ohrlin was a veteran of the cattle industry and worked the rodeo circuit, both while being an acquisitive singer, poet, & story teller.  Glenn put his extensive knowledge and years of experience collecting Western folk songs into a book, “The Hell Bound Train,” as well as performing his authentic style of cowboy poetry & prose.  Ohrlin performed at cowboy poetry gatherings across America, and at the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C.  In the 1970’s, Glenn moved to Mountain View, Arkansas, where he continued his music career, lending regular performances at the Ozark Folk Center.  We at the Ozark Folk Center State Park reap the benefit of having years of Glenn’s live performance recordings in our archives.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Cathy Barton performing the traditional song “Ebenezer,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on Dr. Bill McNeil, the long time archivist at the Ozark Folk Center.  For thirty years, from 1975 until his untimely passing in 2005, Dr. Bill McNeil served as the Ozark Folk Center’s folklorist and all-purpose advisor on all things dealing with traditional Ozark culture.  During his tenure at the Folk Center, Bill McNeil guided the establishment of the Ozark Cultural Resource Center, an archival and teaching facility on the Folk Center’s grounds.

OHR062: OHR Presents: The Side Street Steppers, 6/5/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

The witty & convivial Americana ragtime, blues & early jazz quartet, “Side Street Steppers” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these fascinating performers. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Buddy Lancaster performing the traditional song “Back up & Push.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Dr. Bill McNeil, the long time archivist at the Ozark Folk Center, focusing on Dr. McNeil’s knowledge of traditional ballads.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, the witty & convivial Americana ragtime, blues & early jazz quartet, “Side Street Steppers” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these fascinating performers.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Buddy Lancaster performing the traditional song “Back up & Push.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Dr. Bill McNeil, the long time archivist at the Ozark Folk Center, focusing on Dr. McNeil’s knowledge of traditional ballads.

Christian Stanfield and Miss Vera Victoria founded the Side Street Steppers in June of 2009.  What began as a simple duo of musicians unearthing material from the Golden Age of American Gramophone recording has grown into a full-blown Memphis institution.  The Side Street Steppers are a page from Americas past, playing rare and popular music from the 1920s and 30s.  Dubbed the Golden Age of Gramophone Recording, the two decades between 1920 and World War II saw the rise of jazz and the birth of the blues, the demise of ragtime and the emergence of hillbilly music that would become known through the world as country music.  The Side Street Steppers present a pastiche of this transformation of the American musical landscape, performing on vintage and homemade instruments.  Get ready for plenty of hip-shaking, foot stompin', caterwauling and croonin’.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Buddy Lancaster performing the traditional song “Back up & Push,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on Dr. Bill McNeil, the long time archivist at the Ozark Folk Center.  For thirty years, from 1975 until his untimely passing in 2005, Dr. Bill McNeil served as the Ozark Folk Center’s folklorist and all-purpose advisor on all things dealing with traditional Ozark culture.  During his tenure at the Folk Center, Bill McNeil guided the establishment of the Ozark Cultural Resource Center, an archival and teaching facility on the Folk Center’s grounds.  This installment focuses on Dr. McNeil’s knowledge of traditional ballads.

OHR063: OHR Presents: The Lost & Nameless Orchestra, 6/12/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Austin, Texas based fiddle driven folk pop and renowned Contra Dance band “The Lost & Nameless Orchestra” performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this unique group of musicians. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a much younger Mark Jones performing the song “Mountain Whippoorwill.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Dr. Bill McNeil, the long time archivist at the Ozark Folk Center, focusing on Dr. McNeil’s attention to historical scholarship with regard to traditional music.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Austin, Texas based fiddle driven folk pop and renowned Contra Dance band “The Lost & Nameless Orchestra” performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this unique group of musicians.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a much younger Mark Jones performing the song “Mountain Whippoorwill.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Dr. Bill McNeil, the long time archivist at the Ozark Folk Center, focusing on Dr. McNeil’s attention to historical scholarship with regard to traditional music.

They may call themselves Lost & Nameless, but all it takes is a few notes for listeners to recognize this foursome is anything but.  With original compositions featuring complex, turn-on-a-dime arrangements and performing histories dating to childhood, the members of this Austin-based band are seasoned professionals who whip up an unforgettable sonic whirlwind wherever they play.  Lost & Nameless can be traced to St. Louis, where Arkansas fiddle champion Chris E. Peterson met vocalist/guitarist Patrick Conway in 1993.  They began jamming together and did some busking and recording in Europe, then went their separate ways.  Peterson eventually moved to Austin to attend graduate school and in 2006, Conway followed.  They decided to form “a great live band” and within a week, found keyboardist Nathan Quiring.  Vocalist/fiddler Kimberly Zielnicki, winner of the 2012 Old Settler’s Music Festival Youth Talent Competition, became a full-fledged member in 2008, at age 11.  Together, they imbue their music with a playful energy and soulfulness.  Their sound simultaneously evokes Ireland and Appalachia, old-time folk and timeless pop, with an orchestral fullness.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a much younger Mark Jones performing the song “Mountain Whippoorwill,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on Dr. Bill McNeil, the long time archivist at the Ozark Folk Center.  For thirty years, from 1975 until his untimely passing in 2005, Dr. Bill McNeil served as the Ozark Folk Center’s folklorist and all-purpose advisor on all things dealing with traditional Ozark culture.  During his tenure at the Folk Center, Bill McNeil guided the establishment of the Ozark Cultural Resource Center, an archival and teaching facility on the Folk Center’s grounds.  This installment focuses on Dr. McNeil’s attention to historical scholarship with regard to traditional music.

OHR064: OHR Presents: Autoharp Weekend 2016, 6/19/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Three world renowned autoharp virtuosos, Bryan Bowers, Karen Mueller, and Charles Whitmer perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of bluegrass legend Buck White performing the song “More Pretty Girls Than One.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Dr. Bill McNeil, the long time archivist at the Ozark Folk Center, in which Dr. McNeil discusses Ozark folk tales.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, three world renowned autoharp virtuosos, Bryan Bowers, Karen Mueller, and Charles Whitmer perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park’s annual “Autoharp Weekend.”  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of bluegrass legend Buck White performing the song “More Pretty Girls Than One.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Dr. Bill McNeil, the long time archivist at the Ozark Folk Center, in which Dr. McNeil discusses Ozark folk tales.

Bryan Bowers takes the auto harp to places not known to exist.  Sounds strange, but it’s true.  He possesses a powerful and soulful voice, and is a regular contributor to the Annual Auto Harp Weekend at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  From Washington State, Bowers became very popular with the audience of the comedy radio program The Dr. Demento Show with his 1980 recording of Mike Cross' song "The Scotsman.”  In 1993, Bowers was inducted into the Autoharp Hall of Fame whose membership includes Mother Maybelle Carter, Kilby Snow, and Sara Carter.

Karen Mueller is one of the top autoharp and mountain dulcimer players performing today. Her exciting and innovative performing style, featuring Appalachian, Celtic and contemporary music, has been applauded by critics and audiences from LA to Boston. Bluegrass Unlimited magazine has said "Karen Mueller's touch, timing and taste make her a true virtuoso. Her talent and clarity...deserve a wide audience.”

Charles Whitmer is a music educator and composer, as well as being an autoharp virtuoso.  He currently has 612 traditional songs in print arranged for autoharp for which he is known internationally.  In 2008 he was inducted into the Autoharp Hall of Fame.  He is a current staff member of The Autoharp Quarterly as a sheet music editor and was also a long time staff member for I.A.D. Publications, a former international quarterly magazine for autoharp enthusiasts.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of bluegrass legend Buck White of “The Whites” performing the song “More Pretty Girls Than One,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on Dr. Bill McNeil, the long time archivist at the Ozark Folk Center.  For thirty years, from 1975 until his untimely passing in 2005, Dr. Bill McNeil served as the Ozark Folk Center’s folklorist and all-purpose advisor on all things dealing with traditional Ozark culture.  During his tenure at the Folk Center, Bill McNeil guided the establishment of the Ozark Cultural Resource Center, an archival and teaching facility on the Folk Center’s grounds.  This installment examines Dr. McNeil’s take on Ozark folk tales.

OHR068: OHR Presents: Ramona Jones, 7/17/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Old time fiddler, composer, actress, singer, Grand Ole Opry star, and country music royalty Ramona Jones performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Ramona and her talented progeny. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Onis Morrison singing the traditional Ozark song “Dry & Dusty.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Ramona Jones through the lens of archivist Bill McNeil.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, old time fiddler, composer, actress, singer, Grand Ole Opry star, and country music royalty Ramona Jones performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Ramona and her talented progeny.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Onis Morrison singing the traditional Ozark song “Dry & Dusty.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Ramona Jones through the lens of archivist Bill McNeil.

Ramona Jones was a musician, actress, and composer known for Hee Haw (1969,) R.I.O.T.: The Movie (1996,) and He's So Fine (1993.)  Born Ramona Riggins in Indiana, Jones met her first husband, country entertainer Louis Marshall "Grandpa" Jones while both were working at Cincinnati radio station WLW.  They moved to Nashville in 1947. Grandpa Jones was a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame and a longtime Grand Ole Opry member.  They were married 52 years until his death in 1998.  A musician from a young age, Jones learned the fiddle from her father, then taught herself several other stringed instruments, competing in (and winning) several amateur contests during high school.  She made her solo debut on the Opry in 1947, and performed all over the world with Jones, including shows for service members on the front lines during the Korean War.  They later toured U.S. military bases in Italy, Austria, and Germany.  In the mid-Fifties, the couple regularly appeared on the Washington, D.C.-based TV series Town and Country Time.  She would go on to record numerous duets with her husband as well as a handful of solo singles for Monument Records, and albums that spotlighted her fiddle work.  From its 1969 debut — and for the next 25 years — the couple appeared on TV's Hee Haw.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Onis Morrison performing the traditional Ozark song “Dry & Dusty,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on Ramona Jones through the lens of legendary archivist Bill McNeil.

OHR006: OHR Presents: Wendy Colonna, 8/28/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Louisiana singer-songwriter Wendy Colonna performs live at the Ozark Folk Center in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Wendy, a performance from Robert Louis Cole, Brooks Blevins profiles folk song collector Oscar Gilbert, and Mark Jones' "Vault" segment features Fate Morrison.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Louisiana singer-songwriter Wendy Colonna performs live at the Ozark Folk Center.  Also, interviews with Wendy, a performance from Robert Louis Cole, Brooks Blevins profiles folk song collector Oscar Gilbert, and Mark Jones' "Vault" segment features Fate Morrison.

Wendy Colonna
hails from Louisiana and now makes her home in Austin, Texas.  Wendy has a style that combines many influences, most notably; blues and soul but most decidedly, real.

Robert Louis Cole lets it all go on stage.  He’s a no holds barred singer and musically on edge, which is good. A Denver native, one can’t help but hear the strong influence musicians like Tom Waits and bluesman Robert Johnson have had on him.

Brooks Blevins provides a native’s view of the people, music, and colorful events that shape the Ozark region. The author and historian presents a profile of Oscar Gilbert, husband of famed folk singer Ollie Gilbert, and an original Ozark folk musicologist.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment features a recording from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives of legendary Ozark fiddler Fate Morrison playing a traditional fiddle dance tune.

OHR072: OHR Presents: Spencer & Rains, 9/25/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Old time fiddling husband and wife duo “Spencer & Rains” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this fascinating duo. A performance from old time fiddle legend Dan Levenson, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of singer/songwriter Jimmy Connor performing his hit song “Grandma’s Featherbed.”

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, old time fiddling husband and wife duo “Spencer & Rains” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this fascinating duo.  A performance from old time fiddle legend Dan Levenson, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of singer/songwriter Jimmy Connor performing his hit song “Grandma’s Featherbed.”

Spencer & Rains combines the talents of two extraordinary traditional fiddlers, Kansas fiddler Tricia Spencer with Texas artist and fourth generation fiddler Howard Rains.  Together, the husband and wife duo Spencer & Rains have performed and taught nationally and internationally, preserving and building upon the traditions of their region.  The duo are known for their twin fiddle harmony, which is a product of the influence of midwestern Scandinavian fiddlers Tricia heard as a child.  At the same time, Howard’s distinct repertoire reintroduces listeners to the pre-contest styles of Texas fiddling.  That same sense of harmony is in their vocals as well, which they pull from all manner of American folk music.  Both multi-instrumentalists, they are steeped in tradition and are dedicated to the preservation, performance, and teaching of old time music.

A Southern Appalachian native, Dan Levenson was raised with old time music.  He has become a true master musician and teacher in both the Clawhammer Banjo style and Old Time Fiddling.  His dad called square dances and his mom played guitar, piano and sang.  With 14 Mel Bay publications including his innovative Clawhammer Banjo From Scratch and 10 recordings to his name, Dan is one of the undisputed influences on today’s old time music aficionados.  Dan Levenson is a modern day troubadour in the truest sense of the word.  A full time musician, he travels the country with banjo and fiddle, singing songs and telling stories of the road, his musical journey and his Southern Appalachian roots.  Dan is a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, but now makes his home in Tucson, Arizona year round, when he is not on the road.  His stage show, “An Evening with Dan Levenson" is an intimate evening of musical conversation that combines old time fiddle, Appalachian banjo, stories, and song in a storytelling format, celebrating life in rural Appalachia and life on the roads of America via the music of our country.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of singer/songwriter Jimmy Connor performing his hit song “Grandma’s Featherbed,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR048: OHR Presents: Suzy Bogguss , 10/23/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

World renowned country music recording artist Suzy Bogguss performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Suzy. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Onus Morrison demonstrating the traditional dance fiddle technique of playing with “fiddle sticks.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the first in a series of three Ozark regional ballads, “The Boy That Burned in the Berryville Jail.”

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, world renowned country music recording artist Suzy Bogguss performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Suzy.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Onus Morrison demonstrating the traditional dance fiddle technique of playing with “fiddle sticks.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the first in a series of three Ozark regional ballads, “The Boy That Burned in the Berryville Jail.”

Best known for her country music hits in the 80’s and 90’s, Suzy Bogguss is an old time musician and fan at heart.  Her 2011 release American Folk Songbook testified to this, and featured her versions of “Shenandoah, Banks of the Ohio, and Rock Island Line” among others.  Now enjoying her “post stardom” career, and taking things at a decidedly and much welcomed slower pace, we caught up with Suzy for a feature performance at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  And yes, there are a few of her hits from the 80’s and 90’s in for good measure.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Onus Morrison demonstrating the traditional dance fiddle technique of playing with “fiddle sticks,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins presents the first of three episodes on Ozark regional ballads.  This episode features a recording of “The Boy That Burned in the Berryville Jail,” also called “Floyd Eddings,” sung by Ed Alford of Delmar, Arkansas on January 3, 1960. The recording was made by University of Arkansas folklorist Mary Parler, and is preserved in the University of Arkansas Ozark Folk Collection.

OHR055: OHR Presents: David Holt & Josh Goforth, 11/13/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Grammy Award winning old time musician and TV personality David Holt performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Performing with David is his talented protégé Josh Goforth. Also, interviews with David & Josh. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Guyman Gammill singing a rare version of “White Dove.” Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Pete Howard.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Grammy Award winning old time musician and TV personality David Holt performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Performing with David is his talented protégé Josh Goforth.  Also, interviews with David & Josh.

In the early 1970’s David Holt made a journey to the rural Southeastern U.S. in search of the roots of American music.  What he discovered had a profound effect on him as a person and a musician.  Over the years David has been a sideman with Doc Watson, performed at the Grand Ole Opry, was a cast member on Hee Haw with Grandpa Jones, and even won a Grammy Award for his work with Doc Watson.  Today, David enjoys a successful solo career and performers regularly with a variety of other musicians.  For this show, David was joined by long- time friend and former protégé Josh Goforth .  The two met when Josh was in grade school, where David was performing for a group of students.  As fate would have it, they kept in touch and are now band mates all these years later.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Guyman Gammill singing a rare traditional song “White Dove,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Fine Fiddlers of the Ozarks,” old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Pete Howard.  This installment features modern recordings of the classic fiddle tunes “Fire on the Mountain, Natchez Under the Hill, and Bear Creek.”

OHR046: OHR Presents: The Vogts Sisters, 2/6/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Seraphic modern folk duo “the Vogts Sisters” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with the Vogts Sisters. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Arkansas native Uncle Floyd Holland, singing the song “Suzy Licked the Ladle.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the second in a series of three Ozark song catchers, John Quincy Wolf.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, seraphic modern folk duo “the Vogts Sisters” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with the Vogts Sisters.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Arkansas native Uncle Floyd Holland, singing the song “Suzy Licked the Ladle.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the second in a series of three Ozark song catchers, John Quincy Wolf.

With haunting harmonies and wickedly creative songs, the Vogts Sisters (Maggie and Abigail) are relative new comers to the old time/acoustic music scene. While they draw from traditional instrumentation (guitar/fiddle/mandolin) and source material, their song repertoire is mostly original and features themes of coming of age in small town America. Harmony singing among family members is always something special and unique; it’s a sound and feel that comes from familiarity and unspoken communication. The Vogts stand out in a crowded field of similar performers, with a fresh sound from America’s Heartland.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of beloved Stone County, Arkansas native Uncle Floyd Holland, singing the humorous folk song “Suzy Licked the Ladle.” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the second of three Ozark song catchers, John Quincy Wolf.  This episode features a recording of Owen Harvel performing the traditional song “Bad Companions” at Lunenburg, Arkansas on July 2, 1952. The recording was made by collectors John Quincy Wolf Jr. and his wife Bess, and is preserved by the Lyon College Regional Studies Center in its John Quincy Wolf Jr. Collection.

OHR014: OHR Presents: Ben Hall, 12/11/2017

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Award winning guitar prodigy Ben Hall performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Ben, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of original Ozark character Albert Sands.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, award winning guitar prodigy Ben Hall recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Ben, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of original Ozark character Albert Sands. 

Ben Hall is a Mississippi native who now makes his home, where so many musicians do, in Nashville, TN.  Ben is a former thumbpicking contest winner, and like Danny Dozier and Thom Bresh, is heavily influenced by Merle Travis.  Not one to seek out the life of a traveling or full time musician, Ben might be low key but he’s full throttle on the 6 string box.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and an enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on the philosophy of the Ozark Folk Center State Park Craft Village, and it’s mission to preserve the old Ozark ways.

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of original Ozark character Albert Sands  telling a short story about going to a traditional Ozark dance, from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR077: OHR Presents: The Keisler Brothers Band, 1/1/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Traditional bluegrass & Ozark legends The Keisler Brothers Band recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this talented band of brothers. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of harmonica virtuoso Lonnie Glosson performing “Mama, I Want a Drink of Water.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a brief history of white settlers to the Ozark region.

Ohr_logo_1_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, traditional bluegrass & Ozark legends The Keisler Brothers Band recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this talented band of brothers.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of harmonica virtuoso Lonnie Glosson performing “Mama, I Want a Drink of Water.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a brief history of white settlers to the Ozark region.

The Keisler Brothers Band is comprised of Redmond, Randy and Rick Keisler, as well as their long time friend Rodney Heslep.  This traditional bluegrass group has been bringing their fiery brand of acoustic music to American audiences for four decades.  Redmond Keisler, the leader of the group, plays Dobro, while his brothers Randy and Rick play bass & guitar, respectively.  The brothers’ long time compatriot Rodney Heslep brings the all important three finger banjo to round out a perfect traditional high energy bluegrass sound.  One of the Keisler Brothers’ specialties is their razor sharp harmony singing.  Family harmonies are breathtaking to behold, and this family has been perfecting theirs for decades.  True, honest, and decidedly down home, a Keisler Brothers show is a testament to their traditional bluegrass legacy.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of harmonica virtuoso Lonnie Glosson performing “Mama, I Want a Drink of Water,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on the history of early white settlers to the Ozark region, and their impact on the indigenous cultures of the area.

OHR Presents: Marty Stuart & The Fabulous Superlatives

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Five time Grammy Award winning traditional country, bluegrass, & Americana music legend Marty Stuart and his band, The Fabulous Superlatives, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Marty. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of himself & Marty Stuart performing the song “The Train That Carried My Girl From Town.”

Marty_stuart_pic_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, five time Grammy Award winning traditional country, bluegrass, & Americana music legend Marty Stuart and his band, The Fabulous Superlatives, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Marty.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of himself & Marty Stuart performing the song “The Train That Carried My Girl From Town.”

Marty Stuart is an American country music singer-songwriter & multi-instrumentalist, known for both his traditional style, and eclectic merging of rockabilly, honky tonk, and traditional country music.  As a musical child prodigy, Marty grew up playing with some of the greatest names in bluegrass & country music.  His early career saw him working with Lester Flatt, Vassar Clements, Doc Watson, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Porter Wagoner, and many others.  As an adult, Stuart launched a successful solo career that has spanned 30 years, and garnered five Grammy Awards.  He has appeared on numerous TV shows including Hee Haw, The Nashville Network, and his own show “The Marty Stuart Show.”  These days, he tours & records with his band “The Fabulous Superlatives,” featuring Kenny Vaughan on lead and acoustic guitar, Harry Stinson on drums and background vocals, and Chris Scruggs on electric, acoustic, steel and bass guitars, and background vocals.
https://www.martystuart.net

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1980 archival recording of himself & Marty Stuart performing the song “The Train That Carried My Girl From Town,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR Presents: Bruce Molsky’s Mountain Drifters

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Preeminent old time fiddler Bruce Molsky and his Molsky’s Mountain Drifters recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Moon Mullins performing the tune “Tiptoe Through the Tulips.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of the M&NA railroad of the Ozarks, featuring an original song & interview from Tom Simmons, the very first director of the Ozark Folk Center.

Bruce_molsky_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, preeminent old time fiddler Bruce Molsky and his Molsky’s Mountain Drifters recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Moon Mullins performing the tune “Tiptoe Through the Tulips.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of the M&NA railroad of the Ozarks, featuring an original song & interview from Tom Simmons, the very first director of the Ozark Folk Center.

Bruce Molsky is a self-described “street kid” from the Bronx who bailed on college and big city life for a cold-water cabin in Virginia in the 1970s.  His mission?   To soak up the passion that was dramatically upending his parent’s life plan for him  – authentic Appalachian mountain music – at the feet of its legendary pioneers, old masters who are now long gone.  Molsky’s Mountain Drifters also includes banjoist Allison de Groot and guitarist & singer Stash Wyslouch.
 
Today, Bruce Molsky is one of the most revered “multi-hyphenated career” ambassadors for America’s old-time mountain music.  For decades, he’s been a globetrotting performer and educator, a recording artist with an expansive discography including seven solo albums, well over a dozen collaborations and two Grammy-nominations. He’s also the classic “musician’s musician” – a man who’s received high praise from diverse fans and collaborators like Linda Ronstadt, Mark Knopfler, Celtic giants Donal Lunny and Andy Irvine, jazzer Bill Frisell and dobro master Jerry Douglas, a true country gentleman by way of the Big Apple aptly dubbed “the Rembrandt of Appalachian fiddlers” by virtuoso violinist and sometimes bandmate Darol Anger.
 
Molsky digs deep to transport audiences to another time and place, with his authentic feel for and the unearthing of almost-forgotten rarities from the Southern Appalachian songbook.  His foils are not only his well-regarded fiddle work, but banjo, guitar and his distinctly resonant vocals.  From tiny folk taverns in the British Isles to huge festival stages to his ongoing workshops at the renowned Berklee College of Music, Molsky seduces audiences with a combination of rhythmic and melodic virtuosity and relaxed conversational wit – a uniquely humanistic, downhome approach that can make Carnegie Hall feel like a front porch or parlor jam session.  - https://www.mountaindrifters.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Moon Mullins performing the tune “Tiptoe Through the Tulips,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode brings us a portrait of the M&NA railroad of the Ozarks, featuring an original song & interview from Tom Simmons, the very first director of the Ozark Folk Center.

OHR Presents: Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Celebrated Scottish & Oldtime acoustic music explorers Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this dynamic musical duo. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Roger Fountain performing the traditional fiddle tune “Bill Cheatham.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

Alasdair-natalie-251-highrescrop-by-irene-young_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, celebrated Scottish & Oldtime acoustic music explorers Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this dynamic musical duo.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Roger Fountain performing the traditional fiddle tune “Bill Cheatham.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

The musical partnership between consummate performer Alasdair Fraser, "the Michael Jordan of Scottish fiddling", and brilliant Californian cellist Natalie Haas spans the full spectrum between intimate chamber music and ecstatic dance energy. Over the last 18 years of creating a buzz at festivals and concert halls across the world, they have truly set the standard for fiddle and cello in traditional music. They continue to thrill audiences internationally with their virtuosic playing, their near-telepathic understanding and the joyful spontaneity and sheer physical presence of their music.

Fraser has a concert and recording career spanning over 30 years, with a long list of awards, accolades, radio and television credits, and feature performances on top movie soundtracks (Last of the Mohicans, Titanic, etc.). In 2011, he was inducted into the Scottish Traditional Music Hall of Fame. Haas, a graduate of the Juilliard School of Music, is one of the most sought after cellists in traditional music today. She has performed and recorded with a who's who of the fiddle world including Mark O'Connor, Natalie MacMaster, Irish supergroups Solas and Altan, Liz Carroll, Dirk Powell, Brittany Haas, Darol Anger, Jeremy Kittel, Hanneke Cassel, Laura Cortese, and many more.

This seemingly unlikely pairing of fiddle and cello is the fulfillment of a long-standing musical dream for Fraser. His search eventually led him to find a cellist who could help return the cello to its historical role at the rhythmic heart of Scottish dance music, where it stood for hundreds of years before being relegated to the orchestra. The duo's debut recording, Fire & Grace, won the coveted the Scots Trad Music "Album of the Year" award, the Scottish equivalent of a Grammy. Since its release, the two have gone on to record four more critically acclaimed albums that blend a profound understanding of the Scottish tradition with cutting-edge string explorations. In additional to performing, they both have motivated generations of string players through their teaching at fiddle camps across the globe.
https://alasdairandnatalie.com/bio

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Roger Fountain performing the traditional fiddle tune “Bill Cheatham,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.  The second of a three part series, this episode chronicles the development of an Ozark theme park based on the famous cartoon “Li’l Abner,” created by cartoonist Al Capp.

OHR Presents: Leyla McCalla

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

New York born Haitian-American classical & folk music sensation and former Carolina Chocolate Drops member Leyla McCalla recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Leyla. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original & hammered dulcimer legend Jay Round performing a medley of traditional Irish tunes. Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an introduction to Ozark geology, featuring an interview with Arkansas Geological Survey supervisor Angela Chandler.

Leyla_mccalla_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, New York born Haitian-American classical & folk music sensation and former Carolina Chocolate Drops member Leyla McCalla recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Leyla.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original & hammered dulcimer legend Jay Round performing a medley of traditional Irish tunes.  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an introduction to Ozark geology, featuring an interview with Arkansas Geological Survey supervisor Angela Chandler.

Leyla McCalla is a Haitian-American living in New Orleans, who sings in French, Haitian Creole and English, and plays cello, tenor banjo and guitar. Deeply influenced by traditional Creole, Cajun and Haitian music, as well as by American jazz and folk, her music is at once earthy, elegant, soulful and witty — it vibrates with three centuries of history, yet also feels strikingly fresh, distinctive and contemporary.  Violist Free Feral - Guitarist, banjoist, and triangle Daniel Tremblay

Leyla’s debut album, Vari-Colored Songs: A Tribute to Langston Hughes, was named 2013’s Album of the Year by the London Sunday Times and Songlines magazine, and received additional raves from a number of other publications, including the New York Times, Boston Globe and Offbeat, for its haunting mixture of music and message.  - https://leylamccalla.com

https://leylamccalla.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original & hammered dulcimer legend Jay Round performing a medley of traditional Irish tunes, from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode gives us an introduction to Ozark geology, featuring an interview with Arkansas Geological Survey supervisor Angela Chandler.

OHR Presents: “A.J. Croce: Two Generations of American Music”

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

American singer-songwriter and musical legacy A.J. Croce recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, hear A.J. speak of getting to know his famous musical father, Jim Croce, through his inherited collection of personal archival recordings. “A.J. Croce: Two Generations of American Music,” is a blend of A.J’s own soulful music, his father’s enduring hit songs, and some of the music that they shared as influences, together. It is a glimpse into the life of one of America’s greatest songwriters and his equally talented progeny.

Aj_croce_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, American singer-songwriter and musical legacy A.J. Croce recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Hear A.J. speak of getting to know his famous musical father, Jim Croce, through his inherited collection of personal archival recordings.  “A.J. Croce: Two Generations of American Music,” is a blend of A.J’s own soulful music, his father’s enduring hit songs, and some of the music that they shared as influences, together.  It is a glimpse into the life of one of America’s greatest songwriters and his equally talented progeny.

Adrian James "A.J." Croce is an American singer-songwriter. He is the son of singer-songwriters Jim Croce and Ingrid Croce. 

“According to Willie Nelson, “A.J. Croce has wisdom beyond his years. With his music, he represents his generation with a profound sense of honesty in his lyrics and quality in his delivery. The future of entertainment is safe in his hands!”   

Some artists are afforded the chance to tell their personal stories as they see fit, at a particular moment when they know the time has come. But for many, there is no choice — the story emerges hardwired to the music and they become forever identified with it no matter how their story may evolve or change.

A.J. Croce has been inextricably linked to a version of his own story by virtue of his name. He’s experienced a lifetime of comparisons to a father he lost at age two, whose music bears little resemblance to his own output yet still serves as a reference point despite the years that have passed and the many iconic mentors who have stepped in to offer their counsel, creativity, and endorsement throughout his long career.

It’s curious that it now feels necessary to include the reference, as enough time has passed that a new generation of tastemakers and journalists might not know who Jim Croce was — that he was a golden-voiced everyman, a singer-songwriter-guitarist who died too soon, leaving one of pop music’s most beautiful and memorable ballads (written about a young A.J.) in his wake.

Croce the younger, on the other hand, is a piano man, first and foremost, and a vocal stylist second. His muted growl pulls from a host of American traditions and anti-heroes — it’s part New Orleans, part juke joint, part soul, but somehow evokes New York, a continuum where John Lurie meets Lou Reed. He is further a songwriter, driven by a personal muse, informed by a life on a boomerang of tragedy.”
-https://www.ajcrocemusic.com

OHR Presents: Hubby Jenkins

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Country Blues & Oldtime music phenomenon and Carolina Chocolate Drops member Hubby Jenkins recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Hubby. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bess & Lester Kelley performing the Carter Family song “All the Good Times are Past & Gone.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

Hubby_jenkins_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Country Blues & Oldtime music phenomenon and Carolina Chocolate Drops member Hubby Jenkins recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with Hubby.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bess & Lester Kelley performing the Carter Family song “All the Good Times are Past & Gone.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

Hubby Jenkins is a talented multi-instrumentalist, who endeavors to share his love and knowledge of old-time American music.  Born and raised in Brooklyn, he delved into his Southern roots, following the thread of African American history that wove itself through country blues, ragtime, fiddle and banjo, and traditional jazz.  Hubby got his higher musical education started as a busker.  He developed his guitar and vocal craft on the sidewalks and subway platforms of New York City, performing material by those venerable artists whose work he was quickly absorbing.  An ambitiously itinerant musician, he took his show on the road, playing the streets, coffee shops, bars, and house parties of cities around the U.S.  After years of busking around the country and making a name for himself, Hubby became acquainted with the Carolina Chocolate Drops.  Since 2010 he has been an integral part of the Grammy award winning Carolina Chocolate Drops and continues to make solo performances.
http://www.hubbyjenkins.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bess & Lester Kelley performing the Carter Family song “All the Good Times are Past & Gone,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.  The first of a three part series, this episode chronicles the early years of an Ozark theme park based on the famous cartoon “Li’l Abner,” created by cartoonist Al Capp.

OHR Presents: The Savoy Family Cajun Band

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Distinguished traditional Louisiana Cajun music connoisseurs The Savoy Family Cajun Band recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with renowned fiddler Joel Savoy. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Ervin & Lily Freeze performing the tune “Let Those Brown Eyes Smile at Me.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Blanchard Springs National Park, featuring an interview with long time U.S. Forest Service visitor information specialist Tony Guinn.

Savoy_family_cajun_band_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, distinguished traditional Louisiana Cajun music connoisseurs The Savoy Family Cajun Band recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with renowned fiddler Joel Savoy.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Ervin & Lily Freeze performing the song “Let Those Brown Eyes Smile at Me.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Blanchard Springs National Park, featuring an interview with long time U.S. Forest Service visitor information specialist Tony Guinn.

The Savoy Family Cajun Band consists of father Marc, mother Ann, and brothers Joel & Wilson Savoy. 

Marc Savoy was born and raised in the small Cajun prairie town of Eunice, Louisiana. Drawing inspiration from 'bals de maison' (house dances) in his father's outdoor kitchen, Savoy obtained his first accordion and began playing it at the age of 12.  Playing the instrument led to repairing it and after disassembling enough accordions he began to build them.  Playing the accordion has always been a natural part of his life from the dancehall to the home.  The musicians with whom he has played Cajun music read like a who’s who of the finest in Cajun music, from the Balfa Brothers, DL Menard, Doc Guidry to early fiddle masters Dennis McGee and Wade Fruge. 

Ann Allen Savoy is a musician, photographer, record producer, and writer.  Her destiny was sealed when she began to listen to rare collections of Cajun 78’s. She met her future husband, acclaimed accordion builder/musician Marc Savoy, and after their marriage she began documenting the Cajun culture, taking photographs, interviewing important musicians, and transcribing the Cajun French songs. Her documentation ultimately became a book, Cajun Music: A Reflection of a People Volume 1, which won the prestigious Botkin book award from the American Folklore Society. An avid photographer since high school, her photos have been exhibited at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and at the Festival of American Music in Eugene, Oregon.

Joel Savoy is one of the most requested fiddlers in SW Louisiana today.  Joel grew up in Eunice, Louisiana, literally at the feet of Cajun heros like Dennis McGee, Dewey Balfa, Michael Doucet, and Wade Frugé.  In 2006 Joel founded Valcour Records.  He’s worked and played with Linda Ronstadt,T-Bone Burnett, Steve Buckingham, Allison Krauss, Linda Ronstadt, Steve Miller, Tim O’Brien, Darol Angor and many more.  Joel also builds accordions with his father, makes electric guitars and hi-end tube amps and studio gear, and is an excellent recording engineer.

Wilson Savoy, the youngest son of Marc and Ann, has made music since before he could walk.  He began playing boogie-woogie and blues piano, inspired by Louisiana native Jerry Lee Lewis, at the age of 10.  Wilson took up the accordion after graduating from high school.  His major influences are his father, Amede Ardoin, and Iry Lejeune.  Besides being a musician he is an avid filmmaker, and has produced films of many of the finest bands in SW Louisiana.  (www.almenafilms.com)  When he isn’t making and producing music videos and short biographies he is traveling with his three times Grammy nominated dynamic young band, the Pine Leaf Boys.  - http://www.savoyfamilycajunband.com/index.html

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Ervin & Lily Freeze performing the song “Let Those Brown Eyes Smile at Me,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode brings us a portrait of Blanchard Springs National Park, featuring an interview with long time U.S. Forest Service visitor information specialist Tony Guinn.

OHR Presents: The Paul Brock Band

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

World renowned Irish button accordion & melodeon player Paul Brock & his band recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this master of Irish traditional music. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Ulys Pilcher performing the traditional tune “Sally Goodin.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of the Little Red River of the Ozarks, featuring interviews with Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Stream Fisheries Biologist Jeff Quinn & Angela Chandler, Arkansas Geological Survey supervising geologist.

Paul_brock_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, world renowned Irish button accordion & melodeon player Paul Brock & his band recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this master of Irish traditional music.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Ulys Pilcher performing the traditional tune “Sally Goodin.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of the Little Red River of the Ozarks, featuring interviews with Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Stream Fisheries Biologist Jeff Quinn & Angela Chandler, Arkansas Geological Survey supervising geologist.

Button accordion and melodeon player Paul Brock is a multiple All-Ireland champion from Athlone, County Westmeath now residing in Ennis, County Clare.  Brock’s solo album, Mo Charidin (Gael-Linn), was described by the Rough Guide to Irish Music as “a masterpiece of accordion playin.”  Brock co-founded Brock McGuire Band in 2000 with fiddle player Manus McGuire.  The band has gone on to record a number of highly acclaimed albums including Green Grass Blue Grass, a collaboration with 14-time GRAMMY Award winner Ricky Skaggs celebrating the connection between Appalachian and Irish music.  In 2014, the band performed a fully-scored program of their music with the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra in Jackson, Mississippi.

As a soloist, Brock has toured extensively internationally.  He has performed with leading musicians and has been a special guest artist on a number of occasions with acclaimed Irish band The Chieftains.  In 1989, Brock and McGuire co-founded Moving Cloud, with whom he recorded two award winning albums for Green Linnet Records.  Brock’s 2006 collaboration with Enda Scahill, Humdinger (Compass Records), was voted “Irish Music Album of the Year” by The Irish Times and “Instrumental Album of the Year” by The Irish American News.  Brock’s many album credits include A Tribute to Joe Cooley (Gael-Linn) with fiddler Frankie Gavin. -  https://paulbrockband.com

For this performance, Paul Brock is joined by famed Irish composer & teacher Denis Carey, multi-instrumentalist, singer, and dancer Dave Curley, and also multi-instrumentalist Shane Farrell.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Ulys Pilcher performing the traditional tune “Sally Goodin,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode brings us a portrait of the Little Red River of the Ozarks, featuring interviews with Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Stream Fisheries Biologist Jeff Quinn and Angela Chandler, Arkansas Geological Survey supervising geologist.

OHR Presents: The Jason Roberts Band

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Two time Grammy Award winning Texas Swing fiddler and Asleep at the Wheel member Jason Roberts & the Jason Roberts Band recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Jason. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of four Ozark originals; Buddy Lancaster, Tom Simmons, Jackie Stewart, and of course Mark Jones performing “Bile Them Cabbage Down.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a profile of the Shawnee residents of the Ozark region.

Jason_roberts_2_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, two time Grammy Award winning Texas Swing fiddler and Asleep at the Wheel member Jason Roberts & the Jason Roberts Band recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Jason.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of four Ozark originals; Buddy Lancaster, Tom Simmons, Jackie Stewart, and of course Mark Jones performing “Bile Them Cabbage Down.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a profile of the Shawnee residents of the Ozark region.

Grammy Award winning fiddle player Jason Roberts brings his signature style to the Jason Roberts Band.
Having spent his childhood among legends in Texas honky-tonks -- and then nearly 20 years with the world-famous band Asleep at the Wheel -- Jason has soaked up the very best of Western Swing and brings his own signature style to this traditional American genre.  Two Grammy Awards and four individual Hall of Fame inductions later, Jason and his Jason Roberts Band delight fans around the world.

Music is a family thing in the Roberts clan.  Jason’s grandfather, Buck Roberts, a fellow Texas Western Swing Hall of Famer, toured nationally with The Roberts Brothers Rhthymaires in the 1940’s and 50’s.  A 12-year-old Jason eventually fronted a band with his grandfather and other Rhthymaires’ veterans.  From the other side, Jason’s grandmother played swing piano well past her 100th birthday.  Jason learned to play on his grandfather Carl’s fiddle, an instrument that’s on stage with him to this day.

Legendary fiddler Johnny Gimble (Jason’s kin by marriage) took notice of young Jason's remarkable natural talent and took him under his wing.  Jason has said, “Every good lick I know, I stole from Johnny Gimble.”  By the time he was 15, Jason had played with greats like Gimble, Leon Rausch, Bobby Boatwright, Herb Remington, and other members of Bob Wills’ Texas Playboys.

From the White House to The David Letterman Show and the Kennedy Center to Bob Wills’ hometown of Turkey, Texas, Jason has helped keep the spirit of Western Swing alive across generations.  His fiddle magic and endearing personality make him a fan favorite everywhere he plays.
https://www.jasonrobertsband.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of four Ozark originals; Buddy Lancaster, Tom Simmons, Jackie Stewart, and of course Mark Jones performing “Bile Them Cabbage Down,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on the history of the Shawnee Indian inhabitants of the Ozark region.

OHR Presents: The Barefoot Movement

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

This week, high energy Neo-Grass acoustic music phenomenon The Barefoot Movement recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park. Also, interviews with The Barefoot Movement vocalist & co-founder Noah Wall. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Brooke Breeding performing the traditional tune “Tying the Leaves.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of the White river of the Ozarks, featuring interviews with Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Stream Fisheries Biologist Jeff Quinn and historian & folklorist Dr. George Lankford.

Barefoot_movement_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, high energy Neo-Grass acoustic music phenomenon The Barefoot Movement recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with The Barefoot Movement vocalist & co-founder Noah Wall.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Brooke Breeding performing the traditional tune “Tying the Leaves.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of the White river of the Ozarks, featuring interviews with Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Stream Fisheries Biologist Jeff Quinn and historian & folklorist Dr. George Lankford.

Heartfelt, energetic, and down home. Heralded by CMT Edge as "one of the most promising bands on the bluegrass scene," the music of the Nashville based group The Barefoot Movement is as down to earth as their intention for members of their audience: sit back, relax, take your shoes off, and stay a while. All the worries and frustrations of the world melt away as this charming, acoustic band takes listeners back to a simpler place and time. Whether you're seeking emotional ballads or rip-roaring barn-burners, you can expect a collection of music that offers something for everyone. With two full length albums, an EP of traditional music, several cross-country tours, and appearances at some of the top bluegrass festivals in the United States already under their belt, the possibilities for this act are endless. The group has enjoyed almost non-stop touring including a trip to Burkina Faso, Africa where they were guests of the American Embassy, and in September of 2014, they received a Momentum Award, naming them "Band of the Year" by the International Bluegrass Music Association.

Their show is as fun to watch as it is to hear.  The smiles on the faces of the band are obvious displays of the joy and excitement they feel when performing and the audience shares in the fun. With effortlessly executed transitions, the pacing between the softer and more vigorous numbers constantly has fans on the edge of their seats.

The "movement" can be traced back to the teen years of singer-songwriter and fiddler Noah Wall, of Oxford, NC. Just as she had begun penning her first compositions, she met mandolinist Tommy Norris their senior year of high school. Convinced of their musical chemistry and driven by mutual ambition, they continued to build the band from the ground up throughout their college careers. While Tommy studied classical music and recording engineering at Western Carolina University, Noah chose East Tennessee State, particularly for their Bluegrass, Old-time and Country Music Program. Here she began to shape her musical identity, under the tutelage of ETSU's renown staff, and found an instrumental home in old time fiddling. With the addition of versatile guitarist and singer Alex Conerly of Hattiesburg, MS in 2013, and most recently, Katie Blomarz of Frankfort, IL on the upright bass, the lineup was complete with all the elements that make up the Barefoot sound: lush harmonies, thoughtful instrumentation, and memorable melodies.

It has now been seven years since The Barefoot Movement took off their shoes and took to the stage. Hard work and talent have taken them from east coast to west, from north to south, and even across the Atlantic Ocean. They have appeared in Country Weekly Magazine, RollingStone.com, CMT Edge, Music City Roots, and Woodsongs Old-Time Radio Hour. Their original music was featured on the Outdoor Channel's program "Huntin' the World: Southern Style" and their music video for their popular song "Second Time Around" has been seen nationally on the Zuus Country Network. They have been selected as showcase artists at both the International Bluegrass Music Association and the Americana Festival conferences and were first runners up at the 2013 Telluride Bluegrass Festival's New Band Competition.
- http://www.thebarefootmovementofficial.com/bio/  

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Brooke Breeding performing the traditional tune “Tying the Leaves,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode brings us a portrait of the White river of the Ozarks, featuring interviews with Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Stream Fisheries Biologist Jeff Quinn and historian & folklorist Dr. George Lankford.

OHR Presents: Jayme Stone & The Lomax Project

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Neo-folk & progressive bluegrass sensation Jayme Stone & The Lomax Project recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Jayme about his music and the ambitious Lomax Project. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Mona Fay Moody performing the traditional song “I Will Never Marry.”

Jayme_stone_moira_smiley_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, neo-folk, Americana, and progressive bluegrass sensation Jayme Stone & The Lomax Project recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Jayme about his music and the ambitious Lomax Project.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Mona Fay Moody performing the traditional song “I Will Never Marry.”

Two-time Juno-winning banjoist, composer and instigator Jayme Stone makes music inspired by sounds from around the world—bridging folk, jazz, and chamber music.  His award-winning albums both defy and honor the banjo’s long role in the world’s music, turning historical connections into compelling sounds.  Stone is the consummate collaborator, unearthing musical artifacts and magnetizing extraordinary artists to help rekindle these understudied sounds. He is a passionate educator, producer, and instigator.

Jayme Stone’s Lomax Project focuses on songs collected by folklorist and field recording pioneer Alan Lomax.  This collaboration brings together distinctive and creative roots musicians to revive, recycle and reimagine traditional music.  The repertoire includes Bahamian sea shanties, Sea Island spirituals, Appalachian ballads, fiddle tunes and work songs collected from both well-known musicians and everyday folk:  sea captains, cowhands, fishermen, prisoners and homemakers.  Collaborators on this particular live show include Moira Smiley and Tristan Clarridge.

Moira Smiley is a singer & composer who creates and performs new work for voices.  A musical polyglot, and vocal shape-shifter, her voice – and composing – are heard on feature films, BBC & PBS television programs, NPR, and on more than 60 albums.  When she’s not leading her own group, Moira Smiley & VOCO, Moira tours with Indie artist tUnE-yArDs, Irish music powerhouse, Solas, The Lomax Project and Billy Child’s “Laura Nyro Re-Imagined.”  Recent solo performances include TED, Stravinsky’s ‘Les Noces,’ the London Proms Festival, features on BBC3’s The Choir, and ABC Australia’s Books & Arts programs. Moira’s recordings feature spare, vocally driven collections of warped traditional songs, original polyphony and body percussion.  In addition to her performing work, she is in high demand as a choral clinician, composer and arranger.

Multi-instrumentalist Tristan Clarridge is a 5-time Grand National Fiddle Champion and a pioneering cellist, synthesizing traditional folk influences with rhythmic vocabulary from jazz, rock and pop music, and leading a revolution among adventurous young cellists throughout the country.  He has toured the world with bluegrass/nu-folk sensation Crooked Still and Darol Anger’s Republic of Strings, as well as Mike Marshall, Bruce Molsky and Cape Breton fiddle phenomenon Natalie MacMaster.  Tristan’s latest collaboration, “The Bee Eaters,” features his talented sister Tashina Clarridge as well as hammered dulcimer wizard Simon Chrisman.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Mona Fay Moody performing the traditional song “I Will Never Marry,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR Presents: Darol Anger & Mike Marshall

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Oldtime, bluegrass, and psychograss pioneers Darol Anger & Mike Marshall recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these legendary instrumentalists. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bob & Kay Blair performing the traditional song “Red Green.”

Darol_anger_mike_marshall_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, oldtime, bluegrass, and psychograss pioneers Darol Anger & Mike Marshall recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these legendary instrumentalists.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bob & Kay Blair performing the traditional song “Red Green.”

Fiddler, composer, producer and educator,  Darol Anger is at home in a number of musical genres, some of which he helped to invent.  Exceptional among modern fiddlers for his versatility and depth, Anger has helped drive the evolution of the contemporary string band through his involvement with numerous pathbreaking ensembles such as his Republic Of Strings, the Turtle Island String Quartet, the David Grisman Quintet, Montreux, his Duo with Mike Marshall, and others.  He has performed and taught all over the world with musicians such as Dr. Billy Taylor, Bela Fleck, Bill Evans, Edgar Meyer, Bill Frisell, David Grisman, Tony Rice, Tim O’Brien, The Anonymous 4, Marin Alsop and the Cabrillo Orchestra, the Detroit Symphony, Mark O’Connor, and Stephane Grappelli.  Today Darol can be heard on NPR’s “Car Talk” theme every week, along with Earl Scruggs, David Grisman and Tony Rice. He was also the violinist on the phenomenally popular Sim City computer games.  In addition to performing all over the world, he has recorded and produced scores of important recordings since 1977, is a MacDowell and UCross Fellow, and has received numerous composers’ residencies and grants. He has been a featured soloist on dozens of recordings and motion picture soundtracks.  He is an Associate Professor at the Berklee School of music.  He recently began an ambitious online Fiddle School at ArtistWorks.com.  His website is www.darolanger.com

Mike Marshall made his Carnegie Hall debut at the age of 20 with jazz violin legend Stephane Grappelli as a member of the David Grisman Quartet. In 1985 he would perform in that famed hall with his own classical ensemble The Modern Mandolin Quartet in 1985.  Mike has been at the forefront of New Acoustic music for over 40 years having been the founding member of many groups including the Montreux Band, Psychograss, Choro Famoso and The Anger Marshall Band.  He is indeed a living compendium of musical styles and has the ability to seamlessly blend his American roots background with a deep understanding of European classical music, Brazilian choro and other world music.  Mike is a fluid Jazz improviser and a master on mandolin, guitar, mandocello and violin.  Between 1999 and 2003 Mike collaborated with Joshua Bell, Edgar Meyer, Bela Fleck and Sam Bush on two separate projects.  These groups toured the U.S.A. extensively and performed at the Aspen Music Festival, San Francisco Performances and Chamber Music at Lincoln Center, NY.  Both ensembles were nominated for Grammy Awards for their Sony Classical releases.  In 2014 Mike was nominated for his third Grammy Award for his recording with the Turtle Island Quartet.  Currently Mike is touring with German mandolin virtuoso Caterina Lichtenberg.  The two have released two cds on the Adventure Music label and have performed at the Carmel Bach Festival, The Savannah Music Festival, the Bach Haus Liepzig, Germany and the Rockygrass Bluegrass Festival in Colorado and have been soloists with the New Century Orchestra under Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, and Orchester l’arte del mondo from Cologne, Germany.  Mike’s past duet projects have included tours and Cds with mandolinists Chris Thile, violinist Darol Anger, bassist Edgar Meyer, Brazilian Mandolinist Hamilton de Holanda and pianists Jovino Santos Neto and Andy Narell. His recordings can be found on the Windham Hill, Sony Classical, Rounder, Sugar Hill and Compass labels as well his own Adventure Music label.  As a music educator Mike is committed to passing on his knowledge through a variety of channels. He currently directs the Mike Marshall School of Mandolin through the ArtistWorks on-line educational company where he is teaching hundreds of mandolinists from around the world. He has published six books on mandolin technique and has produced three video instruction DVDs.  Mike splits his time currently between his home in San Francisco, CA and Wuppertal, Germany where his wife, Caterina Lichtenberg  holds the position of mandolin professor at the Cologne Music  Conservatory.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bob & Kay Blair performing the traditional song “Red Green,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR Presents: Anna & Elizabeth

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Prodigious purveyors of the past, multi-instrumentalists, singers and story tellers, Anna & Elizabeth perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these unique performers. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals The Hall Family singing the traditional song “Cowboy’s Dream.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of world famous cowboy poet & singer Glenn Orhlin.

Anna___elizabeth_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, prodigious purveyors of the past, multi-instrumentalists, singers and story tellers, Anna & Elizabeth perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these unique performers.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals The Hall Family, performing the traditional song “Cowboy’s Dream.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of world famous cowboy poet & singer Glenn Orhlin.

The collaboration between Anna & Elizabeth spans worlds — between their homes in Brooklyn and rural Virginia -- between deep study of mountain ballads with old masters and explorations into the avant garde — between music, performance, and visual art.  Anna & Elizabeth have performed across the country and in Europe.  Highlights include: The Newport Folk Festival; NPR's Tiny Desk Concert; The Chicago Folk Festival; The High Museum of Modern Art (Atlanta); and the Cambridge Folk Festival (UK.)  Their work has been featured on BBC Radio 2 and BBC3's Late Junction, Vice’s Noisey, the Huffington Post, and No Depression. They have shared the stage with Alice Gerrard, Mick Moloney, Sam Lee and Riley Baugus, Bruce Greene, Abigail Washburn, Wayne Henderson, and also National Heritage Award winners Sheila Kay Adams and Billy McComiskey.

Elizabeth Laprelle lives on a farm in Rural Retreat, Virginia, where she grew up, and  has pursued her interest in mountain ballads for over a decade.  Since the release of her debut album at age 16, she’s been hailed as one of the most dedicated students of the traditional unaccompanied style of her generation.  The student of master singer Ginny Hawker and National Heritage Fellow Sheila Kay Adams, Elizabeth was the first recipient of the Henry Reed Award from the Library of Congress at age 16, and won the 2012 Mike Seeger Award at Folk Alliance International.  She has released three solo ballad albums, and was called “the best young Appalachian ballad singer to emerge in recent memory” by UK’s fRoots Magazine.

Anna Roberts-Gevalt is a voracious and curious multi-instrumentalist originally from Vermont, described by Meredith Monk as a "radiant being."  She fell in love with the sound of banjo in college, moved to the mountains, and learned with master musicians in Kentucky, Virginia, and North Carolina, becoming a blue-ribbon fiddler and banjo player (WV State Folk Fest, Kentucky Fiddle Contest.)  She was a fellow at the Berea College Archive, a 2014 OneBeat fellow (Bang on a Can's Found Sound Nation,) artistic director of Kentucky’s traditional music institute, the Cowan Creek Mountain Music School, and curator of Baltimore's Crankie Festival.  She has recently delved into new musical worlds, including recent work with composers Brian Harnetty, Nate May and Cleek Schrey, Matmos, David Rothenberg, Susan Alcorn, and saxophonist Jarrett Gilgore.  She has contributed writing to No Depression and The Old Time Herald.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals The Hall Family, performing the traditional song “Cowboy’s Dream,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on world renowned cowboy poet, balladeer, and story teller Glenn Orhlin.

OHR Presents: Dom Flemons

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Grammy award winning Oldtime singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist Dom Flemons, accompanied by the versatile Brian Farrow, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this Grammy award winning artist. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of country music royalty Jeanette Carter performing the classic song “Foggy Mountain Top.”

Dom_flemons_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Grammy award winning Oldtime singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist Dom Flemons, accompanied by the versatile Brian Farrow, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this Grammy award winning artist.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of country music royalty Jeanette Carter performing the classic song “Foggy Mountain Top.”

Raised in Phoenix, Arizona, Dom Flemons’ involvement with music began by playing percussion in his high school band.  After picking up the guitar and harmonica as a teenager, he began to play in local coffee houses and became a regular performer on the Arizona folk music scene.  Dom wrote his own songs and produced 25 albums of singer-songwriters and slam poets in the Phoenix area, including six albums of his own during this time.  He took a brief break from playing music in order to pursue slam poetry (he majored in English at Northern Arizona University) and performed in two national poetry slams in 2002 and 2003.  Aside from exploring slam poetry, he spent his early adulthood listening to records and discovering a love of folk music, blues, jazz, jug band music, country music and ‘50s rock ‘n’ roll.  Dom became interested in folk musicians such as Phil Ochs, Dave Van Ronk, and Mike Seeger, as well as musicians such as Mississippi John Hurt, Howlin’ Wolf, Hank Williams, Chuck Berry and Carl Perkins.  After stepping away from the slam poetry scene, he rekindled his interest in music, this time focusing on the old-time blues music of the pre-WWII era.

A multi-instrumentalist, Dom Flemons plays banjo, guitar, harmonica, fife, bones, bass drum, snare drum, and quills, in addition to singing.  He says that he incorporates his background in percussion to his banjo playing.  Dom’s banjo repertoire includes not only clawhammer but also tenor and three-finger styles of playing.  He first picked up the instrument when he borrowed a five-string banjo from a friend who had removed the instrument’s fifth string.  As a founding member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, an African-American string band, Dom was able to explore his interest in bringing traditional music to new audiences.  The band won a GRAMMY for its 2011 album Genuine Negro Jig and was nominated for its most recent album, Leaving Eden, in 2012.

Dom says he would like to use the traditional forms of music he has heard and immersed himself in over the years to create new soundscapes that generate interest in old-time folk music.  Focusing very much on creating music that is rooted in history but taking a contemporary approach, Dom hopes to reexamine what traditional music can become.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of country music royalty Jeanette Carter performing the classic song “Foggy Mountain Top,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR Presents: Jerron ‘Blind Boy’ Paxton

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Old time blues, jazz, & traditional music prodigy Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Jerron. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark legend Bookmiller Shannon performing the song “The Banks of the Ohio.” Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles traditional Ozark fiddler Absie Morrison.

Jerron_paxton_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, old time blues, jazz, & traditional music prodigy Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with Jerron.

Jerron "Blind Boy" Paxton is an American musician from Los Angeles.  A vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, Paxton's style draws from blues and jazz music before World War II and was influenced by Fats Waller and "Blind" Lemon Jefferson.  According to Will Friedwald in the Wall Street Journal, Paxton is "virtually the only music-maker of his generation—playing guitar, banjo, piano and violin, among other implements—to fully assimilate the blues idiom of the 1920s and '30s, the blues of Bessie Smith and Lonnie Johnson.”

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark legend Bookmiller Shannon performing the traditional murder ballad “The Banks of the Ohio,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Fine Fiddlers of the Ozarks,” old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles traditional Ozark fiddler Absie Morrison.  This installment features archival recordings of the traditional Ozark fiddle tunes “Dry & Dusty, The Concord March, and The Ozark Waltz.”

OHR095: OHR Presents: The Gordons, 5/7/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Inimitable Illinois husband & wife acoustic duo “The Gordons” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these matrimonial music mavens. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Lonnie Finnley performing the traditional tune “Vienna Waltz.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates the history of elk in the early Ozark region.

The_gordons_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, inimitable Illinois husband & wife acoustic duo The Gordons recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State.  Also, interviews with these matrimonial music mavens.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Lonnie Finnley performing the traditional tune “Vienna Waltz.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates the history of elk in the early Ozark region.

“The Gordons” – Gary and Roberta.  Influenced by the great music of their era, this husband and wife duo were baptized by bluegrass music and have made wonderful folk music ever since.  Accompanied by Gary’s tasteful Gallagher guitar and dobro, Roberta plays the American born Appalachian autoharp.  With many recordings to their credit since 1976, harmony singing is their signature.
http://www.thegordonsmusic.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Lonnie Finnley performing the traditional tune “Vienna Walts,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates the history of elk in the early Ozark regions of Arkansas & Missouri.

OHR Presents: Muriel Anderson

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

World renowned finger style and harp guitar phenom Muriel Anderson performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile authentic Ozark balladeer Almeda Riddle, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Grand Old Opry and Hee Haw star Grandpa Jones.

Muriel_anderson_1_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, world renowned finger style and harp guitar phenom Muriel Andersen performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile authentic Ozark balladeer Almeda Riddle, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Grand Old Opry and Hee Haw star Grandpa Jones.

Muriel Anderson is a former National Thumbpicking Guitar Champion, a fine 6 string picker, and practitioner of the many stringed harp guitar.  Creating a sound like no other, the harp guitar incorporates a multitude of strings that cover a wide sonic range.  The result can be both ethereal and otherworldly, or just downright mind blowing.  Muriel’s repertoire includes traditional folk music, world music, and original compositions.

Prolific folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode offers a profile of authentic Ozark balladeer Almeda Riddle, and features an archival recording of Almeda singing the traditional ballad “Will the Weaver.”

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Grand Old Opry and “Hee Haw” star Grandpa Jones performing his song “Mountain Dew,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR Presents: Thom Bresh

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Thumbpicking guitar legacy Thom Bresh, son of legendary guitarist Merle Travis, performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of Ozark folk musician Greg Moody.

Thom_bresh_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments carry listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

On this week’s show, thumb picking guitar legacy Thom Bresh, son of legendary guitarist Merle Travis, performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of Ozark folk musician Greg Moody.

Thom Bresh has led an incredible, multi-faceted life in the entertainment business.  To start, his birth father is guitar royalty, Merle Travis.  Thom was raised in California during the golden age of television and worked as a stuntman/actor during his youth.  He went on to become one of the premier practitioners of his fathers “thumbpicking” style of guitar.  Harnessing a quick wit and an equally quick set of ten fingers, there is nothing like a Thom Bresh performance.  Seriously.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and an enduring legacy of music and craft.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of Greg Moody singing the traditional folk song “Going Down This Road Feeling Bad,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR Presents: The Steel Wheels

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Shenandoah Valley Virginia progressive folk roots band “The Steel Wheels” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with the band, and Mark Jones “From the Vault” segment features an archival recording of Ozark original Doug Ward, performing the traditional song “The Fox.”

Steel_wheels_sandlin_gaither_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Shenandoah Valley, Virginia progressive folk roots band “The Steel Wheels” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with the band, and Mark Jones “From the Vault” segment.

The Steel Wheels are a four piece acoustic band that combines the instrumentation and song structure of traditional Old Time music with a modern sensibility and drive.  Performing together since 2010, The Steel Wheels hail from the rich musical grounds of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia.  The band sponsors and organizes an annual music festival, held in the lush Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, called the “Red Wing Roots Music Festival.”

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Ozark original Doug Ward performing the traditional song “The Fox,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR Presents: Riders in the Sky

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Grammy Award winning cowboy quartet “Riders in the Sky” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bud & Karen Bell.

Riders_in_the_sky_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Grammy Award winning cowboy quartet “Riders in the Sky” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bud & Karen Bell.

For over 30 years, “Riders in the Sky” have kept the “cowboy way” of music alive, performing traditional songs from Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, and other classic Western music artists.  They are two-time Grammy Award winners, boasting exceptional musicianship across the board.  For this program, the band was performing show number 6,235.  There are a lot of ways to crunch those numbers, but that would essentially amount to over 17 years of successive shows.  That is some real staying power.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bud & Karen Bell performing the song “Cannonball Blues,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR Presents: Jimmy Driftwood

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Legendary songwriter, performer, folklorist, and historian Jimmy Driftwood performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Dave Smith gives an historical portrait of the life of this remarkable Ozarker. Also, Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith and producer Jeff Glover discuss the fine points of what makes “folk music,” and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of another Ozark original, Jean Simmons, performing the song “Unclouded Day,” in her pioneering mountain dulcimer style.

Jimmy_driftwood_j_gerald_crawford_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, legendary songwriter, performer, folklorist, and historian Jimmy Driftwood performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Dave Smith gives an historical portrait of the life of this remarkable Ozarker.  Also, Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith and producer Jeff Glover discuss the fine points of what makes “folk music,” and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of another Ozark original, Jean Simmons, performing the song “Unclouded Day,” in her pioneering mountain dulcimer style.

There was never a more popular, outspoken or controversial musician or personality to come out of Stone County, Arkansas than James Corbitt Morris (better known as Jimmy Driftwood).  Driftwood was a driving force behind the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and a successful singer songwriter who penned “The Battle of New Orleans” and “Tennessee Stud” among other notable songs. Jimmy helped put Stone County on the musical map and left a legacy that is still talked about to this day. Our program this week features special and seldom heard songs from some of Jimmy’s archival OFCSP performances.

Ozark Highlands Radio host Dave Smith and producer Jeff Glover discuss the fine points of what makes “folk music,” drawing from interviews & perspectives of various folk musicians.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Ozark original Jean Simmons, performing in her pioneering mountain dulcimer style the song “Unclouded Day,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR Presents: Don Edwards

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Consummate cowboy balladeer and Grammy nominated performer Don Edwards performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Don. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Jesse Wright, singing the classic Jimmy Rodgers song “The Orphan Child.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the second in a series of three Ozark regional ballads, “Lee Mills.”

Don_edwards_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, consummate cowboy balladeer and Grammy nominated performer Don Edwards performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Don.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Jesse Wright, singing the classic Jimmy Rodgers song “The Orphan Child.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the second in a series of three Ozark regional ballads, “Lee Mills.”

One of America’s best loved and most enduring cowboy singers, Don Edwards is indeed an American treasure.  His love and passion for traditional cowboy songs is second to none and has earned him a fan base worldwide.  He knows the songs, the stories, and even some of the old trails that made the old West famous.  Accompanied by his trusty guitar, Don takes us on a trip back in time when cowboy singers and songs echoed through the trails, taverns, and cattle drive camps of yesterday.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of the mysterious Jesse Wright, singing the classic Jimmy Rodgers song “The Orphan Child,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins presents the second of three episodes on Ozark regional ballads.  This episode features a recording of the traditional Ozark ballad “Lee Mills,” sung by husband and wife Berry and Clementine Sutterfield of Marshall, Arkansas on August 1, 1963. The recording was made by folklorist John Quincy Wolf, and is preserved in Lyon College’s “John Quincy Wolf Collection.”
http://web.lyon.edu/wolfcollection/songs/sutterfieldlee1279.mp3

OHR081: OHR Presents: The Barefoot Movement, 7/2/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

High energy Neo-Grass acoustic music phenomenon The Barefoot Movement recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with The Barefoot Movement vocalist & co-founder Noah Wall. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Brooke Breeding performing the traditional tune “Tying the Leaves.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of the White river of the Ozarks, featuring interviews with Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Stream Fisheries Biologist Jeff Quinn and historian & folklorist Dr. George Lankford.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, high energy Neo-Grass acoustic music phenomenon The Barefoot Movement recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with The Barefoot Movement vocalist & co-founder Noah Wall.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Brooke Breeding performing the traditional tune “Tying the Leaves.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of the White river of the Ozarks, featuring interviews with Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Stream Fisheries Biologist Jeff Quinn and historian & folklorist Dr. George Lankford.

Heartfelt, energetic, and down home. Heralded by CMT Edge as "one of the most promising bands on the bluegrass scene," the music of the Nashville based group The Barefoot Movement is as down to earth as their intention for members of their audience: sit back, relax, take your shoes off, and stay a while. All the worries and frustrations of the world melt away as this charming, acoustic band takes listeners back to a simpler place and time. Whether you're seeking emotional ballads or rip-roaring barn-burners, you can expect a collection of music that offers something for everyone. With two full length albums, an EP of traditional music, several cross-country tours, and appearances at some of the top bluegrass festivals in the United States already under their belt, the possibilities for this act are endless. The group has enjoyed almost non-stop touring including a trip to Burkina Faso, Africa where they were guests of the American Embassy, and in September of 2014, they received a Momentum Award, naming them "Band of the Year" by the International Bluegrass Music Association.

Their show is as fun to watch as it is to hear.  The smiles on the faces of the band are obvious displays of the joy and excitement they feel when performing and the audience shares in the fun. With effortlessly executed transitions, the pacing between the softer and more vigorous numbers constantly has fans on the edge of their seats.

The "movement" can be traced back to the teen years of singer-songwriter and fiddler Noah Wall, of Oxford, NC. Just as she had begun penning her first compositions, she met mandolinist Tommy Norris their senior year of high school. Convinced of their musical chemistry and driven by mutual ambition, they continued to build the band from the ground up throughout their college careers. While Tommy studied classical music and recording engineering at Western Carolina University, Noah chose East Tennessee State, particularly for their Bluegrass, Old-time and Country Music Program. Here she began to shape her musical identity, under the tutelage of ETSU's renown staff, and found an instrumental home in old time fiddling. With the addition of versatile guitarist and singer Alex Conerly of Hattiesburg, MS in 2013, and most recently, Katie Blomarz of Frankfort, IL on the upright bass, the lineup was complete with all the elements that make up the Barefoot sound: lush harmonies, thoughtful instrumentation, and memorable melodies.

It has now been seven years since The Barefoot Movement took off their shoes and took to the stage. Hard work and talent have taken them from east coast to west, from north to south, and even across the Atlantic Ocean. They have appeared in Country Weekly Magazine, RollingStone.com, CMT Edge, Music City Roots, and Woodsongs Old-Time Radio Hour. Their original music was featured on the Outdoor Channel's program "Huntin' the World: Southern Style" and their music video for their popular song "Second Time Around" has been seen nationally on the Zuus Country Network. They have been selected as showcase artists at both the International Bluegrass Music Association and the Americana Festival conferences and were first runners up at the 2013 Telluride Bluegrass Festival's New Band Competition.

- http://www.thebarefootmovementofficial.com/bio/  

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Brooke Breeding performing the traditional tune “Tying the Leaves,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode brings us a portrait of the White river of the Ozarks, featuring interviews with Arkansas Game and Fish Commission Stream Fisheries Biologist Jeff Quinn and historian & folklorist Dr. George Lankford.

OHR100: OHR Presents: Willi Carlisle & Carolyn Carter, 7/23/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Award winning actor, playwright, singer-songwriter, and traditional Ozark folk musician Willi Carlisle, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this dynamic talent. In addition, a featured performance by Arkansas True Folk singer-songwriter Carolyn Carter. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of guitar designer, builder, & player Stu Mossman performing the traditional tune “Red Haired Boy.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater relates legendary folk singer Jean Ritchie’s childhood experience of meeting her mysterious “Uncle Jason.”

Willi_carlisle_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, award winning actor, playwright, singer-songwriter, and traditional Ozark folk musician Willi Carlisle, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this dynamic talent.  In addition, a featured performance by Arkansas True Folk singer-songwriter Carolyn Carter.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of guitar designer, builder, & player Stu Mossman performing the traditional tune “Red Haired Boy.”  Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater relates legendary folk singer Jean Ritchie’s childhood experience of meeting her mysterious “Uncle Jason.”

Willi Carlisle is, according to The Washington Post, "powerful...both down-home and brainy."  With years of collecting folklore, playing or calling square dances, and working in the avant-garde, Willi Carlisle Goehring is a multi-faceted writer, performer, and instrumentalist.
 
With a style forged in the fire of Ozark oldtime music and his ever-growing collection of antique music, Carlisle’s musical stories hoot, stomp, and saunter through joys and troubles uniquely southern and timelessly true.  Equally comfortable on banjo, fiddle, and guitar, Carlisle has earned accolades for his versatility with performances at the Ozark Folk Center, the Fayetteville Roots Festival, Thacker Mountain Radio, and Fringe Festivals across the country, where he has been lauded with awards like "Best Show" (Orlando Fringe) and the "Meryl Streep Acting Award" (Portfringe).
 
While his big frame and expressive voice draw comparison to old balladeers and bluesmen, Willi sings new songs for the oldest reasons: love, heartache, and joy. People who watch and listen will find that he laughs and sheds a tear onstage almost as often as his audiences do, fire- and-brimstone proof of larger-than-life songs and stories. - http://www.willicarlisle.com

Carolyn Carter is a Stone Country, Arkansas native and a regular performer at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Carolyn is a gifted songwriter and singer, whose talents are now becoming apparent to a larger audience, outside of Arkansas.  Blessed with a songbird’s voice, Carolyn’s original compositions can be both haunting and heartwarming, reflecting her experiences growing up in the Ozarks.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1979 archival recording of guitar designer, builder, & player Stu Mossman performing the traditional tune “Red Haired Boy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater relates legendary folk singer Jean Ritchie’s childhood experience of meeting her mysterious “Uncle Jason,” from whom she learns of her own family’s music and history.

OHR083: OHR Presents: Antsy McClain & Muriel Anderson, 8/6/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Celebrated singer/songwriter & hometown humorist Antsy McClain with world renowned harp-guitarist Muriel Anderson recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Antsy & Muriel. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Robert & Mary Gillihan performing the traditional song “Banks of the Ohio.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of the White River Line railroad of the Ozarks, featuring an interview with George Lankford, professor emeritus at Lyon College in Batesville.

Antsy_mcclain_1_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, celebrated singer/songwriter & hometown humorist Antsy McClain with world renowned harp-guitarist Muriel Anderson recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Antsy & Muriel.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Robert & Mary Gillihan performing the traditional song “Banks of the Ohio.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of the White River Line railroad of the Ozarks, featuring an interview with George Lankford, professor emeritus at Lyon College in Batesville.

Antsy McClain brings his unique blend of music and “humor with heart” to the stage, combining his original songs with a hilarious slide show, including Antsy’s own life observations, social commentary and imaginary sponsors from his home town trailer park of Pine View Heights.  As a master storyteller with the likes of PBS, NPR and TEDTalks under his belt, Antsy includes humorous and serious songs in his shows. Songs such as “One Less Trailer Here in Pine View Heights,” My Baby Whistles When She Walks,” and “The Junk Drawer of Your Heart,” are keenly humorous observations about love and loss, while his more serious songs, like “Field Trip,” “I’m Everyone,” or “Falling in Love in America,” are more akin to personal journal entries written in the act of living.  It’s this tightrope walk between humor and heart that makes Antsy McClain a true original. 
- http://unhitched.com/antsys-bio/

One of the world’s foremost fingerstyle guitarists and harp-guitarists, Muriel Anderson is the first woman to have won the National Fingerstyle Guitar Championship.  Her CD “Nightlight Daylight” was chosen as one of the top 10 CDs of the decade by Guitar Player Magazine her “Heartstrings” recording accompanied the astronauts on the space shuttle Discovery.  She has performed/recorded with Chet Atkins, Les Paul, Victor Wooten and the Nashville Chamber Orchestra.  Her obvious joy of music, humor and her facility across the genres of folk, classical, jazz, bluegrass and international music is revered by guitarists worldwide.  An engaging performer, Muriel’s unique approach to the instrument virtually transforms the guitar into a lyrical choir, then a marching band, then a Japanese koto, then a Bluegrass band, one minute launching into a Beatles’ tune and the next, a Rodrigo concerto. Her video “Why Worry” has garnered a total of over 8 million views. Muriel is host of the renowned Muriel Anderson’s ALL STAR GUITAR NIGHT® and founder of the MUSIC FOR LIFE ALLIANCE charity.
- http://murielanderson.com/press/bio/

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Robert & Mary Gillihan performing the traditional song “Banks of the Ohio,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode brings us a portrait of the White River Line railroad of the Ozarks, featuring interviews with George Lankford, professor emeritus at Lyon College in Batesville.

OHR025: OHR Presents: Malcolm Holcombe, 8/13/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

North Carolina insurgent country folk singer/songwriter Malcolm Holcombe performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile legendary banjo ingenue Lily Mae Ledford, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of original Ozark dulcimer master craftsman Lynn McSpadden.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, North Carolina insurgent country folk singer/songwriter Malcolm Holcombe performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile legendary banjo ingenue Lily Mae Ledford, and Mark Jones offers an archival recording of original Ozark dulcimer master craftsman Lynn McSpadden.

Malcolm Holcombe may not be a household name to music fans, and that probably suits him just fine.  Among his peers however, he’s respected and revered.  Holcombe has shared the stage with Merle Haggard, Richard Thompson, John Hammond, Leon Russell, Wilco and Shelby Lynne.  Though his instrumentation is nothing new to the singer/songwriter genre (guitar and vocals), Malcolm sets himself apart with honest and touching songs, arranged and crafted from his unique perspective.  Malcolm is joined by longtime collaborator Jared Tyler on various stringed instruments and vocals.

Renowned folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode profiles legendary banjo ingenue Lily Mae Ledford.

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of original Ozark dulcimer master craftsman Lynn McSpadden, performing the traditional tune “Castle Grand,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR084: OHR Presents: Molsky's Mountain Drifters, 9/3/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Preeminent old time fiddler Bruce Molsky and his Molsky’s Mountain Drifters recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Moon Mullins performing the tune “Tiptoe Through the Tulips.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of the M&NA railroad of the Ozarks, featuring an original song & interview from Tom Simmons, the very first director of the Ozark Folk Center.

Bruce_molsky_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, preeminent old time fiddler Bruce Molsky and his Molsky’s Mountain Drifters recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Moon Mullins performing the tune “Tiptoe Through the Tulips.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of the M&NA railroad of the Ozarks, featuring an original song & interview from Tom Simmons, the very first director of the Ozark Folk Center.

Bruce Molsky is a self-described “street kid” from the Bronx who bailed on college and big city life for a cold-water cabin in Virginia in the 1970s.  His mission?   To soak up the passion that was dramatically upending his parent’s life plan for him  – authentic Appalachian mountain music – at the feet of its legendary pioneers, old masters who are now long gone.  Molsky’s Mountain Drifters also includes banjoist Allison de Groot and guitarist & singer Stash Wyslouch.
 
Today, Bruce Molsky is one of the most revered “multi-hyphenated career” ambassadors for America’s old-time mountain music.  For decades, he’s been a globetrotting performer and educator, a recording artist with an expansive discography including seven solo albums, well over a dozen collaborations and two Grammy-nominations. He’s also the classic “musician’s musician” – a man who’s received high praise from diverse fans and collaborators like Linda Ronstadt, Mark Knopfler, Celtic giants Donal Lunny and Andy Irvine, jazzer Bill Frisell and dobro master Jerry Douglas, a true country gentleman by way of the Big Apple aptly dubbed “the Rembrandt of Appalachian fiddlers” by virtuoso violinist and sometimes bandmate Darol Anger.
 
Molsky digs deep to transport audiences to another time and place, with his authentic feel for and the unearthing of almost-forgotten rarities from the Southern Appalachian songbook.  His foils are not only his well-regarded fiddle work, but banjo, guitar and his distinctly resonant vocals.  From tiny folk taverns in the British Isles to huge festival stages to his ongoing workshops at the renowned Berklee College of Music, Molsky seduces audiences with a combination of rhythmic and melodic virtuosity and relaxed conversational wit – a uniquely humanistic, downhome approach that can make Carnegie Hall feel like a front porch or parlor jam session.  - https://www.mountaindrifters.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Moon Mullins performing the tune “Tiptoe Through the Tulips,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode brings us a portrait of the M&NA railroad of the Ozarks, featuring an original song & interview from Tom Simmons, the very first director of the Ozark Folk Center.

OHR086: OHR Presents: The Savoy Family Cajun Band, 9/10/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Distinguished traditional Louisiana Cajun music connoisseurs The Savoy Family Cajun Band recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with renowned fiddler Joel Savoy. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Ervin & Lily Freeze performing the tune “Let Those Brown Eyes Smile at Me.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Blanchard Springs National Park, featuring an interview with long time U.S. Forest Service visitor information specialist Tony Guinn.

Savoy_family_cajun_band_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, distinguished traditional Louisiana Cajun music connoisseurs The Savoy Family Cajun Band recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with renowned fiddler Joel Savoy.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Ervin & Lily Freeze performing the song “Let Those Brown Eyes Smile at Me.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of Blanchard Springs National Park, featuring an interview with long time U.S. Forest Service visitor information specialist Tony Guinn.

The Savoy Family Cajun Band consists of father Marc, mother Ann, and brothers Joel & Wilson Savoy. 

Marc Savoy was born and raised in the small Cajun prairie town of Eunice, Louisiana. Drawing inspiration from 'bals de maison' (house dances) in his father's outdoor kitchen, Savoy obtained his first accordion and began playing it at the age of 12.  Playing the instrument led to repairing it and after disassembling enough accordions he began to build them.  Playing the accordion has always been a natural part of his life from the dancehall to the home.  The musicians with whom he has played Cajun music read like a who’s who of the finest in Cajun music, from the Balfa Brothers, DL Menard, Doc Guidry to early fiddle masters Dennis McGee and Wade Fruge. 

Ann Allen Savoy is a musician, photographer, record producer, and writer.  Her destiny was sealed when she began to listen to rare collections of Cajun 78’s. She met her future husband, acclaimed accordion builder/musician Marc Savoy, and after their marriage she began documenting the Cajun culture, taking photographs, interviewing important musicians, and transcribing the Cajun French songs. Her documentation ultimately became a book, Cajun Music: A Reflection of a People Volume 1, which won the prestigious Botkin book award from the American Folklore Society. An avid photographer since high school, her photos have been exhibited at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and at the Festival of American Music in Eugene, Oregon.

Joel Savoy is one of the most requested fiddlers in SW Louisiana today.  Joel grew up in Eunice, Louisiana, literally at the feet of Cajun heros like Dennis McGee, Dewey Balfa, Michael Doucet, and Wade Frugé.  In 2006 Joel founded Valcour Records.  He’s worked and played with Linda Ronstadt,T-Bone Burnett, Steve Buckingham, Allison Krauss, Linda Ronstadt, Steve Miller, Tim O’Brien, Darol Angor and many more.  Joel also builds accordions with his father, makes electric guitars and hi-end tube amps and studio gear, and is an excellent recording engineer.

Wilson Savoy, the youngest son of Marc and Ann, has made music since before he could walk.  He began playing boogie-woogie and blues piano, inspired by Louisiana native Jerry Lee Lewis, at the age of 10.  Wilson took up the accordion after graduating from high school.  His major influences are his father, Amede Ardoin, and Iry Lejeune.  Besides being a musician he is an avid filmmaker, and has produced films of many of the finest bands in SW Louisiana.  (www.almenafilms.com)  When he isn’t making and producing music videos and short biographies he is traveling with his three times Grammy nominated dynamic young band, the Pine Leaf Boys.  - http://www.savoyfamilycajunband.com/index.html

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Ervin & Lily Freeze performing the song “Let Those Brown Eyes Smile at Me,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode brings us a portrait of Blanchard Springs National Park, featuring an interview with long time U.S. Forest Service visitor information specialist Tony Guinn.

OHR087: OHR Presents: Hubby Jenkins, 9/24/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Country Blues & Oldtime music phenomenon and Carolina Chocolate Drops member Hubby Jenkins recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Hubby. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bess & Lester Kelley performing the Carter Family song “All the Good Times are Past & Gone.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

Hubby_jenkins_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Country Blues & Oldtime music phenomenon and Carolina Chocolate Drops member Hubby Jenkins  recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with Hubby.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bess & Lester Kelley performing the Carter Family song “All the Good Times are Past & Gone.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

Hubby Jenkins is a talented multi-instrumentalist, who endeavors to share his love and knowledge of old-time American music.  Born and raised in Brooklyn, he delved into his Southern roots, following the thread of African American history that wove itself through country blues, ragtime, fiddle and banjo, and traditional jazz.  Hubby got his higher musical education started as a busker.  He developed his guitar and vocal craft on the sidewalks and subway platforms of New York City, performing material by those venerable artists whose work he was quickly absorbing.  An ambitiously itinerant musician, he took his show on the road, playing the streets, coffee shops, bars, and house parties of cities around the U.S.  After years of busking around the country and making a name for himself, Hubby became acquainted with the Carolina Chocolate Drops.  Since 2010 he has been an integral part of the Grammy award winning Carolina Chocolate Drops and continues to make solo performances.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bess & Lester Kelley performing the Carter Family song “All the Good Times are Past & Gone,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.  The first of a three part series, this episode chronicles the early years of an Ozark theme park based on the famous cartoon “Li’l Abner,” created by cartoonist Al Capp.

OHR Presents: The Buffalo Gals

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Award winning Neo-Bluegrass & Americana acoustic singer-songwriter duo The Buffalo Gals recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these incredibly talented Buffalo Gals. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Kenny Sims performing the traditional song “Butcher’s Boy.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

Buffalo_gals_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, award winning Neo-Bluegrass & Americana acoustic singer-songwriter duo The Buffalo Gals recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these incredibly talented Buffalo Gals.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Kenny Sims performing the traditional song “Butcher’s Boy.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

The Arkansas duo Buffalo Gals is comprised of Melissa Carper on vocals, upright bass & guitar and Rebecca Patek on vocals, fiddle & guitar.  Both women being extraordinary songwriters as well as accomplished musicians, they bring to the stage a range of stories and down home feeling that’ll have your toes tapping and your heart yearning.  Blending a classic Country music & Americana sound with a bit of humor and a decidedly modern sensibility, the Buffalo Gals’ music is at once authentic as well as intimately relatable.  Rebecca Patek’s most recent album “Come up and Meet Me” was named Best Bluegrass Album for 2016, by the Independent Music Association.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Kenny Sims performing the traditional song “Butcher’s Boy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.  The last of a three part series, this episode chronicles the chaotic downfall of an Ozark theme park based on the famous cartoon “Li’l Abner,” created by cartoonist Al Capp.

OHR088: OHR Presents: Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas, 10/8/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Celebrated Scottish & Oldtime acoustic music explorers Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this dynamic musical duo. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Roger Fountain performing the traditional fiddle tune “Bill Cheatham.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

Alasdair-natalie-251-highrescrop-by-irene-young_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, celebrated Scottish & Oldtime acoustic music explorers Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Haas recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this dynamic musical duo.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Roger Fountain performing the traditional fiddle tune “Bill Cheatham.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

The musical partnership between consummate performer Alasdair Fraser, "the Michael Jordan of Scottish fiddling", and brilliant Californian cellist Natalie Haas spans the full spectrum between intimate chamber music and ecstatic dance energy. Over the last 18 years of creating a buzz at festivals and concert halls across the world, they have truly set the standard for fiddle and cello in traditional music. They continue to thrill audiences internationally with their virtuosic playing, their near-telepathic understanding and the joyful spontaneity and sheer physical presence of their music.

Fraser has a concert and recording career spanning over 30 years, with a long list of awards, accolades, radio and television credits, and feature performances on top movie soundtracks (Last of the Mohicans, Titanic, etc.). In 2011, he was inducted into the Scottish Traditional Music Hall of Fame. Haas, a graduate of the Juilliard School of Music, is one of the most sought after cellists in traditional music today. She has performed and recorded with a who's who of the fiddle world including Mark O'Connor, Natalie MacMaster, Irish supergroups Solas and Altan, Liz Carroll, Dirk Powell, Brittany Haas, Darol Anger, Jeremy Kittel, Hanneke Cassel, Laura Cortese, and many more.

This seemingly unlikely pairing of fiddle and cello is the fulfillment of a long-standing musical dream for Fraser. His search eventually led him to find a cellist who could help return the cello to its historical role at the rhythmic heart of Scottish dance music, where it stood for hundreds of years before being relegated to the orchestra. The duo's debut recording, Fire & Grace, won the coveted the Scots Trad Music "Album of the Year" award, the Scottish equivalent of a Grammy. Since its release, the two have gone on to record four more critically acclaimed albums that blend a profound understanding of the Scottish tradition with cutting-edge string explorations. In additional to performing, they both have motivated generations of string players through their teaching at fiddle camps across the globe.
https://alasdairandnatalie.com/bio

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Roger Fountain performing the traditional fiddle tune “Bill Cheatham,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.  The second of a three part series, this episode chronicles the development of an Ozark theme park based on the famous cartoon “Li’l Abner,” created by cartoonist Al Capp.

OHR089: OHR Presents: The Buffalo Gals, 10/15/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Award winning Neo-Bluegrass & Americana acoustic singer-songwriter duo The Buffalo Gals recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these incredibly talented Buffalo Gals. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Kenny Sims performing the traditional song “Butcher’s Boy.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

Buffalo_gals_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, award winning Neo-Bluegrass & Americana acoustic singer-songwriter duo The Buffalo Gals recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these incredibly talented Buffalo Gals.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Kenny Sims performing the traditional song “Butcher’s Boy.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.

The Arkansas duo Buffalo Gals is comprised of Melissa Carper on vocals, upright bass & guitar and Rebecca Patek on vocals, fiddle & guitar.  Both women being extraordinary songwriters as well as accomplished musicians, they bring to the stage a range of stories and down home feeling that’ll have your toes tapping and your heart yearning.  Blending a classic Country music & Americana sound with a bit of humor and a decidedly modern sensibility, the Buffalo Gals’ music is at once authentic as well as intimately relatable.  Rebecca Patek’s most recent album “Come up and Meet Me” was named Best Bluegrass Album for 2016, by the Independent Music Association.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Kenny Sims performing the traditional song “Butcher’s Boy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious history of Dogpatch USA, a unique theme park in the Ozarks for 25 years.  The last of a three part series, this episode chronicles the chaotic downfall of an Ozark theme park based on the famous cartoon “Li’l Abner,” created by cartoonist Al Capp.

OHR092: OHR Presents: The April Verch Band, 11/12/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Canadian Ottawa Valley fiddler, singer, and stepdancer April Verch recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with April. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Tim & Dennis Crouch performing the tune “Dill Pickle Rag.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s experience in the early Ozark region.

April_verch_prx_cr-parker_j_pfister_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Canadian Ottawa Valley fiddler, singer, and stepdancer April Verch recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with April.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Tim & Dennis Crouch performing the tune “Dill Pickle Rag.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s experience in the early Ozark region.

Fiddler, singer, and stepdancer April Verch knows how relevant an old tune can be.  She was raised surrounded by living, breathing roots music—her father’s country band rehearsing; the lively music at church and at community dances; the tunes she rocked out to win fiddle competitions.  She thought every little girl learned to stepdance at the age of three and fiddle at the age of six.  She knew nothing else and decided early on that she wanted to be a professional musician.  She took that leap, and for over two decades has been recording and captivating audiences worldwide, exploring new and nuanced places each step of the way.

While Verch is perhaps best known for playing traditional fiddle styles from her native Ottawa Valley, Canada, her performances extend into old-time American and Appalachian styles and far beyond, for a well-rounded tour-de-force of North Americana sounds.  Verch and her fellow trio members pare down their arrangements, highlighting the simple pleasures of upright bass, guitar, clawhammer banjo, voices, fiddle, and stepping in intimate conversation.  At the heart lie Verch’s delicate voice, energetic footwork, and stunning playing.  Sometimes she sings, steps and fiddles all at once with apparent ease and precision.  Verch is – as they say – a triple threat in performance, her live show a beautiful companion to her music: versatile, robust, and masterfully executed.
http://aprilverch.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Tim & Dennis Crouch performing the tune “Dill Pickle Rag,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s harrowing experiences in the early Ozark regions of Arkansas & Missouri.

OHR093: OHR Presents: The Down Hill Strugglers, 11/19/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Brooklyn, New York based old-time string band The Down Hill Strugglers recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this fantastic folk trio. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman performing the traditional tune “Shoutin’ On the Hills.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s experience in the early Ozark region.

Down_hill_strugglers_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Brooklyn, New York based old-time string band The Down Hill Strugglers recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this fantastic folk trio.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman performing the traditional tune “Shoutin’ On the Hills.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s experience in the early Ozark region.

The Down Hill Strugglers is a string band composed of Eli Smith, Walker Shepard and Jackson Lynch, who play at various times; fiddle, banjo, guitar, mandolin and harmonica.  Forming in 2008, they are influenced by the music that came out of rural America, including Appalachian traditions, music from the Deep South, and the Western States.  They combine the feeling of the old music that can be heard on commercially recorded 78 RPM records (largely of the pre-WWII era) and field recordings made throughout the 20th century.  They have been playing together for five years and have performed at the Newport Folk Festival, the Kennedy Center, the Library of Congress, the Brooklyn Folk Festival and many other places.  In 2013 they were featured on the soundtrack to the Coen Brothers film, "Inside Llewyn Davis" produced by T-Bone Burnett.
- http://downhillstrugglers.blogspot.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman performing the traditional tune “Shoutin’ On the Hills,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s harrowing experiences in the early Ozark regions of Arkansas & Missouri.

OHR094: OHR Presents: The Purple Hulls, 11/26/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Talented twin Texan bluegrass and gospel duo The Purple Hulls recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these identical virtuosos. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Donnie Dutton performing the traditional tune “Wildwood Flower.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s experience in the early Ozark region.

Purple_hulls_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, talented twin Texan bluegrass and gospel duo The Purple Hulls recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these identical virtuosos.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Donnie Dutton performing the traditional tune “Wildwood Flower.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s experience in the early Ozark region.

You could easily say these two musicians were born to make music together. Identical twins Katy Lou and Penny Lea Clark of The Purple Hulls were raised on a working family farm in the deep piney woods of East Texas, but that didn’t stop the Texans from finding their way to the hills of Tennessee, specifically Music City, where they began touring with various country artists and writing songs for Nashville’s largest publishing company, Sony Tree.  The Purple Hulls are no stranger to road life and are now blazing the trail as a dynamic sister duo, showcasing their unique sibling harmonies while ripping the strings off any instrument they can get their hands on. If you’re looking for authentic acoustic driven music delivered at its best, your search is over.
https://thepurplehulls.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman performing the traditional tune “Shoutin’ On the Hills,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s harrowing experiences in the early Ozark regions of Arkansas & Missouri.

OHR Presents: Frank Fairfield & Zac Sokolow

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

California based multi-instrumentalists, singers, and purveyors of traditional Southwestern American folk music Frank Fairfield & Zac Sokolow recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Frank & Zac. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Frank Ellis performing the tune “Shamus O’Brien.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of The Meadowcreek Project, a sustainable agriculture & education facility located in the Ozarks.

Frank_fairfield_prx_pic_small California based multi-instrumentalists, singers, and purveyors of traditional Southwestern American folk music Frank Fairfield & Zac Sokolow recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Frank & Zac. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Frank Ellis performing the tune “Shamus O’Brien.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of The Meadowcreek Project, a sustainable agriculture & education facility located in the Ozarks.

OHR Presents: The Down Hill Strugglers

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Brooklyn, New York based old-time string band The Down Hill Strugglers recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this fantastic folk trio. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman performing the traditional tune “Shoutin’ On the Hills.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s experience in the early Ozark region.

Down_hill_strugglers_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Brooklyn, New York based old-time string band The Down Hill Strugglers recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this fantastic folk trio.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman performing the traditional tune “Shoutin’ On the Hills.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s experience in the early Ozark region.

The Down Hill Strugglers is a string band composed of Eli Smith, Walker Shepard and Jackson Lynch, who play at various times; fiddle, banjo, guitar, mandolin and harmonica.  Forming in 2008, they are influenced by the music that came out of rural America, including Appalachian traditions, music from the Deep South, and the Western States.  They combine the feeling of the old music that can be heard on commercially recorded 78 RPM records (largely of the pre-WWII era) and field recordings made throughout the 20th century.  They have been playing together for five years and have performed at the Newport Folk Festival, the Kennedy Center, the Library of Congress, the Brooklyn Folk Festival and many other places.  In 2013 they were featured on the soundtrack to the Coen Brothers film, "Inside Llewyn Davis" produced by T-Bone Burnett.
- http://downhillstrugglers.blogspot.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman performing the traditional tune “Shoutin’ On the Hills,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s harrowing experiences in the early Ozark regions of Arkansas & Missouri.

OHR Presents: The April Verch Band

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Canadian Ottawa Valley fiddler, singer, and stepdancer April Verch recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with April. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Tim & Dennis Crouch performing the tune “Dill Pickle Rag.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s experience in the early Ozark region.

April_verch_prx_cr-parker_j_pfister_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Canadian Ottawa Valley fiddler, singer, and stepdancer April Verch recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with April.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Tim & Dennis Crouch performing the tune “Dill Pickle Rag.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s experience in the early Ozark region.

Fiddler, singer, and stepdancer April Verch knows how relevant an old tune can be.  She was raised surrounded by living, breathing roots music—her father’s country band rehearsing; the lively music at church and at community dances; the tunes she rocked out to win fiddle competitions.  She thought every little girl learned to stepdance at the age of three and fiddle at the age of six.  She knew nothing else and decided early on that she wanted to be a professional musician.  She took that leap, and for over two decades has been recording and captivating audiences worldwide, exploring new and nuanced places each step of the way.

While Verch is perhaps best known for playing traditional fiddle styles from her native Ottawa Valley, Canada, her performances extend into old-time American and Appalachian styles and far beyond, for a well-rounded tour-de-force of North Americana sounds.  Verch and her fellow trio members pare down their arrangements, highlighting the simple pleasures of upright bass, guitar, clawhammer banjo, voices, fiddle, and stepping in intimate conversation.  At the heart lie Verch’s delicate voice, energetic footwork, and stunning playing.  Sometimes she sings, steps and fiddles all at once with apparent ease and precision.  Verch is – as they say – a triple threat in performance, her live show a beautiful companion to her music: versatile, robust, and masterfully executed.  - http://aprilverch.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Tim & Dennis Crouch performing the tune “Dill Pickle Rag,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s harrowing experiences in the early Ozark regions of Arkansas & Missouri.

OHR Presents: The Purple Hulls

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Talented twin Texan bluegrass and gospel duo The Purple Hulls recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these identical virtuosos. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Donnie Dutton performing the traditional tune “Wildwood Flower.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s experience in the early Ozark region.

Purple_hulls_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, talented twin Texan bluegrass and gospel duo The Purple Hulls recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these identical virtuosos.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Donnie Dutton performing the traditional tune “Wildwood Flower.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s experience in the early Ozark region.

You could easily say these two musicians were born to make music together. Identical twins Katy Lou and Penny Lea Clark of The Purple Hulls were raised on a working family farm in the deep piney woods of East Texas, but that didn’t stop the Texans from finding their way to the hills of Tennessee, specifically Music City, where they began touring with various country artists and writing songs for Nashville’s largest publishing company, Sony Tree.  The Purple Hulls are no stranger to road life and are now blazing the trail as a dynamic sister duo, showcasing their unique sibling harmonies while ripping the strings off any instrument they can get their hands on. If you’re looking for authentic acoustic driven music delivered at its best, your search is over.
https://thepurplehulls.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Dave Leatherman performing the traditional tune “Shoutin’ On the Hills,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins recounts the American geographer, geologist, and ethnologist Henry Schoolcraft’s harrowing experiences in the early Ozark regions of Arkansas & Missouri.

OHR Presents: The Hogslop String Band

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

High energy neo-traditional oldtime music phenomenon “The Hogslop String Band” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this rowdy group of pickers. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a very young Allison Krauss performing the Johnny Gimble tune “Gardenia Waltz.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates the history of black bears in the early Ozark region.

Hogslop_stringband_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, high energy neo-traditional oldtime music phenomenon “The Hogslop String Band” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this rowdy group of pickers.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a very young Allison Krauss performing the Johnny Gimble tune “Gardenia Waltz.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates the history of black bears in the early Ozark region.

The Hogslop String Band is a Nashville based old time string band comprised of four energetic young musicians hailing from Georgia & Tennessee.  Featuring Kevin Martin on the fiddle, Gabriel Kelley on guitar, Daniel Binkley on banjo and Casey "Pickle" McBride on the washtub bass, these boys surely raise a ruckus.

Upon forming as a pickup square dance band in the summer of 2009, The Hogslop String Band has since become one of the most sought after old time string bands. Known for their outrageous facial hair and a rollicking repertoire heavily based on Georgia and Middle Tennessee fiddle tunes, these boys have provided entertainment for fashion shows, political conventions and whiskey distilleries as well as countless weddings, festivals and soirees.

Following in the footsteps of such country music luminaries as Uncle Dave Macon and Gid Tanner, they put on a high energy show easily appreciated by both young and old alike.  Despite an unkempt appearance, their undeniable charm is as certain to steal your heart as it will your daughters!
http://www.hogslopstringband.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a very young Allison Krauss performing the Johnny Gimble tune “Gardenia Waltz,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates the history of black bears in the early Ozark regions of Arkansas & Missouri.

OHR096: OHR Presents: The Hogslop String Band, 12/3/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

High energy neo-traditional oldtime music phenomenon “The Hogslop String Band” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this rowdy group of pickers. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a very young Allison Krauss performing the traditional tune “Gardenia Waltz.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates the history of black bears in the early Ozark region.

Hogslop_stringband_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, high energy neo-traditional oldtime music phenomenon “The Hogslop String Band” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this rowdy group of pickers.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a very young Allison Krauss performing the traditional tune “Gardenia Waltz.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates the history of black bears in the early Ozark region.

The Hogslop String Band is a Nashville based old time string band comprised of four energetic young musicians hailing from Georgia & Tennessee.  Featuring Kevin Martin on the fiddle, Gabriel Kelley on guitar, Daniel Binkley on banjo and Casey "Pickle" McBride on the washtub bass, these boys surely raise a ruckus.

Upon forming as a pickup square dance band in the summer of 2009, The Hogslop String Band has since become one of the most sought after old time string bands. Known for their outrageous facial hair and a rollicking repertoire heavily based on Georgia and Middle Tennessee fiddle tunes, these boys have provided entertainment for fashion shows, political conventions and whiskey distilleries as well as countless weddings, festivals and soirees.

Following in the footsteps of such country music luminaries as Uncle Dave Macon and Gid Tanner, they put on a high energy show easily appreciated by both young and old alike.  Despite an unkempt appearance, their undeniable charm is as certain to steal your heart as it will your daughters!
http://www.hogslopstringband.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a very young Allison Krauss performing the traditional tune “Gardenia Waltz,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates the history of elk in the early Ozark regions of Arkansas & Missouri.

OHR Presents: The Dave Adkins Band

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Award winning contemporary bluegrass singer-songwriter Dave Adkins and his band, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Dave Adkins. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals the Trawick Family performing the traditional tune “Under the Double Eagle.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates a history of birds in the early Ozark region.

Dave_adkins_prx_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, award winning contemporary bluegrass singer-songwriter Dave Adkins and his band, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Dave Adkins.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals the Trawick Family performing the traditional tune “Under the Double Eagle.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates a history of birds in the early Ozark region.

There is no mistaking the raw and powerful vocals by singer, songwriter and guitarist Dave Adkins.  His significant chart success, coupled with his stellar live performances, have made him one of most talked about male vocalist in acoustic music.

Adkins was born in Pikeville, Kentucky and makes his home in Elkhorn City. He began playing and singing when he was just eight years old and joined a band with fellow classmates performing at schools and other venues. At 17, he began playing bluegrass music at Dollywood where he stayed two years. A year later, Adkins was named a Kentucky Colonel – the highest title of honor bestowed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Commissions for Kentucky colonels are given by the governor and the secretary of state to individuals in recognition of noteworthy accomplishments and outstanding service to a community, state or the nation.
- https://daveadkinsmusic.com/about/

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1979 archival recording of Ozark originals the Trawick Family performing the traditional tune “Under the Double Eagle,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates a history of birds in the early Ozark regions of Arkansas & Missouri.

OHR Presents: Musical Families

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Music by family, for family, and about family, performed by various artists recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Family life and ties are a big part of Ozark folk culture and music. Come on home with us to the Ozarks as we enjoy a little “family time,” celebrating the joy of familial bonding through song. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals, husband & wife team Jim & Denise Lansford performing the song “Are You From Dixie.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater explores the tradition of counting songs featuring the song “Bluebird,” written by folk music legend Jean Ritchie for her young sons.

Purple_hulls_prx_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, music by family, for family, and about family, performed by various artists recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Family life and ties are a big part of Ozark folk culture and music.  Come on home with us to the Ozarks as we enjoy a little “family time,” celebrating the joy of familial bonding through song.  Featured on this episode are a variety of artists including A.J. Croce, The Purple Hulls, Thom Bresh, Lukas & Eden Pool, The Gordons, The Honey Dewdrops, The Creek Rocks, The Lazy Goat String Band, The Weide Family, The Vogts Sisters, Love Hollar, and the Grandpa Jones Family Band.  We’ll hear songs by, for, and about family, many of them written by the artists themselves.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1981 archival recording of Ozark originals, husband & wife team Jim & Denise Lansford performing the song “Are You From Dixie” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater explores the strange tradition of “counting songs,” songs that feature counting numbers as part of their lyrics and meaning.  This episode includes, among other examples, the song “Bluebird,” written by folk music legend Jean Ritchie for her young sons.

OHR Presents: "Songs out of Style"

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Songs out of style, performed by various artists recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Songs can transcend musical styles and those styles can also transcend their traditional songs. “Songs out of Style” explores the movement of great songs, both old and modern, across musical genres. We’ll hear traditional songs made new again and modern songs remade in the old ways. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a very young Ozark original, Dwight Moody, performing the song “In the Pines.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater presents the peregrination of a song, following the journey of traditional song “Loving Hannah” from Ireland to America and back again.

Barefoot_movement_prx_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, songs out of style performed by various artists recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Songs can transcend musical styles and those styles can also transcend their traditional songs. 

“Songs out of Style” explores the movement of great songs, both old and modern, across musical genres.  We’ll hear traditional songs made new again, and modern songs remade in the old ways.

Artists featured on “Songs out of Style” include bluegrass sensation The Barefoot Movement, experimental acoustic ensemble Jayme Stone & The Lomax Project - featuring Moira Smiley, amazing sibling duo The Vogts Sisters, renowned traditional music explorers Anna & Elizabeth, internet star & hammered dulcimer Jedi Ted Yoder, mountain dulcimer world champion Jeff Hames, mountain dulcimer guru & musical mad scientist Bing Futch & Co, Red Wing Roots Music Festival founders & oldtime supergroup The Steel Wheels, as well as old-time music masters, comedians, and all-around hooligans The Hogslop String Band.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a very young Ozark original, Dwight Moody, performing the song “In the Pines,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.  “In the Pines” is a traditional American song that was remade into a modern hit in 1993 by the grunge rock band Nirvana as “Where Did You Sleep Last Night.”

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater explores the peregrination of a song, following the journey of traditional song “Loving Hannah” from Ireland to America and back again.  Aubrey presents various artists’ versions of the song including herself, Mary Black, Carrie Norris, and Jean Ritchie with her son Jon Pickow.

OHR Presents: Christmas!

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Christmas songs both traditional & rare, performed by an interesting array of folk musicians, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Hosts Dave Smith & Mark Jones present these festive archival holiday recordings. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of his father, country music legend Grandpa Jones reciting a poem called “The Christmas Guest.” Aubry Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile the story of folk music royalty Jean Ritchie’s first family Christmas tree.

Joni_bishop_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Christmas songs both traditional & rare, performed by an interesting array of folk musicians, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Hosts Dave Smith & Mark Jones present these festive archival holiday recordings.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of his father, country music legend Grandpa Jones reciting a poem called “The Christmas Guest.”  Aubry Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile the story of folk music royalty Jean Ritchie’s first family Christmas tree.

Musicians at the Ozark Folk Center State Park have been putting on Christmas music shows for over four decades.  As with most music performed at the park, the Christmas music represented here is not your normal collection of holiday standards.  You’ll hear a few songs that you know and love, as well as many others that you’ve likely never encountered before.  The eclectic range of musicians performing on this edition of Ozark Highlands Radio include Grandpa Jones, Randall Hylton, The Dowden Sisters, The Lonesome Cowboys, Joni Bishop, Bob Olivera, The Heritage Quartet, and more.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of his father, country music legend Grandpa Jones, reciting a poem called “The Christmas Guest,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Renowned folk musicians Aubrey Atwater & Elwood Donnelly profile influential folk music icons Jean Ritchie and the Ritchie Family, as well as explore the traditional Appalachian music and dance that the Ritchie Family helped to perpetuate into the modern American folk lexicon.  This episode relates Jean Ritchie’s own childhood memories of an early Ritchie Family Christmas.

OHR098: OHR Presents: The Dave Adkins Band, 12/10/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Award winning contemporary bluegrass singer-songwriter Dave Adkins and his band, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Dave Adkins. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals the Trawick Family performing the traditional tune “Under the Double Eagle.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates a history of birds in the early Ozark region.

Dave_adkins_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, award winning contemporary bluegrass singer-songwriter Dave Adkins and his band, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Dave Adkins.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals the Trawick Family performing the traditional tune “Under the Double Eagle.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates a history of birds in the early Ozark region.

There is no mistaking the raw and powerful vocals by singer, songwriter and guitarist Dave Adkins.  His significant chart success, coupled with his stellar live performances, have made him one of most talked about male vocalist in acoustic music.

Adkins was born in Pikeville, Kentucky and makes his home in Elkhorn City. He began playing and singing when he was just eight years old and joined a band with fellow classmates performing at schools and other venues. At 17, he began playing bluegrass music at Dollywood where he stayed two years. A year later, Adkins was named a Kentucky Colonel – the highest title of honor bestowed by the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Commissions for Kentucky colonels are given by the governor and the secretary of state to individuals in recognition of noteworthy accomplishments and outstanding service to a community, state or the nation.
https://daveadkinsmusic.com/about/

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1979 archival recording of Ozark originals the Trawick Family performing the traditional tune “Under the Double Eagle,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates a history of birds in the early Ozark regions of Arkansas & Missouri.

OHR097: OHR Presents: Meredith Axelrod, 12/24/2018

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Mysterious time traveling minstrel Meredith Axelrod recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this amazing musical apparition. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of David Prine, brother of famed singer-songwriter John Prine, performing the tune “Southern Railroad Blues.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates the history of panthers & wolves in the early Ozark region.

Meredith_axelrod_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, mysterious time traveling minstrel Meredith Axelrod recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this amazing musical apparition.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of David Prine, brother of famed singer-songwriter John Prine, performing the tune “Southern Railroad Blues.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates the history of panthers & wolves in the early Ozark region.

Delightfully engaging and unassumingly comic, Meredith Axelrod envisions the limitless potential of early twentieth century music, whether it be Ragtime, Music Hall, Pop Standard, Boogie Woogie, Tin Pan Alley, String band, Jazz, Country, Blues or even Jug Band music, and embodies the spirit that brought the music into existence in the first place.  Her vocal style is unusual, probably because she learned to sing by listening to how folks did it a century ago – through the medium of cylinders and 78-rpm records.

The dominant theme throughout her expansive repertoire, is that, whatever the genre, these are songs she learns from the original sources (records and / or sheet music) which were released  between the 1890s and the 1930s. Part of the allure of old time music, indeed any music throughout the history of recorded music, is hearing the original recordings as played and sung by the original performers in their heyday, loving what they’re doing and doing it because it means something to them in that moment, never because of nostalgia, and Meredith brings the same unbridled passion, earnest devotion and candid vitality to all of her music; she has found possibility and joy in the treasures of cultural folklore.
https://meredithaxelrod.com/about/

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1979 archival recording of David Prine, brother of famed singer-songwriter John Prine, performing the tune “Southern Railroad Blues,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins relates the history of panthers & wolves in the early Ozark regions of Arkansas & Missouri.

OHR109: OHR Presents: Bonnie Montgomery, 1/21/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

ACMA female vocalist of the year, songwriter and up and coming Outlaw Country star, Arkansas’ own Bonnie Montgomery recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this uniquely talented Arkansas singer-songwriter. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of legendary fiddler Billy Matthews performing the traditional tune “Arkansas Traveller.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage asks the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

Bonnie_montgomery_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, 2018 ACMA Female Vocalist of the Year, Ameripolitan Outlaw Female of the Year, songwriter and up and coming Outlaw Country star, Arkansas’ own Bonnie Montgomery recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this uniquely talented Arkansas singer-songwriter.

“Upon first listening to Bonnie Montgomery, it’s easy to mistakenly assume that you’ve stumbled upon a long-buried track by a legend from the golden era of country/western music.  Such is the artistry of this Arkansas native and silver-voiced songstress.  Her story is of her journey but she presents it through a folk/bluegrass/country perspective that’s traditional and timeless.

Montgomery’s stunning vocal chops and ability to draw listeners in with her natural songwriting talent should come as no surprise.  Her musical roots run deep.  Brought up among the never-ending sound of music that flowed through her family’s Arkansas music store, her childhood was heavily steeped in Ozark bluegrass, Texas swing, Delta blues, as well as gospel and rock and roll. Surrounded by talented musicians that ran the gamut from performers on the original Sun Records to bluegrass greats and opera singers, Montgomery expanded her musical horizons and began performing.”
- https://www.bonniemontgomerymusic.com/about 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1983 archival recording of legendary fiddler Billy Matthews performing the traditional tune “Arkansas Traveller.” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  In this episode, Charley discusses with Jeanette Larson, Craft Director at the Ozark Folk Center State Park the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

OHR Presents: The Secret Sisters

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Grammy nominated Muscle Shoals Americana & contemporary bluegrass singer-songwriter mega-duo The Secret Sisters, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these superlative siblings. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of autoharp master Ron Wall performing the traditional tune “Home Sweet Home.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater presents “Devil Songs,” illuminating the dark angel’s appearance in generations of traditional folk songs.

Secret_sisters_abraham_rowe_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Grammy nominated Muscle Shoals Americana & contemporary bluegrass singer-songwriter mega-duo The Secret Sisters, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these superlative siblings.

The Secret Sisters are an Americana singing and songwriting duo consisting of vocalists Laura Rogers and Lydia Slagle.  The sisters’ music has been compared to artists like The Everly Brothers.  Laura and Lydia are from Muscle Shoals, Alabama.  With a love for music coming from both sides of their family (their grandfather and his brothers forged a group called The Happy Valley Boys,) they grew up with a zeal for country music and sang songs with their family by country music artists such as Don Williams. The girls first learned to harmonize through singing a cappella at their hometown church.

The sisters have produced three albums.  Their third album, “You Don’t Own Me Anymore” produced by Brandi Carlile, received the duo’s first Grammy nomination.  Aside from touring the world with their unique brand of Southern story telling and impeccable harmonies, the Secret Sisters have appeared on The Late Show with David Letterman, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, and have a song featured on the movie soundtrack for “The Hunger Games.”

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1983 archival recording of autoharp master Ron Wall performing the traditional tune “Home Sweet Home,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater presents “Devil Songs.”  Aubrey will guide us through the dark angel’s appearance in generations of traditional folk songs with musical examples and her own cultivated insight.

OHR Presents: The Seldom Scene

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Legendary Grammy nominated Bethesda, Maryland progressive bluegrass super-group The Seldom Scene recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this enduring and enigmatic group of bluegrass pioneers. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Bob Atchison performing the traditional tune “Bull at the Wagon.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater presents “Ballads That End Well,” proving that folk ballads don’t always end with a grizzly horrifying death.

Seldom_scene_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, legendary Grammy nominated Bethesda, Maryland progressive bluegrass super-group The Seldom Scene recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with this enduring and enigmatic group of bluegrass pioneers.

“The Seldom Scene is an American bluegrass band formed in 1971 in Bethesda, Maryland. The Scene has been instrumental in starting the progressive bluegrass movement as their shows include bluegrass versions of country music, rock, and even pop. What does it take for a bluegrass band to remain popular for more than four decades? For The Seldom Scene, it's taken not only talented musicians, a signature sound, and a solid repertoire, but also a sheer sense of fun.”
- https://www.seldomscene.com/band/

For almost fifty years, The Seldom Scene has been a staple of the American bluegrass landscape.  Their innovative approach to this traditional genre has brought bluegrass music to an ever widening audience.  While paying homage to the genre with traditional instrumentation & harmony singing, The Seldom Scene cleverly apply a fresh coat of bluegrass bent to seemingly any kind of song they choose.  Along with traditional bluegrass songs, rock, country, pop, and even classical music are reimagined into fresh masterpieces.

Although the lineup of The Seldom Scene has changed slightly over the decades, the sound and spirit of the group has endured.  Today, they are Dudley Connell on guitar, Lou Reid manning mandolin & guitar, Ron Stewart taking on banjo & fiddle, Fred Travers on dobro, and Ronnie Simpkins holding up the bottom end on bass.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1983 archival recording of Ozark original Bob Atchison performing the traditional fiddle tune “Bull at the Wagon,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater presents “Ballads That End Well,” proving that folk ballads don’t always end with a grizzly horrifying death.

OHR Presents: John McEuen & The String Wizards

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

World renowned Grammy award winning musician, producer, writer, filmmaker, and founding member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, John McEuen with his String Wizards recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this prolific creator and performer. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of his father, country music icon Grandpa Jones performing the classic song “Mountain Dew.”

John_mceuen_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, world renowned Grammy award winning musician, producer, writer, filmmaker, and founding member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, John McEuen with his String Wizards recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this prolific creator and performer.

“John McEuen has been a ‘professional performer’ since 1962, working as a magician in Disneyland’s Magic Shop as a teenager.  Music soon came along, which led to his long and varied career first solo, then as a founding member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in 1966.  Over 10,000 concerts and 300 television shows throughout more than 3 million miles - with the band and as a solo performer - John has pursued his passion for performing and recording.  John left NGDB at the end of their 50th year touring to focus on the demand for his solo performing and projects.  Beyond performing, he concurrenty has a rich history of creating, producing and preserving original and traditional folk and acoustic music, and taking it to new audiences.

“He brings his guitar, banjo, fiddle, and mandolin along with favorite NGDB songs and the stories behind them to the stage in a manner that earned the honored Best in the West Award from the Folk Alliance Organization.

“McEuen has made over 40 albums (7 solo) that have earned four platinum and five gold recognition awards, Grammy nominations, CMA and ACM awards, an Emmy nomination, IBMA record of the year award, and performed on another 25 albums as guest artist. He's also produced another 7 albums, and 14 film scores (two Emmy nominated shows) and more than 300 concerts throughout his career - the first in 1965 in Long Beach Calif., with Bob Dylan.

“His production of Steve Martin - The Crow won the 2010 Best Bluegrass Album Grammy.  Prior to that, The Music of the Wild West CD- produced by McEuen, was honored with the Western Heritage Award. A Grammy nomination for String Wizards II preceded the1994 Uncle Dave Macon Award for his excellence in preservation and performance of historic music.  On Sirius/XM's The Bridge, John's popular Acoustic Traveller show is now in its 9th year.  McEuen produced and directed the 2006 documentary film The Dillards - A Night In the Ozarks, which captures his early mentors at their best.

“In April of 2018 John officially became an author, with his first book The Life I’ve Picked being published (On Chicago Review Press).  A memoire, a telling of incredible stories from raising 6 kids in the music business and the ins and outs of being an iconic band member to being a single father to his current full and varied career, his book takes the reader on his unusual journey.

“In September of 2017 John was inducted in to the American Banjo Museum Hall of Fame.
McEuen's countless jams include street performers to Phish, Earl Scruggs, Levon Helm… and even on Sesame Street with a herd of goats and a cow!  Arguably, McEuen's most important legacy may be his initiating what Rolling Stone called ‘The most important record to come out of Nashville’ and what the 2004 ZAGAT survey called ‘the most important record in country music’ - Will the Circle Be Unbroken.”
http://www.johnmceuen.com/biography.html

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1973 archival recording of his father, country music icon Grandpa Jones performing the classic song “Mountain Dew,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR Presents: Lula Wiles

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Smithsonian Folkways recording artists and award winning Boston, Massachusetts progressive folk trio “Lula Wiles” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these bright Boston bards. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original fiddler, Roger Fountain, performing the traditional tune “Saint Anne’s Reel.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage asks the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

Lula_wiles_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s historic 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Smithsonian Folkways artists and award winning Boston, Massachusetts progressive folk trio “Lula Wiles” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these bright Boston bards.

Lula Wiles is a Boston based progressive folk trio consisting of Isa Burke, Eleanor Buckland, and Mali Obomsawin.  Their blending of instrumental virtuosity, intricate three part harmony singing, and visionary songwriting has quickly ushered them to the forefront of modern American contemporary folk music.  With the recent release of their Smithsonian Folkways album “What Will We Do,” the trio now joins the ranks of America’s most important folk artists. 

“Long before they were in a band together, the members of Lula Wiles were singing folk songs and trading fiddle tunes at camp in Maine.  ‘All of us were lucky to have access to the folk music community at a young age,’ Burke says. “The music traditions that we’re drawing on are social, community-building traditions.” On those warm summer nights, playing music was just plain fun. But the members of Lula Wiles carry those early lessons of community and the meaning of shared art with them to this day, as they seek to create music that questions cultural virtues, soothes aching wounds, and envisions a better world.

“Lula Wiles came of age in Boston, in the practice rooms of Berklee College of Music and the city’s lively roots scene. In 2016, the band self-released Lula Wiles, a sensitive, twang-tinged collection of originals. Since then, they have toured internationally, winning fans at the Newport Folk Festival and the Philadelphia Folk Festival, and sharing stages with the likes of Aoife O’Donovan, the Wood Brothers, and Tim O’Brien.

“Now, the release of What Will We Do on Smithsonian Folkways Recordings places the group squarely in line with some of its deepest influences, from the protest anthems of Woody Guthrie to the trailblazing songs of Elizabeth Cotten and Hazel Dickens. (Even the band’s name is a twist on an old Carter Family song.)” - http://www.lulawiles.com/bio/ 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1983 archival recording of Ozark original fiddler, Roger Fountain, performing the traditional tune “Saint Anne’s Reel,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  In this episode, Charley speaks with environmentalist and author Richard Mason on the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

OHR Presents: Mandolin Orange

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

In this special episode, Ozark Highlands Radio partners with Oxford American Magazine to bring Chapel Hill, North Carolina based rising contemporary folk and Americana superstars “Mandolin Orange,” recorded live at South on Main in downtown Little Rock, Arkansas. Also, an interview with Oxford American Literary Project executive director Ryan Harris. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Pat & Bob Momich performing the traditional tune “Soldier’s Joy.”

Mandolin_orange_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s historic 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, a very special episode.  Ozark Highlands Radio partners with Oxford American Magazine to bring Chapel Hill, North Carolina based rising contemporary folk and Americana superstars “Mandolin Orange,” recorded live at South on Main in downtown Little Rock, Arkansas.  Also, an interview with Oxford American Literary Project executive director Ryan Harris.  Mandolin Orange are joined in this performance by Eli West on guitar & banjo, Josh Oliver on electric guitar, Clint Mulligan on Bass, and Joe Westerlund on drums.

“The Oxford American is a nonprofit organization with a mission to explore the complexity and vitality of the American South through excellent writing, visual art, and events programming. Our quarterly print magazine was founded in 1992, and, in addition to winning four National Magazine Awards, has helped launch the writing careers of such noted authors as Jesmyn Ward and John Jeremiah Sullivan, while publishing beloved writers like Charles Portis, Nikky Finney, Peter Guralnick, and many others.

“Our concert series at South on Main in Little Rock is an extension of the magazine, creating meaningful opportunities for the community to experience the most culturally significant artists in our region.

“The OA has a longstanding history of curating great music. Our Winter 2018 issue is dedicated to the music of North Carolina. It is our twentieth installment of the series, which the Houston Chronicle calls "the single best music-related magazine of any given year." Each music issue comes with a sought-after CD, curated by the editors to showcase the region's hugely
varied musical legacy.”

More information about Oxford American programming, the magazine, and their mission can be found at
https://www.oxfordamerican.org 

“Mandolin Orange is an Americana/folk duo based out of Chapel Hill, North Carolina.The group was formed in 2009 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and consists of the group's songwriter Andrew Marlin (vocals, mandolin, guitar, banjo) and Emily Frantz (vocals, violin, guitar). Mandolin Orange has produced five albums of Marlin's original works of American roots music. In the last three years, the group has toured throughout the U.S and Europe, including appearances at Austin City Limits, South-by-Southwest, Telluride Bluegrass Festival, Newport Folk Festival, Pickathon, and Merlefest. They signed to Yep Roc Records in 2013 and have produced four albums under their umbrella, This Side of Jordan, Such Jubilee, Blindfaller and Tides of a Teardrop.”

Learn more about Mandolin Orange at
-  http://www.mandolinorange.com/#home-section 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1981 archival recording of Ozark originals Pat & Bob Momich performing the traditional tune “Soldier’s Joy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR116: OHR Presents: Dane Joneshill, 3/11/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Arkansas Ozark singer-songwriter Dane Joneshill recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this talented Ozark original. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of another Ozark original, Stephanie Isaacs, performing the traditional ballad “Lady Mary.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage asks the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

Dane_joneshill_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s historic 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Arkansas Ozark singer-songwriter Dane Joneshill recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with this talented Ozark original.

Dane Joneshill is a quiet man.  A man accustomed to silence and the watching, listening and waiting that generally accompany it.  He grew up in the coastal loneliness of rural Alaska in a home tucked against the base of a mountain, a stone’s throw from the cold Pacific.  Educated in a bush school by his own father, he remembers the focus of much of that class time.  “We read books constantly.  Wrote poems and short stories when we weren’t reading, and played in the woods for hours.  I have no memories of math or science, whatsoever.”  Probably not a well-rounded education, but it forced words and language deep into his soul and forged a weld with the emotional power of story.  With a lyricism more akin to a novelist than a songwriter, his songs are at once wry, charming, and bittersweet.  Like a Steinbeck novel, they walk the tension of darkness and loss in order to find the lights of hope.  -  https://danejoneshillmusic.com 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1975 archival recording of Ozark original Stephanie Isaacs, performing the traditional ballad “Lady Mary,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  In this episode, Charley speaks with author and herbalist Tina Marie Wilcox on the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

OHR058: OHR Presents: "The Honey Dewdrops", 3/25/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Neo-folk family troubadours “The Honey Dewdrops” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this talented husband & wife duo. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Bobby Hayes performing the traditional song “Pretty Polly.” Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Max Collins.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, neo-folk family troubadours “The Honey Dewdrops” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with this talented husband & wife duo.

Based out of Baltimore, MD, the Honey Dewdrops continue a long line of husband and wife duos making beautiful music together.  Laura Wortman and Kagey Parrish now reside in Baltimore, but have strong connecting roots to the music in their home state of Virginia.  Their popularity continues to grow, as they have performed at MerleFest and the Redwing Roots Music Festival.  Instrumentation is classic Americana and includes guitar, banjo, and harmonica. Coupled with spectacular vocal harmonies, their original material remains true to both traditional and contemporary forms of American roots music.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Bobby Hayes performing the traditional classic “Pretty Polly,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Fine Fiddlers of the Ozarks,” old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles the legendary Ozark fiddler Max Collins.  This installment features archival recordings of the classic fiddle tunes ”Railroad Runs Through Georgia, Old Number 9, Whistling Rufus, and Lonesome Hill.”

OHR075: OHR Presents: Jayme Stone & The Lomax Project, 4/1/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Neo-folk & progressive bluegrass sensation Jayme Stone & The Lomax Project recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Jayme about his music and the ambitious Lomax Project. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Mona Fay Moody performing the traditional song “I Will Never Marry.”

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, neo-folk, Americana, and progressive bluegrass sensation Jayme Stone & The Lomax Project recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Jayme about his music and the ambitious Lomax Project.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Mona Fay Moody performing the traditional song “I Will Never Marry.”

Two-time Juno-winning banjoist, composer and instigator Jayme Stone makes music inspired by sounds from around the world—bridging folk, jazz, and chamber music.  His award-winning albums both defy and honor the banjo’s long role in the world’s music, turning historical connections into compelling sounds.  Stone is the consummate collaborator, unearthing musical artifacts and magnetizing extraordinary artists to help rekindle these understudied sounds. He is a passionate educator, producer, and instigator.

Jayme Stone’s Lomax Project focuses on songs collected by folklorist and field recording pioneer Alan Lomax.  This collaboration brings together distinctive and creative roots musicians to revive, recycle and reimagine traditional music.  The repertoire includes Bahamian sea shanties, Sea Island spirituals, Appalachian ballads, fiddle tunes and work songs collected from both well-known musicians and everyday folk:  sea captains, cowhands, fishermen, prisoners and homemakers.  Collaborators on this particular live show include Moira Smiley and Tristan Clarridge.

Moira Smiley is a singer & composer who creates and performs new work for voices.  A musical polyglot, and vocal shape-shifter, her voice – and composing – are heard on feature films, BBC & PBS television programs, NPR, and on more than 60 albums.  When she’s not leading her own group, Moira Smiley & VOCO, Moira tours with Indie artist tUnE-yArDs, Irish music powerhouse, Solas, The Lomax Project and Billy Child’s “Laura Nyro Re-Imagined.”  Recent solo performances include TED, Stravinsky’s ‘Les Noces,’ the London Proms Festival, features on BBC3’s The Choir, and ABC Australia’s Books & Arts programs. Moira’s recordings feature spare, vocally driven collections of warped traditional songs, original polyphony and body percussion.  In addition to her performing work, she is in high demand as a choral clinician, composer and arranger.

Multi-instrumentalist Tristan Clarridge is a 5-time Grand National Fiddle Champion and a pioneering cellist, synthesizing traditional folk influences with rhythmic vocabulary from jazz, rock and pop music, and leading a revolution among adventurous young cellists throughout the country.  He has toured the world with bluegrass/nu-folk sensation Crooked Still and Darol Anger’s Republic of Strings, as well as Mike Marshall, Bruce Molsky and Cape Breton fiddle phenomenon Natalie MacMaster.  Tristan’s latest collaboration, “The Bee Eaters,” features his talented sister Tashina Clarridge as well as hammered dulcimer wizard Simon Chrisman.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Mona Fay Moody performing the traditional song “I Will Never Marry,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR120: OHR Presents: The Whispering Willows, 4/29/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Award winning Ozark singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist duo The Whispering Willows recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this progressive husband and wife folk duo. Also, a performance by singer and multi-instrumentalist Keith Symanowitz, backed by Lukas Pool, Sam Cobb, Danny Dozier, Gresham McMillon, and John Severs. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Cathy Barton performing the traditional tune “Hecksham Races.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the mysterious Prince Daruki, an enigmatic music teacher of questionable aristocratic origin who lived in the early Ozarks.

Whispering_willows_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, award winning Ozark singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist duo The Whispering Willows recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this progressive husband and wife folk duo.  Also, a performance by singer and multi-instrumentalist Keith Symanowitz, backed by Ozark originals Lukas Pool, Sam Cobb, Danny Dozier, Gresham McMillon, and John Severs.

The Whispering Willows is an Americana duo featuring warm and rich vocals, masterful songwriting, and the finely crafted fiddle work of Alaina Blake & Dylan Hawf.  Alaina, originally from Lawrence, Kansas, has made her home with husband Dylan at Eureka Springs, Arkansas in the heart of the Ozarks.  From a diverse musical background including old-time, Americana, classic country, bluegrass, Irish music, and rock, Alaina’s vocal style is at once unique and sincere with a subtlety that belies the emotional and powerful nature of her songwriting.  One of her performances is featured in the Netflix original series “Ozark.”  Dylan Hawf, originally from Illinois, comes from a musical family.  His father, guitarist Doug Hawf encouraged Dylan’s fiddle playing from an early age, sending him to bluegrass camps where he was able to study with some of the greatest players around.  Alaina & Dylan’s collaboration began at the famed annual music festival in Winfield, Kansas and has blossomed into not only a powerful musical force but also romance and marriage.

Keith Symanowitz is not only the marketing specialist at the Ozark Folk Center State Park, he’s also a talented singer, traditional dancer, and multi-instrumentalist.  Keith’s modern and soulful vocal style breathes new life into well known traditional folk songs.  In this performance, Keith is joined by some of the Ozarks’ most talented musicians including Lukas Pool on clawhammer banjo, Sam Cobb on mandolin, Danny Dozier on finger style guitar, Gresham McMillon on bass, and thumb picking guitarist John Severs.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Cathy Barton performing the traditional tune “Hecksham Races,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the mysterious Prince Daruki, an enigmatic music teacher of questionable aristocratic origin who lived in the early Ozarks.

OHR049: OHR Presents: Don Edwards, 5/20/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Consummate cowboy balladeer and Grammy nominated performer Don Edwards performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Don. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Jesse Wright, singing the classic Jimmy Rodgers song “The Orphan Child.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the second in a series of three Ozark regional ballads, “Lee Mills.”

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, consummate cowboy balladeer and Grammy nominated performer Don Edwards performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Don.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Jesse Wright, singing the classic Jimmy Rodgers song “The Orphan Child.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the second in a series of three Ozark regional ballads, “Lee Mills.”

One of America’s best loved and most enduring cowboy singers, Don Edwards is indeed an American treasure.  His love and passion for traditional cowboy songs is second to none and has earned him a fan base worldwide.  He knows the songs, the stories, and even some of the old trails that made the old West famous.  Accompanied by his trusty guitar, Don takes us on a trip back in time when cowboy singers and songs echoed through the trails, taverns, and cattle drive camps of yesterday.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of the mysterious Jesse Wright, singing the classic Jimmy Rodgers song “The Orphan Child,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins presents the second of three episodes on Ozark regional ballads.  This episode features a recording of the traditional Ozark ballad “Lee Mills,” sung by husband and wife Berry and Clementine Sutterfield of Marshall, Arkansas on August 1, 1963. The recording was made by folklorist John Quincy Wolf, and is preserved in Lyon College’s “John Quincy Wolf Collection.”

OHR049: OHR Presents: Don Edwards, 5/20/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Consummate cowboy balladeer and Grammy nominated performer Don Edwards performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Don. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Jesse Wright, singing the classic Jimmy Rodgers song “The Orphan Child.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the second in a series of three Ozark regional ballads, “Lee Mills.”

Don_edwards_prx_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, consummate cowboy balladeer and Grammy nominated performer Don Edwards performs live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Don.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Jesse Wright, singing the classic Jimmy Rodgers song “The Orphan Child.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the second in a series of three Ozark regional ballads, “Lee Mills.”

One of America’s best loved and most enduring cowboy singers, Don Edwards is indeed an American treasure.  His love and passion for traditional cowboy songs is second to none and has earned him a fan base worldwide.  He knows the songs, the stories, and even some of the old trails that made the old West famous.  Accompanied by his trusty guitar, Don takes us on a trip back in time when cowboy singers and songs echoed through the trails, taverns, and cattle drive camps of yesterday.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of the mysterious Jesse Wright, singing the classic Jimmy Rodgers song “The Orphan Child,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins presents the second of three episodes on Ozark regional ballads.  This episode features a recording of the traditional Ozark ballad “Lee Mills,” sung by husband and wife Berry and Clementine Sutterfield of Marshall, Arkansas on August 1, 1963. The recording was made by folklorist John Quincy Wolf, and is preserved in Lyon College’s “John Quincy Wolf Collection.”

OHR124: OHR Presents: Newberry & Verch , 6/3/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

International Oldtime string band and Ottawa Valley step dance duo Newberry & Verch recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this dynamic musical duo. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of his famous father, Grandpa Jones, telling the classic joke “Surprise Aunt Marthy.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles prolific Ozark musician Slim Wilson of the Ozark Jubilee, one of America’s first nationally-broadcast old time barn dance country music television shows based in Springfield, Missouri.

Newberry___verch_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, international Oldtime string band and Ottawa Valley step dance duo Newberry & Verch recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with this dynamic musical duo.

“Joe Newberry grew up in a family full of singers and dancers.  He took up the guitar and banjo as a  teenager and learned fiddle tunes from great Missouri fiddlers.  April Verch grew up listening to her Dad’s country band play for dances in the Ottawa Valley.  She started step dancing at age three and fiddling at age six. 

Both Newberry & Verch became masters of their traditions and tour the world with their respective bands and projects.  Yet they never forget the roots of their music, that connection to the people in the audience, on the dance floor, to the community sparked by a good song.  For these veteran performers who come from distinct traditions and parts of the world, their collaboration is fueled by their kindred passion for bringing people together to celebrate traditional music. 

Blues and ballads stem into Canadian regional styles and originals.  Their voices blend in harmony, their tasteful instrumentals prove that these masters have nothing left to prove, and then their feet kick up the dust in perfect rhythm…and together, they make you remember why this music existed in the first place.”
http://aprilverch.com/about/newberry-verch/

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1976 archival recording of his famous father, Grandpa Jones, telling the classic joke “Surprise Aunt Marthy.” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles prolific Ozark musician Slim Wilson of the Ozark Jubilee, one of America’s first nationally-broadcast Old Time barn dance country music television shows, based in Springfield, Missouri.

OHR030: OHR Presents: "Riders in the Sky", 6/24/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Grammy Award winning cowboy quartet “Riders in the Sky” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bud & Karen Bell.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Grammy Award winning cowboy quartet “Riders in the Sky” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bud & Karen Bell.

For over 30 years, “Riders in the Sky” have kept the “cowboy way” of music alive, performing traditional songs from Roy Rogers, Gene Autry, and other classic Western music artists.  They are two-time Grammy Award winners, boasting exceptional musicianship across the board.  For this program, the band was performing show number 6,235.  There are a lot of ways to crunch those numbers, but that would essentially amount to over 17 years of successive shows.  That is some real staying power. 

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bud & Karen Bell performing the song “Cannonball Blues,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR104: OHR Presents: Musical Families, 7/1/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Music by family, for family, and about family, performed by various artists recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Family life and ties are a big part of Ozark folk culture and music. Come on home with us to the Ozarks as we enjoy a little “family time,” celebrating the joy of familial bonding through song. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals, husband & wife team Jim & Denise Lansford performing the song “Are You From Dixie.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater explores the tradition of counting songs featuring the song “Bluebird,” written by folk music legend Jean Ritchie for her young sons.

Purple_hulls_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, music by family, for family, and about family, performed by various artists recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Family life and ties are a big part of Ozark folk culture and music.  Come on home with us to the Ozarks as we enjoy a little “family time,” celebrating the joy of familial bonding through song.  Featured on this episode are a variety of artists including A.J. Croce, The Purple Hulls, Thom Bresh, Lukas & Eden Pool, The Gordons, The Honey Dewdrops, The Creek Rocks, The Lazy Goat String Band, The Weide Family, The Vogts Sisters, Love Hollar, and the Grandpa Jones Family Band.  We’ll hear songs by, for, and about family, many of them written by the artists themselves.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1981 archival recording of Ozark originals, husband & wife team Jim & Denise Lansford performing the song “Are You From Dixie” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater explores the strange tradition of “counting songs,” songs that feature counting numbers as part of their lyrics and meaning.  This episode includes, among other examples, the song “Bluebird,” written by folk music legend Jean Ritchie for her young sons.

OHR032: OHR Presents: The Steel Wheels, 7/8/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Shenandoah Valley Virginia Progressive Folk Roots Band “The Steel Wheels” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with the band, and Mark Jones “From the Vault” segment features an archival recording of Ozark original Doug Ward, performing the traditional song “The Fox.”

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Shenandoah Valley, Virginia progressive folk roots Band “The Steel Wheels” perform live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with the band, and Mark Jones “From the Vault” segment.

The Steel Wheels are a four piece acoustic band that combines the instrumentation and song structure of traditional Old Time music with a modern sensibility and drive.  Performing together since 2010, The Steel Wheels hail from the rich musical grounds of the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia.  The band sponsors and organizes an annual music festival, held in the lush Shenandoah Valley, called the “Red Wing Roots Music Festival.”

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment offers an archival recording of Ozark original Doug Ward performing the traditional song “The Fox,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR015: OHR Presents: Bing Futch, 7/22/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

International Blues Challenge award winning Dulcimer maven Bing Futch recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Bing, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of authentic Ozark fiddler Sam Younger.

Bing_futch_prx_small

Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, International Blues Challenge award winning Dulcimer maven Bing Futch recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Bing, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of authentic Ozark fiddler Sam Younger.

Bing Futch is a new breed of talent in the world of the mountain dulcimer.  While he performs traditional dulcimer tunes, his influences from all areas of music have been adapted to his dulcimer playing, including the use of effects pedals and other whiz-bang electronic stuff.  He is a regular contributor and instructor at the Annual Dulcimer Jamboree at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Bing was recently won best guitarist at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis, Tennessee and yes, he was playing his dulcimer.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and an enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on the roots music aspect of the Ozark Folk Center State Park, and it’s mission to preserve the old Ozark ways.

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of authentic Ozark fiddler Sam Younger,  performing the traditional song “Turkey in the Straw,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR069: OHR Presents: Bill and the Belles, 7/29/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Old time early radio days throwback quartet Bill and the Belles recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these novel retro performers. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Aubrey Richardson performing the traditional Ozark song “Dry & Dusty.”

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, old time early radio days throwback quartet Bill and the Belles recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these novel retro performers.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Aubrey Richardson performing the traditional song “Bunker Hill.”

What began as a project to explore the space created between hillbilly and urban, between vaudeville and down home, has arrived somewhere entirely new.  Bill and the Belles offers a contemporary reimagining of a bygone era, a vocal-centric performance that breathes new life into the sounds of early country music.  At the foothills of the Blue Ridge and the forefront of old-time music, Bill and the Belles continue to further the music traditions of their region.  From sentimental Southern ballads to the popular songs of Tin Pan Alley to regional fiddle breakdowns, a Bill and the Belles show is a celebration of the diversity country music once represented.

Bill and the Belles play alongside America’s top country and roots music artists as the house band for the historic radio program Farm and Fun Time presented by Radio Bristol and the Birthplace of Country Music. Lifelong musicians Kris Truelsen, Grace Van’t Hof, Kalia Yeagle, and Karl Zerfas bring to the stage an uplifting show unlike any other, full of humor, high spirits, and all-around revelry. It’s clear this group shares a rare musical connection and deep love for the music, and their excitement is contagious.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Aubrey Richardson performing the traditional song “Bunker Hill,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR018: OHR Presents: Dennis Stroughmatt, 8/5/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Bona fide Illinois French trouveur & fiddler Dennis Stroughmatt recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Dennis, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical sojourn into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of a trio of Ozark originals, Walter Gosser, Mike Hill, and Dean Hinesley.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, bona fide Illinois French trouveur & fiddler Dennis Stroughmatt recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Dennis, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical sojourn into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of a trio of Ozark originals, Walter Gosser, Mike Hill, and Dean Hinesley.

Dennis Stroughmatt is a renaissance man.  His passion for the Creole fiddle and French music of the Southern Illinois/Missouri region has lead him on a journey to the backwoods of Louisiana and the University of Quebec.  He has nearly single handedly revitalized the original Creole music and French culture of the Illinois-Missouri region by rekindling a love and passion for the culture and song.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and an enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on traditional dance styles of the Ozark region.

Mark Jones ' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of a trio of Ozark originals, Walter Gosser, Mike Hill, and Dean Hinesley performing the song “Roving Gambler,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR073: OHR Presents: Dom Flemons, 8/12/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Grammy award winning Oldtime singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist Dom Flemons, accompanied by the versatile Brian Farrow, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this Grammy award winning artist. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of country music royalty Jeanette Carter performing the classic song “Foggy Mountain Top.”

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Grammy award winning Oldtime singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist Dom Flemons, accompanied by the versatile Brian Farrow, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this Grammy award winning artist.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of country music royalty Jeanette Carter performing the classic song “Foggy Mountain Top.”

Raised in Phoenix, Arizona, Dom Flemons’ involvement with music began by playing percussion in his high school band.  After picking up the guitar and harmonica as a teenager, he began to play in local coffee houses and became a regular performer on the Arizona folk music scene.  Dom wrote his own songs and produced 25 albums of singer-songwriters and slam poets in the Phoenix area, including six albums of his own during this time.  He took a brief break from playing music in order to pursue slam poetry (he majored in English at Northern Arizona University) and performed in two national poetry slams in 2002 and 2003.  Aside from exploring slam poetry, he spent his early adulthood listening to records and discovering a love of folk music, blues, jazz, jug band music, country music and ‘50s rock ‘n’ roll.  Dom became interested in folk musicians such as Phil Ochs, Dave Van Ronk, and Mike Seeger, as well as musicians such as Mississippi John Hurt, Howlin’ Wolf, Hank Williams, Chuck Berry and Carl Perkins.  After stepping away from the slam poetry scene, he rekindled his interest in music, this time focusing on the old-time blues music of the pre-WWII era.

A multi-instrumentalist, Dom Flemons plays banjo, guitar, harmonica, fife, bones, bass drum, snare drum, and quills, in addition to singing.  He says that he incorporates his background in percussion to his banjo playing.  Dom’s banjo repertoire includes not only clawhammer but also tenor and three-finger styles of playing.  He first picked up the instrument when he borrowed a five-string banjo from a friend who had removed the instrument’s fifth string.  As a founding member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, an African-American string band, Dom was able to explore his interest in bringing traditional music to new audiences.  The band won a GRAMMY for its 2011 album Genuine Negro Jig and was nominated for its most recent album, Leaving Eden, in 2012.

Dom says he would like to use the traditional forms of music he has heard and immersed himself in over the years to create new soundscapes that generate interest in old-time folk music.  Focusing very much on creating music that is rooted in history but taking a contemporary approach, Dom hopes to reexamine what traditional music can become.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of country music royalty Jeanette Carter performing the classic song “Foggy Mountain Top,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR074: OHR Presents: Darol Anger & Mike Marshall, 8/19/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Oldtime, bluegrass, and psychograss pioneers Darol Anger & Mike Marshall recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these legendary instrumentalists. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bob & Kay Blair performing the traditional song “Red Green.”

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, oldtime, bluegrass, and psychograss pioneers Darol Anger & Mike Marshall recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these legendary instrumentalists.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bob & Kay Blair performing the traditional song “Red Green.”

Fiddler, composer, producer and educator,  Darol Anger is at home in a number of musical genres, some of which he helped to invent.  Exceptional among modern fiddlers for his versatility and depth, Anger has helped drive the evolution of the contemporary string band through his involvement with numerous pathbreaking ensembles such as his Republic Of Strings, the Turtle Island String Quartet, the David Grisman Quintet, Montreux, his Duo with Mike Marshall, and others.  He has performed and taught all over the world with musicians such as Dr. Billy Taylor, Bela Fleck, Bill Evans, Edgar Meyer, Bill Frisell, David Grisman, Tony Rice, Tim O’Brien, The Anonymous 4, Marin Alsop and the Cabrillo Orchestra, the Detroit Symphony, Mark O’Connor, and Stephane Grappelli.  Today Darol can be heard on NPR’s “Car Talk” theme every week, along with Earl Scruggs, David Grisman and Tony Rice. He was also the violinist on the phenomenally popular Sim City computer games.  In addition to performing all over the world, he has recorded and produced scores of important recordings since 1977, is a MacDowell and UCross Fellow, and has received numerous composers’ residencies and grants. He has been a featured soloist on dozens of recordings and motion picture soundtracks.  He is an Associate Professor at the Berklee School of music.  He recently began an ambitious online Fiddle School at ArtistWorks.com.

Mike Marshall made his Carnegie Hall debut at the age of 20 with jazz violin legend Stephane Grappelli as a member of the David Grisman Quartet. In 1985 he would perform in that famed hall with his own classical ensemble The Modern Mandolin Quartet in 1985.  Mike has been at the forefront of New Acoustic music for over 40 years having been the founding member of many groups including the Montreux Band, Psychograss, Choro Famoso and The Anger Marshall Band.  He is indeed a living compendium of musical styles and has the ability to seamlessly blend his American roots background with a deep understanding of European classical music, Brazilian choro and other world music.  Mike is a fluid Jazz improviser and a master on mandolin, guitar, mandocello and violin.  Between 1999 and 2003 Mike collaborated with Joshua Bell, Edgar Meyer, Bela Fleck and Sam Bush on two separate projects.  These groups toured the U.S.A. extensively and performed at the Aspen Music Festival, San Francisco Performances and Chamber Music at Lincoln Center, NY.  Both ensembles were nominated for Grammy Awards for their Sony Classical releases.  In 2014 Mike was nominated for his third Grammy Award for his recording with the Turtle Island Quartet.  Currently Mike is touring with German mandolin virtuoso Caterina Lichtenberg.  The two have released two cds on the Adventure Music label and have performed at the Carmel Bach Festival, The Savannah Music Festival, the Bach Haus Liepzig, Germany and the Rockygrass Bluegrass Festival in Colorado and have been soloists with the New Century Orchestra under Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, and Orchester l’arte del mondo from Cologne, Germany.  Mike’s past duet projects have included tours and Cds with mandolinists Chris Thile, violinist Darol Anger, bassist Edgar Meyer, Brazilian Mandolinist Hamilton de Holanda and pianists Jovino Santos Neto and Andy Narell. His recordings can be found on the Windham Hill, Sony Classical, Rounder, Sugar Hill and Compass labels as well his own Adventure Music label.  As a music educator Mike is committed to passing on his knowledge through a variety of channels. He currently directs the Mike Marshall School of Mandolin through the ArtistWorks on-line educational company where he is teaching hundreds of mandolinists from around the world. He has published six books on mandolin technique and has produced three video instruction DVDs.  Mike splits his time currently between his home in San Francisco, CA and Wuppertal, Germany where his wife, Caterina Lichtenberg holds the position of mandolin professor at the Cologne Music  Conservatory.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bob & Kay Blair performing the traditional song “Red Green,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR042: OHR Presents: "Sad Daddy", 8/26/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Original Ozark old time folk minstrels and songwriting group “Sad Daddy” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these interesting and innovative songwriters. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark legend Bookmiller Shannon, playing the traditional song “Shortnin’ Bread.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the first in a series of three Ozark Civil War Ballads, “The Battle of Wilson’s Creek.”

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, original Ozark old time folk minstrel and songwriting group “Sad Daddy” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these interesting and innovative songwriters.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark legend Bookmiller Shannon, playing the traditional song “Shortnin’ Bread.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the first in a series of three Ozark Civil War Ballads, “The Battle of Wilson’s Creek.”

Sad Daddy” combines the talents of four unique Arkansas musicians in one convenient package.  The group features Brian Martin on guitar, Melissa Carper on bass, Joe Sundell on banjo, and Rebecca Patek on fiddle.  Sad Daddy performs all original material, and their songs have the unique quality of sounding familiar yet new at the same time.  Music fans in these parts are notoriously very selective about “new” or “original” music.  Suffice it to say, Sad Daddy easily won over a tough room.  Oh, and the name?  Guitarist Brian Martin tells the story of an old Arkansas backwoods man who’s common refrain to something in less than a good state of operation….”that’s one Sad Daddy….” 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark legend and dance banjo maven Bookmiller Shannon, playing the traditional song “Shortnin’ Bread.” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the first of three Ozark Civil War ballads.  This episode features a 1958 archival recording of Doney Hammontree, singing the Ozark Civil War ballad “The Battle of Wilson’s Creek,”  A somewhat humorous ballad sung from the perspective of one of those German soldiers – the “Dutch” as their American neighbors mistakenly called them – “The Battle of Wilson’s Creek” is basically a battlefield variant of any number of songs poking fun at immigrants in the nineteenth century. The recording is preserved in the Max Hunter Collection at Missouri State University.

OHR011: OHR Presents: Danny Dozier, 9/2/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Original Ozark guitar wizard Danny Dozier recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Danny, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of prodigious Ozark folk balladeer Ollie Gilbert.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Ark.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments carry listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

On this week’s show, original Ozark guitar wizard Danny Dozier recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Danny, folklorist and author Charley Sandage offers an historical peregrination into Ozark culture, and Mark Jones presents an archival recording of Aunt Ollie Gilbert.

Danny Dozier is an Arkansas native and proud of it.  He is one of the area’s premier guitar players, well versed in the Merle Travis, “thumbpicking” style.  Danny has worked with a wide variety of performers over the years including; Grandpa and Ramona Jones, Omar and the Howlers and regional favorite, Leatherwoods.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and an enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode features a background on the founding the very first Arkansas Folk Festival.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment features a rare recording of prodigious Ozark folk balladeer Ollie Gilbert singing the traditional Ozark folk song “The Ballad of Cole Younger,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR Presents: The Jake Leg Stompers

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Bucksnort, Tennessee based old school Memphis style jug band the Jake Leg Stompers recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this band of musical outlaws. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of hammered dulcimer master Jay Round performing the traditional tune “Saint Anne’s Reel.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins explores the history of the Ozark Opry, one of the first old time barn dance music stage shows based in Springfield, Missouri.

Jake_leg_stompers_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Bucksnort, Tennessee based old school Memphis style jug band the Jake Leg Stompers recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this band of musical outlaws.

A Jake Leg Stompers show is a truly unique experience.  Like a Vaudeville party with all the bells and whistles.  Literally, their show includes bells and whistles.  With lively renditions of classic blues and jug band tunes from early 20th century American music and a theatrical sensibility, the Jake Leg Stompers will have you dancing in your seat.  The band’s performers include leader Hambone Willie Nevil on vocals, banjo, and guitar, Lela Mae Smith on vocals, Horatio Algernon Whiplash on washboard, snare, bells, and whistles, Jersey Slim Hawkins with fiddle, mandolin, and guitar, and Ramshackle Jack Dunshee on old time jug.

For more information about the Jake Leg Stompers…
http://www.jakelegstompers.com/about 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of hammered dulcimer master Jay Round performing the traditional tune “Saint Anne’s Reel,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins explores the history of the Ozark Opry, one of the first old time barn dance music stage shows based in Springfield, Missouri.

OHR Presents: Meredith Axelrod & Craig Ventresco

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

San Francisco based early 20th Century American music preservationist duo Meredith Axelrod & Craig Ventresco recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these time traveling minstrels. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Ulys Pilcher performing the traditional tune “Sally Goodin.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins explores the story of the Ozark Jubilee, one of America’s first nationally-broadcast old time barn dance country music television shows based in Springfield, Missouri.

Meredith_axelrod___craig_ventresco_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, San Francisco based early 20th Century American music preservationist duo Meredith Axelrod & Craig Ventresco recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these time traveling minstrels.

“Delightfully engaging and unassumingly comic, Meredith Axelrod envisions the limitless potential of early twentieth century music, whether it be Ragtime, Music Hall, Pop Standard, Boogie Woogie, Tin Pan Alley, String band, Jazz, Country, Blues or even Jug Band music, and embodies the spirit that brought the music into existence.  Her vocal style is unusual, probably because she learned to sing by listening to how folks did it a century ago – through the medium of cylinders and 78-rpm records.

The dominant theme throughout Meredith’s expansive repertoire is that, whatever the genre, these are songs she learns from the original sources (records and/or sheet music) which were released between the 1890s and the 1930s.  Part of the allure of old time music is hearing the original recordings as played and sung by the original performers in their heyday, loving what they’re doing and doing it because it means something to them in that moment.  Meredith brings the same unbridled passion, earnest devotion and candid vitality to all of her music.  She has found possibility and joy in the treasures of cultural folklore.

Meredith demonstratively loves the life she leads, thriving in varied musical and performance settings. She often partners with string virtuoso Craig Ventresco.  They perform at venues and festivals that include the San Francisco Silent Film Festival, West Coast Ragtime Festival, and Blind Boone Early Jazz Festival.” - https://meredithaxelrod.com/about/

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1976 archival recording of Ozark original Ulys Pilcher performing the traditional tune “Sally Goodin,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins explores the story of the Ozark Jubilee, one of America’s first nationally-broadcast old time barn dance country music television shows based in Springfield, Missouri.

OHR Presents: Charm City Junction

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Baltimore based Old Time string and Irish button accordion band Charm City Junction recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these masterful Maryland musicians. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Charley Sandage performing the traditional tune “Blacksmith of Brandywine.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins continues his exploration on the story of the Ozark Jubilee, one of America’s first nationally-broadcast old time barn dance country music television shows based in Springfield, Missouri.

Charm_city_junction_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Baltimore based Old Time string and Irish button accordion band Charm City Junction recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these masterful Maryland musicians.

“From dance inducing Old Time rhythms and foot stomping Irish melodies to hard-driving Bluegrass, Baltimore-based acoustic roots quartet Charm City Junction creates a fresh soundscape that keeps listeners on the edge of their seats wondering where they'll go next.  Featuring fiddle, clawhammer banjo, button accordion and upright bass, this quartet isn’t afraid to take roots music to new places — but always with an eye on tradition.

Formed in 2014, Charm City Junction has taken the acoustic music scene by storm performing around the country gaining high praise along the way for their high-energy, captivating and dynamic performances.  Bobby Britt takes charge with his virtuosic, powerful and musical approach to the fiddle.  Clawhammer banjo wizard Brad Kolodner adds his playful, driving, melodic and groovy Old-Time touch.  Sean McComiskey soars through the tunes and fills the gaps with his soulful button accordion playing. The versatile bassist Alex Lacquement drives the train, locking everything together with his commanding and tasteful choices.”
https://www.charmcityjunction.com/about.html

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1976 archival recording of Ozark original Charley Sandage performing the traditional tune “Blacksmith of Brandywine,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins continues his exploration on the story of the Ozark Jubilee, one of America’s first nationally-broadcast Old Time barn dance country music television shows, based in Springfield, Missouri.

OHR Presents: Newberry & Verch

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

International Oldtime string band and Ottawa Valley step dance duo Newberry & Verch recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this dynamic musical duo. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of his famous father, Grandpa Jones, telling the classic joke “Surprise Aunt Marthy.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles prolific Ozark musician Slim Wilson of the Ozark Jubilee, one of America’s first nationally-broadcast old time barn dance country music television shows based in Springfield, Missouri.

Newberry___verch_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, international Oldtime string band and Ottawa Valley step dance duo Newberry & Verch recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with this dynamic musical duo.

“Joe Newberry grew up in a family full of singers and dancers.  He took up the guitar and banjo as a  teenager and learned fiddle tunes from great Missouri fiddlers.  April Verch grew up listening to her Dad’s country band play for dances in the Ottawa Valley.  She started step dancing at age three and fiddling at age six. 

Both Newberry & Verch became masters of their traditions and tour the world with their respective bands and projects.  Yet they never forget the roots of their music, that connection to the people in the audience, on the dance floor, to the community sparked by a good song.  For these veteran performers who come from distinct traditions and parts of the world, their collaboration is fueled by their kindred passion for bringing people together to celebrate traditional music. 

Blues and ballads stem into Canadian regional styles and originals.  Their voices blend in harmony, their tasteful instrumentals prove that these masters have nothing left to prove, and then their feet kick up the dust in perfect rhythm…and together, they make you remember why this music existed in the first place.”
http://aprilverch.com/about/newberry-verch/

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1976 archival recording of his famous father, Grandpa Jones, telling the classic joke “Surprise Aunt Marthy.” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles prolific Ozark musician Slim Wilson of the Ozark Jubilee, one of America’s first nationally-broadcast Old Time barn dance country music television shows, based in Springfield, Missouri.

OHR Presents: The Bluegrastronauts

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

Blast off with the Matchsellers’ “Bluegrastronauts,” the world’s first outer-space bluegrass odyssey, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in scenic Mountain View, Arkansas. Mixing elements of tall tales, theater, science fiction and bluegrass, the Bluegrastonauts show isn’t quite like anything you’ve ever heard. Also, Mark Jones offers an archival recording of mountain dulcimer master David Schnaufer performing the traditional tune “Red Haired Boy.”

Bluegrastronauts_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, blast off with the Matchsellers’ “Bluegrastronauts,” the world’s first outer-space bluegrass odyssey, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Mixing elements of tall tales, theater, science fiction and bluegrass, the Bluegrastonauts show isn’t quite like anything you’ve ever heard. 

The Matchsellers are Warsaw, Indiana native Andrew Morris and Julie Bates of Kansas City, Missouri. Their exciting, gritty, and often hilarious stage show has been developed over six years of touring across the US and Europe.  Performing at the Ozark Folk Center State Park, Andrew and Julie present their outer-space bluegrass odyssey with a four piece stringband, featuring Chad Graves of The Hillbenders on dobro, and Betsey Mae on bass.  The group combines absurdity, authenticity, and excellent musicianship to create a performance that is representative of the present age:  They are pleasantly stuck between the years gone by and those to come.

The Matchsellers’ Bluegrastronauts is old-time in outer space.  It’s a far away galaxy as close as your first cousin.  It’s a 100,000-mile-an-hour horse and buggy.  Dressed as space travelers from the year 2437, the Matchsellers’ Bluegrastronauts take audiences through a musical “history of the future,” including a first-hand account of the Apocalypse of 2137, the subsequent colonization of the moon, and the dangers of playing hopscotch in deep space.  The show reaches the heights of absurdity while confronting deeply humanist issues of love, disillusionment, and mortality.  Prepare to travel through space and old-time with one of the most unique and ambitious acts in acoustic music today.
  - https://thematchsellers.com/bluegrastronauts-band/ 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1978 recording of mountain dulcimer master David Schnaufer performing the traditional tune “Red Haired Boy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR Presents: Josh Ritter

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio (Specials) series | 58:59

In this special episode, Ozark Highlands Radio partners with Oxford American Magazine to bring Woodstock, New York based contemporary folk and Americana superstar Josh Ritter, recorded live at South on Main in downtown Little Rock, Arkansas. Also, an interview with Oxford American Literary Project executive director Ryan Harris. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Karen Bell performing the classic tune “Grandfather’s Clock.”

Josh_ritter_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s historic 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, a special episode.  Ozark Highlands Radio partners with Oxford American Magazine to bring Woodstock, New York based contemporary folk and Americana superstar Josh Ritter, recorded live at South on Main in downtown Little Rock, Arkansas.  Also, an interview with Oxford American Literary Project executive director Ryan Harris.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Karen Bell performing the classic tune “Grandfather’s Clock.”

“The Oxford American is a nonprofit organization with a mission to explore the complexity and vitality of the American South through excellent writing, visual art, and events programming. Our quarterly print magazine was founded in 1992, and, in addition to winning four National Magazine Awards, has helped launch the writing careers of such noted authors as Jesmyn Ward and John Jeremiah Sullivan, while publishing beloved writers like Charles Portis, Nikky Finney, Peter Guralnick, and many others.

“Our concert series at South on Main in Little Rock is an extension of the magazine, creating meaningful opportunities for the community to experience the most culturally significant artists in our region.

“The OA has a longstanding history of curating great music. Our Winter 2018 issue is dedicated to the music of North Carolina. It is our twentieth installment of the series, which the Houston Chronicle calls "the single best music-related magazine of any given year." Each music issue comes with a sought-after CD, curated by the editors to showcase the region's hugely
varied musical legacy.”

More information about Oxford American programming, the magazine, and their mission can be found at
https://www.oxfordamerican.org

Moscow, Idaho born and currently Woodstock, New York based musician Josh Ritter is an American singer, songwriter, musician, and author who performs and records with the Royal City Band. Ritter is known for his distinctive Americana style and narrative lyrics. In 2006 he was named one of the "100 Greatest Living Songwriters" by Paste magazine.
-  https://www.joshritter.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1977 archival recording of Ozark original Karen Bell performing the classic tune “Grandfather’s Clock,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR002: OHR Presents: Dale Jett & "Hello Stranger", 9/16/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Carter Family legacy Dale Jett & "Hello Stranger" recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Dale Jett. Brooks Blevins: Ghost of the Ozarks Tale (Part 2,) and Mark Jones' "Vault" segment featuring The Simmons Family.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, 
Carter Family legacy Dale Jett & "Hello Stranger" recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with Dale Jett.  Brooks Blevins: Ghost of the Ozarks Tale (Part 2,) and Mark Jones' "Vault" segment featuring The Simmons Family. 

Dale Jett is a proud bearer of the Carter Family musical legacy. Son of Jeanette Carter and grandson of A.P. and Sara Carter, Dale performs songs from the Carter Family song book with his group “Hello Stranger.” With his wife Teresa on bass, and Oscar Harris on auto harp, Dale keeps the music of his family tradition alive and relevant.

Brooks Blevins provides a native’s view of the people, music, and colorful events that shape the Ozark region.  The author and historian presents the second of his three part series "Ghost of the Ozarks" about the infamous Connie Franklin murder trial.

Mark Jones' “From the Vault” segment features a recording of The Simmons Family singing the traditional song “Bright Morning Stars are Rising,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.  The segment also features a recent cut of the song done by Pam Setser (Simmons,) illustrating the legacy of music in Ozark culture.

OHR050: OHR Presents: The Quebe Sisters, 9/23/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Tuneful Texas trio the Quebe Sisters recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with the Quebe Sisters. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Betty Copeland singing a rare traditional gospel classic, “Life’s Railway to Heaven.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the third in a series of three Ozark regional ballads, “Little Johnny Lee.”

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, talented Texas trio The Quebe Sisters recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with the Quebe Sisters.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Betty Copeland singing a rare traditional gospel classic, “Life’s Railway to Heaven.”  Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the last in a series of three Ozark regional ballads, “Little Johnny Lee.”

Masters of Texas style swing, fiddle and three voice harmony, the Quebe (kway-bee) Sisters bring it like few can.  Like other family and sibling performers we’ve featured on Ozark Highlands Radio, the Quebe Sisters (Grace, Sophia and Hulda) have formed a sound and style that is both traditional and familiar, yet all their own.  Each sister an accomplished fiddle player and singer, the trio specializes in western swing tunes with their signature three part harmony.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original and family music legacy Betty Copeland singing a rare traditional gospel classic, “Life’s Railway to Heaven,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins presents the last of three episodes on Ozark regional ballads.  This episode features a recording of the traditional Ozark ballad “Little Johnny Lee,” sung by Bessie Owens of Batesville, Arkansas on April 6, 1958. The recording was made by folklorist Mary Parler, and is preserved in the Ozark Folksong Collection of the University of Arkansas Libraries Digital Collections.

OHR078: OHR Presents: “A.J. Croce: Two Generations of American Music”, 9/30/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

American singer-songwriter and musical legacy A.J. Croce recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, hear A.J. speak of getting to know his famous musical father, Jim Croce, through his inherited collection of personal archival recordings. “A.J. Croce: Two Generations of American Music,” is a blend of A.J’s own soulful music, his father’s enduring hit songs, and some of the music that they shared as influences, together. It is a glimpse into the life of one of America’s greatest songwriters and his equally talented progeny.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, American singer-songwriter and musical legacy A.J. Croce recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Hear A.J. speak of getting to know his famous musical father, Jim Croce, through his inherited collection of personal archival recordings.  “A.J. Croce: Two Generations of American Music,” is a blend of A.J’s own soulful music, his father’s enduring hit songs, and some of the music that they shared as influences, together.  It is a glimpse into the life of one of America’s greatest songwriters and his equally talented progeny.

Adrian James "A.J." Croce is an American singer-songwriter. He is the son of singer-songwriters Jim Croce and Ingrid Croce.  

“According to Willie Nelson, “A.J. Croce has wisdom beyond his years. With his music, he represents his generation with a profound sense of honesty in his lyrics and quality in his delivery. The future of entertainment is safe in his hands!”    

Some artists are afforded the chance to tell their personal stories as they see fit, at a particular moment when they know the time has come. But for many, there is no choice — the story emerges hardwired to the music and they become forever identified with it no matter how their story may evolve or change.

A.J. Croce has been inextricably linked to a version of his own story by virtue of his name. He’s experienced a lifetime of comparisons to a father he lost at age two, whose music bears little resemblance to his own output yet still serves as a reference point despite the years that have passed and the many iconic mentors who have stepped in to offer their counsel, creativity, and endorsement throughout his long career.

It’s curious that it now feels necessary to include the reference, as enough time has passed that a new generation of tastemakers and journalists might not know who Jim Croce was — that he was a golden-voiced everyman, a singer-songwriter-guitarist who died too soon, leaving one of pop music’s most beautiful and memorable ballads (written about a young A.J.) in his wake.

Croce the younger, on the other hand, is a piano man, first and foremost, and a vocal stylist second. His muted growl pulls from a host of American traditions and anti-heroes — it’s part New Orleans, part juke joint, part soul, but somehow evokes New York, a continuum where John Lurie meets Lou Reed. He is further a songwriter, driven by a personal muse, informed by a life on a boomerang of tragedy.”

-https://www.ajcrocemusic.com

OHR060: OHR Presents: Jerron "Blind Boy" Paxton, 10/7/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Old time blues, jazz, & traditional music prodigy Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Jerron. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark legend Bookmiller Shannon performing the song “The Banks of the Ohio.” Old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles traditional Ozark fiddler Absie Morrison.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, old time blues, jazz, & traditional music prodigy Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with Jerron.

Jerron "Blind Boy" Paxton is an American musician from Los Angeles.  A vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, Paxton's style draws from blues and jazz music before World War II and was influenced by Fats Waller and "Blind" Lemon Jefferson.  According to Will Friedwald in the Wall Street Journal, Paxton is "virtually the only music-maker of his generation—playing guitar, banjo, piano and violin, among other implements—to fully assimilate the blues idiom of the 1920s and '30s, the blues of Bessie Smith and Lonnie Johnson.”

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark legend Bookmiller Shannon performing the traditional murder ballad “The Banks of the Ohio,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Fine Fiddlers of the Ozarks,” old time and Ozark fiddle aesthete Roy Pilgrim profiles traditional Ozark fiddler Absie Morrison.  This installment features archival recordings of the traditional Ozark fiddle tunes “Dry & Dusty, The Concord March, and The Ozark Waltz.”

OHR110: OHR Presents: John McEuen & The String Wizards, 10/14/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

World renowned Grammy award winning musician, producer, writer, filmmaker, and founding member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, John McEuen with his String Wizards recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this prolific performer. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of his father, country music icon Grandpa Jones performing the classic song “Mountain Dew.”

John_mceuen_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, world renowned Grammy award winning musician, producer, writer, filmmaker, and founding member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, John McEuen with his String Wizards recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this prolific creator and performer.

“John McEuen has been a ‘professional performer’ since 1962, working as a magician in Disneyland’s Magic Shop as a teenager.  Music soon came along, which led to his long and varied career first solo, then as a founding member of the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band in 1966.  Over 10,000 concerts and 300 television shows throughout more than 3 million miles - with the band and as a solo performer - John has pursued his passion for performing and recording.  John left NGDB at the end of their 50th year touring to focus on the demand for his solo performing and projects.  Beyond performing, he concurrenty has a rich history of creating, producing and preserving original and traditional folk and acoustic music, and taking it to new audiences.

"He brings his guitar, banjo, fiddle, and mandolin along with favorite NGDB songs and the stories behind them to the stage in a manner that earned the honored Best in the West Award from the Folk Alliance Organization.

"McEuen has made over 40 albums (7 solo) that have earned four platinum and five gold recognition awards, Grammy nominations, CMA and ACM awards, an Emmy nomination, IBMA record of the year award, and performed on another 25 albums as guest artist. He's also produced another 7 albums, and 14 film scores (two Emmy nominated shows) and more than 300 concerts throughout his career - the first in 1965 in Long Beach Calif., with Bob Dylan.

"His production of Steve Martin - The Crow won the 2010 Best Bluegrass Album Grammy.  Prior to that, The Music of the Wild West CD- produced by McEuen, was honored with the Western Heritage Award. A Grammy nomination for String Wizards II preceded the1994 Uncle Dave Macon Award for his excellence in preservation and performance of historic music.  On Sirius/XM's The Bridge, John's popular Acoustic Traveller show is now in its 9th year.  McEuen produced and directed the 2006 documentary film The Dillards - A Night In the Ozarks, which captures his early mentors at their best.

"In April of 2018 John officially became an author, with his first book The Life I’ve Picked being published (On Chicago Review Press).  A memoire, a telling of incredible stories from raising 6 kids in the music business and the ins and outs of being an iconic band member to being a single father to his current full and varied career, his book takes the reader on his unusual journey.

"In September of 2017 John was inducted in to the American Banjo Museum Hall of Fame.
McEuen's countless jams include street performers to Phish, Earl Scruggs, Levon Helm… and even on Sesame Street with a herd of goats and a cow!  Arguably, McEuen's most important legacy may be his initiating what Rolling Stone called 'The most important record to come out of Nashville' and what the 2004 ZAGAT survey called 'the most important record in country music' - Will the Circle Be Unbroken."
http://www.johnmceuen.com/biography.html

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1973 archival recording of his father, country music icon Grandpa Jones performing the classic song “Mountain Dew,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR067: OHR Presents: Anna & Elizabeth, 10/21/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Prodigious purveyors of the past, multi-instrumentalists, singers and story tellers, Anna & Elizabeth recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these unique performers. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals The Hall Family singing the traditional song “Cowboy’s Dream.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of world famous cowboy poet & singer Glenn Orhlin.

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Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, prodigious purveyors of the past, multi-instrumentalists, singers and story tellers, Anna & Elizabeth recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these unique performers.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals The Hall Family, performing the traditional song “Cowboy’s Dream.”  Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents a portrait of world famous cowboy poet & singer Glenn Orhlin.

The collaboration between Anna & Elizabeth spans worlds — between their homes in Brooklyn and rural Virginia -- between deep study of mountain ballads with old masters and explorations into the avant garde — between music, performance, and visual art.  Anna & Elizabeth have performed across the country and in Europe.  Highlights include: The Newport Folk Festival; NPR's Tiny Desk Concert; The Chicago Folk Festival; The High Museum of Modern Art (Atlanta); and the Cambridge Folk Festival (UK.)  Their work has been featured on BBC Radio 2 and BBC3's Late Junction, Vice’s Noisey, the Huffington Post, and No Depression. They have shared the stage with Alice Gerrard, Mick Moloney, Sam Lee and Riley Baugus, Bruce Greene, Abigail Washburn, Wayne Henderson, and also National Heritage Award winners Sheila Kay Adams and Billy McComiskey.

Elizabeth Laprelle lives on a farm in Rural Retreat, Virginia, where she grew up, and  has pursued her interest in mountain ballads for over a decade.  Since the release of her debut album at age 16, she’s been hailed as one of the most dedicated students of the traditional unaccompanied style of her generation.  The student of master singer Ginny Hawker and National Heritage Fellow Sheila Kay Adams, Elizabeth was the first recipient of the Henry Reed Award from the Library of Congress at age 16, and won the 2012 Mike Seeger Award at Folk Alliance International.  She has released three solo ballad albums, and was called “the best young Appalachian ballad singer to emerge in recent memory” by UK’s fRoots Magazine. 

Anna Roberts-Gevalt is a voracious and curious multi-instrumentalist originally from Vermont, described by Meredith Monk as a "radiant being."  She fell in love with the sound of banjo in college, moved to the mountains, and learned with master musicians in Kentucky, Virginia, and North Carolina, becoming a blue-ribbon fiddler and banjo player (WV State Folk Fest, Kentucky Fiddle Contest.)  She was a fellow at the Berea College Archive, a 2014 OneBeat fellow (Bang on a Can's Found Sound Nation,) artistic director of Kentucky’s traditional music institute, the Cowan Creek Mountain Music School, and curator of Baltimore's Crankie Festival.  She has recently delved into new musical worlds, including recent work with composers Brian Harnetty, Nate May and Cleek Schrey, Matmos, David Rothenberg, Susan Alcorn, and saxophonist Jarrett Gilgore.  She has contributed writing to No Depression and The Old Time Herald.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals The Hall Family, performing the traditional song “Cowboy’s Dream,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events, and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  This episode focuses on world renowned cowboy poet, balladeer, and story teller Glenn Orhlin.

OHR090: OHR Presents: Marty Stuart & The Fabulous Superlatives, 10/28/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Five time Grammy Award winning traditional country, bluegrass, & Americana music legend Marty Stuart and his band, The Fabulous Superlatives, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Marty. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of himself & Marty Stuart performing the song “The Train That Carried My Girl From Town.”

Marty_stuart_pic_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, five time Grammy Award winning traditional country, bluegrass, & Americana music legend Marty Stuart and his band, The Fabulous Superlatives, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Marty.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of himself & Marty Stuart performing the song “The Train That Carried My Girl From Town.”

Marty Stuart is an American country music singer-songwriter & multi-instrumentalist, known for both his traditional style, and eclectic merging of rockabilly, honky tonk, and traditional country music.  As a musical child prodigy, Marty grew up playing with some of the greatest names in bluegrass & country music.  His early career saw him working with Lester Flatt, Vassar Clements, Doc Watson, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins, Jerry Lee Lewis, Porter Wagoner, and many others.  As an adult, Stuart launched a successful solo career that has spanned 30 years, and garnered five Grammy Awards.  He has appeared on numerous TV shows including Hee Haw, The Nashville Network, and his own show “The Marty Stuart Show.”  These days, he tours & records with his band “The Fabulous Superlatives,” featuring Kenny Vaughan on lead and acoustic guitar, Harry Stinson on drums and background vocals, and Chris Scruggs on electric, acoustic, steel and bass guitars, and background vocals.
https://www.martystuart.net

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1980 archival recording of himself & Marty Stuart performing the song “The Train That Carried My Girl From Town,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR099: OHR Presents: Brian Martin, 11/4/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Award winning True Folk & Americana singer-songwriter Brian Martin, recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Brian. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Pam Branscum performing the traditional tune “Goodbye Liza Jane.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater discusses the concept of percussive singing in traditional as well as modern musics.

Brian_martin_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, award winning True Folk & Americana singer-songwriter Brian Martin, recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with Brian.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Pam Branscum performing the traditional tune “Goodbye Liza Jane.”  Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater discusses the concept of percussive singing in traditional as well as modern musics.

“While keeping one foot planted firmly in the roots of American music, singer/songwriter Brian Martin is forging a distinct path into its future as well.  Interweaving old-time country blues and mountain folk music with southern soul, funk and gospel, Martin seamlessly creates a style that he simply refers to as "front porch soul."  His burly voice and down home witty tales result in music that is both alluring and enduring for generations young and old.
 
Hailing from southern Arkansas, Martin begin the journey of a full time performing musician in 2004.  He spent years crafting new songs and developing his sound through constant touring around Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas, while building a devoted fan base along the way.  He released his solo debut album "No Rider" in 2011.  Offering many of his fan favorite songs, "No Rider" highlights Martin's gritty soulful voice and intricate acoustic guitar finger picking, resulting in a theme collection of intimate, and at times, haunting folk songs.

In addition to his solo performances, Martin also performs with Sad Daddy, a popular folk swing band he co-founded in 2010 with Melissa Carper on upright bass and Joe Sundell on the banjo.  The trio recorded their self titled debut album in 2010 and toured extensively over the next few years, before taking a hiatus to work on other projects.  The band has since added violinist Rebecca Patek to the lineup and released their follow up album "Fresh Catch" in 2016.  With the new lineup intact, Sad Daddy has been out and about, sharing the new songs with old favorites, while keeping fans singing and dancing along the way.”
https://www.brianmartinmusic.com/home

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1979 archival recording of Ozark original Pam Branscum performing the traditional tune “Goodbye Liza Jane,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater discusses the concept of percussive singing in traditional as well as modern musics.  She offers examples of how this odd musical phenomenon has, and continues to pervade music from all over the world.

OHR103: OHR Presents: Songs Not So Serious, 11/11/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Songs not so serious, both modern and traditional, performed by various artists recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Folk music is often thought of as being either dark and serious or naive and childish. Not so with this collection of artists and songs. In this episode, explore with us a lighter side of folk. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Kenneth Rorie performing the traditional song “In the Pines.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater discusses traditional songs that are unmetered & crooked and do not fit into our common ideas about rhythm.

Antsy_mcclain_1_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, songs not so serious, both modern and traditional, performed by various artists recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Folk music is often thought of as being either dark and serious or naive and childish.  Not so with this collection of artists and songs.  In this episode, explore with us a lighter side of folk.  Featured on this episode are a variety of artists including Antsy McClain, the Buffalo Gals, Bill & the Belles, Muriel Anderson, David Holt & Josh Goforth, Mike Snider, Jimmy Driftwood, the Hogslop Stringband, and Jerron Paxton.  We’ll hear their most humorous songs, both traditional and modern, many of them written by the artists themselves. 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1979 archival recording of Ozark original Kenneth Rorie performing the traditional song “In the Pines,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater discusses traditional songs that are unmetered & crooked and do not fit into our common ideas about rhythm.  Hear Aubrey as she dares us to try and dance to these crooked tunes.

OHR101: OHR Presents: Pam Setser, 11/18/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Stone county native, Ozark original, and our very own traditional Ozark folk legend Pam Setser, recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this Ozark icon. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of another Ozark icon, Almeda Riddle, performing the traditional tune “Pretty Peggy-O.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater waxes poetic in a discussion about songs of undying love.

Pam_setser_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Stone county native, Ozark original, and our very own traditional folk legend Pam Setser, recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this Ozark icon.  Mark Jones offers an archival recording of another Ozark icon, Almeda Riddle, performing the traditional tune “Pretty Peggy-O.”  Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater waxes poetic in a discussion about songs of undying love.

Pam Setser is an award winning multi-instrumentalist extraordinaire.  It's not just her musical talent that will catch your heart but her angelic voice as well.  Setser has played at many venues including Louisiana Hayride, Hee Haw, The Ralph Emery Show, Jay Leno, and You Can Be A Star.  Not to mention playing in Washington D.C. for President Clinton, and winning third place in the National Wrangler Country Showdown at the Grand Old Opry in Nashville, Tennessee.  From the first time you here Pam Setser perform, you will want to hear her again and again.
http://pamsetser.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1979 archival recording of Ozark folk icon Almeda Riddle, performing the traditional tune “Pretty Peggy-O,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater waxes poetic in her discussion about songs of undying love.  The segment features the most beautiful of all love songs ever conceived, “The Blackest Crow.”

OHR105: OHR Presents: Songs out of Style, 11/25/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Songs out of style, performed by various artists recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Songs can transcend musical styles and those styles can also transcend their traditional songs. “Songs out of Style” explores the movement of great songs, both old and modern, across musical genres. We’ll hear traditional songs made new again and modern songs remade in the old ways. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a very young Ozark original, Dwight Moody, performing the song “In the Pines.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater presents the peregrination of a song, following the journey of traditional song “Loving Hannah” from Ireland to America and back again.

Steel_wheels_sandlin_gaither_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, songs out of style performed by various artists recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Songs can transcend musical styles and those styles can also transcend their traditional songs.  “Songs out of Style” explores the movement of great songs, both old and modern, across musical genres.  We’ll hear traditional songs made new again, and modern songs remade in the old ways.

Artists featured on “Songs out of Style” include bluegrass sensation The Barefoot Movement, experimental acoustic ensemble Jayme Stone & The Lomax Project - featuring Moira Smiley, amazing sibling duo The Vogts Sisters, renowned traditional music explorers Anna & Elizabeth, internet star & hammered dulcimer Jedi Ted Yoder, mountain dulcimer world champion Jeff Hames, mountain dulcimer guru & musical mad scientist Bing Futch & Co, Red Wing Roots Music Festival founders & old-time supergroup The Steel Wheels, as well as old-time music masters, comedians, and all-around hooligans The Hogslop String Band.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of a very young Ozark original, Dwight Moody, performing the song “In the Pines,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.  “In the Pines” is a traditional American song that was remade into a modern hit in 1993 by the grunge rock band Nirvana as “Where Did You Sleep Last Night.”

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater explores the peregrination of a song, following the journey of traditional song “Loving Hannah” from Ireland to America and back again.  Aubrey presents various artists’ versions of the song including herself, Mary Black, Carrie Norris, and Jean Ritchie with her son Jon Pickow.

OHR106: OHR Presents: Banjo Time!, 12/2/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

It’s Banjo Time! Join host Dave Smith and banjo royalty Mark Jones as they explore music of the banjo. From its ancient African roots, we’ll follow the banjo’s transition from a slave instrument into the mainstream of American popular and folk musics. Mark and Dave will guide us through performances by various banjo masters covering a myriad of styles into which the banjo has evolved, all recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Mark Jones also offers an archival recording of ubiquitous Ozark banjo legend Bookmiller Shannon performing the tune “Shortnin’ Bread.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater presents “The African American Banjo,” illuminating the African roots of this enduring musical instrument.

Hubby_jenkins_banjo_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, it’s “Banjo Time!”  Join host Dave Smith and banjo royalty Mark Jones as they explore music of the banjo. From its ancient African roots, we’ll follow the banjo’s transition from a slave instrument into the mainstream of American popular and folk musics.  Mark and Dave will guide us through performances by various banjo masters covering a myriad of styles into which the banjo has evolved, all recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.

Artists featured on this week’s show include Country Music Hall of Fame member & “Hee Haw" star Grandpa Jones, master of traditional African American banjo Jerron ‘Blind Boy’ Paxton, Carolina Chocolate Drops member Hubby Jenkins, Ozark original Uncle Floyd Holland, connoisseurs of classic sheet music and banjo duo Clark Bueling & Carl Anderton, songwriter and banjo frailing ninja Jimmy Connors, fresh-faced banjo slinging madman Samuel Blake, preeminent bluegrass virtuoso Adam Fudge, our very own Mark Jones, Berklee School of Music banjo pioneer Lukas Pool, up and coming clawhammer champion Lillyanne McCool, classic country music and banjo superstar Buck Trent, and the inimitable Paul Brock Band featuring banjo shredders Dave Curley & Shane Farrell.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of ubiquitous Ozark banjo legend Bookmiller Shannon performing the tune “Shortnin’ Bread,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.  Bookmiller traveled America with famed Ozark songwriter and folklorist Jimmy Driftwood in the 1960’s and 70’s, bringing the Ozark style of clawhammer banjo into greater awareness.

In this week’s guest host segment, renowned traditional folk musician, writer, and step dancer Aubrey Atwater explores “The African American Banjo,” illuminating the African roots of this enduring musical instrument.  Aubrey takes us back to the source of the banjo with musical examples and enlightening commentary.

OHR108: OHR Presents: The Seldom Scene, 12/9/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Legendary Grammy nominated Bethesda, Maryland progressive bluegrass super-group The Seldom Scene recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this enduring and enigmatic group of bluegrass pioneers. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Bob Atchison performing the traditional tune “Bull at the Wagon.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater presents “Ballads That End Well,” proving that folk ballads don’t always end with a grizzly horrifying death.

Seldom_scene_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, legendary Grammy nominated Bethesda, Maryland progressive bluegrass super-group The Seldom Scene recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with this enduring and enigmatic group of bluegrass pioneers.

“The Seldom Scene is an American bluegrass band formed in 1971 in Bethesda, Maryland. The Scene has been instrumental in starting the progressive bluegrass movement as their shows include bluegrass versions of country music, rock, and even pop. What does it take for a bluegrass band to remain popular for more than four decades? For The Seldom Scene, it's taken not only talented musicians, a signature sound, and a solid repertoire, but also a sheer sense of fun.”
- https://www.seldomscene.com/band/ 

For almost fifty years, The Seldom Scene has been a staple of the American bluegrass landscape.  Their innovative approach to this traditional genre has brought bluegrass music to an ever widening audience.  While paying homage to the genre with traditional instrumentation & harmony singing, The Seldom Scene cleverly apply a fresh coat of bluegrass bent to seemingly any kind of song they choose.  Along with traditional bluegrass songs, rock, country, pop, and even classical music are reimagined into fresh masterpieces.

Although the lineup of The Seldom Scene has changed slightly over the decades, the sound and spirit of the group has endured.  Today, they are Dudley Connell on guitar, Lou Reid manning mandolin & guitar, Ron Stewart taking on banjo & fiddle, Fred Travers on dobro, and Ronnie Simpkins holding up the bottom end on bass.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1983 archival recording of Ozark original Bob Atchison performing the traditional fiddle tune “Bull at the Wagon,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater presents “Ballads That End Well,” proving that folk ballads don’t always end with a grizzly horrifying death.

OHR107: OHR Presents: The Secret Sisters, 12/23/2019

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Grammy nominated Muscle Shoals Americana & contemporary bluegrass singer-songwriter mega-duo The Secret Sisters, recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these superlative siblings. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of autoharp master Ron Wall performing the traditional tune “Home Sweet Home.” Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater presents “Devil Songs,” illuminating the dark angel’s appearance in generations of traditional folk songs.

Secret_sisters_abraham_rowe_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Grammy nominated Muscle Shoals Americana & contemporary bluegrass singer-songwriter mega-duo The Secret Sisters, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these superlative siblings.

The Secret Sisters are an Americana singing and songwriting duo consisting of vocalists Laura Rogers and Lydia Slagle.  The sisters’ music has been compared to artists like The Everly Brothers.  Laura and Lydia are from Muscle Shoals, Alabama.  With a love for music coming from both sides of their family (their grandfather and his brothers forged a group called The Happy Valley Boys,) they grew up with a zeal for country music and sang songs with their family by country music artists such as Don Williams. The girls first learned to harmonize through singing a cappella at their hometown church.

The sisters have produced three albums.  Their third album, “You Don’t Own Me Anymore” produced by Brandi Carlile, received the duo’s first Grammy nomination.  Aside from touring the world with their unique brand of Southern story telling and impeccable harmonies, the Secret Sisters have appeared on The Late Show with David Letterman, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, and have a song featured on the movie soundtrack for “The Hunger Games.”

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1983 archival recording of autoharp master Ron Wall performing the traditional tune “Home Sweet Home,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Writer, musician, and traditional dancer Aubrey Atwater presents “Devil Songs.”  Aubrey will guide us through the dark angel’s appearance in generations of traditional folk songs with musical examples and her own cultivated insight.

OHR111: OHR Presents: Lula Wiles, 1/6/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Smithsonian Folkways recording artists and award winning Boston, Massachusetts progressive folk trio “Lula Wiles” recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these bright Boston bards. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original fiddler, Roger Fountain, performing the traditional tune “Saint Anne’s Reel.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage asks the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

Lula_wiles_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s historic 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Smithsonian Folkways artists and award winning Boston, Massachusetts progressive folk trio “Lula Wiles” recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these bright Boston bards.

Lula Wiles is a Boston based progressive folk trio consisting of Isa Burke, Eleanor Buckland, and Mali Obomsawin.  Their blending of instrumental virtuosity, intricate three part harmony singing, and visionary songwriting has quickly ushered them to the forefront of modern American contemporary folk music.  With the recent release of their Smithsonian Folkways album “What Will We Do,” the trio now joins the ranks of America’s most important folk artists. 

“Long before they were in a band together, the members of Lula Wiles were singing folk songs and trading fiddle tunes at camp in Maine.  ‘All of us were lucky to have access to the folk music community at a young age,’ Burke says. “The music traditions that we’re drawing on are social, community-building traditions.” On those warm summer nights, playing music was just plain fun. But the members of Lula Wiles carry those early lessons of community and the meaning of shared art with them to this day, as they seek to create music that questions cultural virtues, soothes aching wounds, and envisions a better world.

“Lula Wiles came of age in Boston, in the practice rooms of Berklee College of Music and the city’s lively roots scene. In 2016, the band self-released Lula Wiles, a sensitive, twang-tinged collection of originals. Since then, they have toured internationally, winning fans at the Newport Folk Festival and the Philadelphia Folk Festival, and sharing stages with the likes of Aoife O’Donovan, the Wood Brothers, and Tim O’Brien.

“Now, the release of What Will We Do on Smithsonian Folkways Recordings places the group squarely in line with some of its deepest influences, from the protest anthems of Woody Guthrie to the trailblazing songs of Elizabeth Cotten and Hazel Dickens. (Even the band’s name is a twist on an old Carter Family song.)” - http://www.lulawiles.com/bio/ 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1983 archival recording of Ozark original fiddler, Roger Fountain, performing the traditional tune “Saint Anne’s Reel,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  In this episode, Charley speaks with environmentalist and author Richard Mason on the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

OHR112: OHR Presents: Mandolin Orange, 1/20/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

In this special episode, Ozark Highlands Radio partners with Oxford American Magazine to bring Chapel Hill, North Carolina based rising contemporary folk and Americana superstars “Mandolin Orange,” recorded live at South on Main in downtown Little Rock, Arkansas. Also, an interview with Oxford American Literary Project executive director Ryan Harris. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Pat & Bob Momich performing the traditional tune “Soldier’s Joy.”

Mandolin_orange_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s historic 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, a very special episode.  Ozark Highlands Radio partners with Oxford American Magazine to bring Chapel Hill, North Carolina based rising contemporary folk and Americana superstars “Mandolin Orange,” recorded live at South on Main in downtown Little Rock, Arkansas.  Also, an interview with Oxford American Literary Project executive director Ryan Harris.  Mandolin Orange are joined in this performance by Eli West on guitar & banjo, Josh Oliver on electric guitar, Clint Mulligan on Bass, and Joe Westerlund on drums.

“The Oxford American is a nonprofit organization with a mission to explore the complexity and vitality of the American South through excellent writing, visual art, and events programming. Our quarterly print magazine was founded in 1992, and, in addition to winning four National Magazine Awards, has helped launch the writing careers of such noted authors as Jesmyn Ward and John Jeremiah Sullivan, while publishing beloved writers like Charles Portis, Nikky Finney, Peter Guralnick, and many others.

“Our concert series at South on Main in Little Rock is an extension of the magazine, creating meaningful opportunities for the community to experience the most culturally significant artists in our region.

“The OA has a longstanding history of curating great music. Our Winter 2018 issue is dedicated to the music of North Carolina. It is our twentieth installment of the series, which the Houston Chronicle calls "the single best music-related magazine of any given year." Each music issue comes with a sought-after CD, curated by the editors to showcase the region's hugely
varied musical legacy.”

More information about Oxford American programming, the magazine, and their mission can be found at
https://www.oxfordamerican.org 

“Mandolin Orange is an Americana/folk duo based out of Chapel Hill, North Carolina.The group was formed in 2009 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and consists of the group's songwriter Andrew Marlin (vocals, mandolin, guitar, banjo) and Emily Frantz (vocals, violin, guitar). Mandolin Orange has produced five albums of Marlin's original works of American roots music. In the last three years, the group has toured throughout the U.S and Europe, including appearances at Austin City Limits, South-by-Southwest, Telluride Bluegrass Festival, Newport Folk Festival, Pickathon, and Merlefest. They signed to Yep Roc Records in 2013 and have produced four albums under their umbrella, This Side of Jordan, Such Jubilee, Blindfaller and Tides of a Teardrop.”

Learn more about Mandolin Orange at
-  http://www.mandolinorange.com/#home-section 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1981 archival recording of Ozark originals Pat & Bob Momich performing the traditional tune “Soldier’s Joy,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR117: OHR Presents: Taj Mahal, 2/3/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

World renowned three-time Grammy winning singer, songwriter, film composer, guitarist, multi-instrumentalist, founding member of the band Rising Sons, and Blues legend Taj Mahal recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of another Grammy winner, Americana and country folk icon John Prine performing his classic song “Paradise.”

Taj_mahal_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, world renowned three-time Grammy winning singer, songwriter, film composer, guitarist, multi-instrumentalist, founding member of the band “Rising Sons,” and Blues legend Taj Mahal recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.

Henry St. Claire Fredericks Jr, better known as “Taj Mahal,” is an American blues musician, a singer-songwriter and film composer who plays the guitar, piano, banjo, harmonica, and many other instruments.  Taj incorporates elements of world music into his works and has done much to reshape the definition and scope of blues music by fusing it with nontraditional forms including sounds from the Caribbean, Africa, and the South Pacific.

Accompanied here by bassist Bill Rich and drummer Kester Smith, Taj Mahal takes us on a musical journey like no other.  Raised between two very different musical traditions, the American gospel of his mother and the Caribbean jazz influences of his father, Taj takes his music into unique and interesting territory.  This journey has taken him around the world with a career spanning over five decades.  In addition to being one of America’s greatest cultural treasures, Taj Mahal has garnered three Grammy Awards, a Blues Music Award, an honorary doctorate, and the Americana Music Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

“What inspires me most about my career is that I’ve been able to make a living playing the music that I always loved and wanted to play since the early 50s,” Mahal says. “And the fact that I still am involved in enjoying an exciting career at this point in time is truly priceless. I’m doing this the old fashioned way and it ain’t easy. I work it and I earn it.  My relationship with my audience has been fun, with great respect going both ways! I am extremely lucky to have fans who have listened to the music I choose to play and have stayed with me for 50 years. These fans have also introduced their children, grandchildren and in some cases great-grand children to this fabulous treasure of music that I am privileged to represent. It’s very exciting, to say the least.

“Like ancient culture,” he adds, “the people are as much a part of the performance as the music. Live communication through music, oh yeah, it’s right up there with oxygen!” - http://www.tajblues.com

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1976 archival recording of another three time Grammy winner and Americana Music Association Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, country folk icon John Prine performing his classic song “Paradise” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR114: OHR Presents: Hannah Shira Naiman, 2/17/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Toronto singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and CFMA “Traditional Singer of the Year” Hannah Shira Naiman recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Hannah. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of his mom and sister, Ramona & Alisa Jones, performing the Buck White tune “Down Home Waltz.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage asks the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

Hannah_shira_naiman_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s historic 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Toronto singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and CFMA “Traditional Singer of the Year” Hannah Shira Naiman recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with this captivating Canadian.  Performing with Hannah on this show is her father, famed Canadian banjoist Arnie Naiman.

“Named ‘Traditional Singer of the Year' (2017) by the CFMAs, Hannah Shira Naiman’s banjo-grounded songs dance the listener into the Appalachian mountains and eras back in time, drawing on her roots in Toronto’s ‘old time’ folk music community to share powerful tales of hope and loss.
 
“With a sound that’s been described as a cross between Gillian Welch and Sarah Harmer, Naiman crafts original songs that ring with influences of Ola Belle Reed, The Carter Family, American oldtime, and traditional English ballads.
 
“Naiman grew up around folk music as her celebrated banjo-playing father, Arnie Naiman, and award-winning children’s musician mother, Kathy Reid-Naiman, brought her to numerous folk camps and festivals every year.  But it wasn’t until she left home that Hannah began to explore her father’s instrument in a new way.  Collaborating with vocalist Emily Adam as part of folk duo The Blackest Crow sparked a more serious interest in making music.” - http://www.hannahshiranaiman.com/bio-press

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1981 archival recording of his mom and sister, Ramona & Alisa Jones performing the Buck White tune “Down Home Waltz,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  In this episode, Charley speaks with author Tom Dillard on the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

OHR115: OHR Presents: The Western Flyers, 3/2/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Texas based 2017 Ameripolitan 'Western Swing Group of the Year’ The Western Flyers recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this talented Texas trio. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark originals Bob Hayes & Bud Bell performing the traditional tune “I’ll Fly Away.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage asks the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

Western_flyers_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s historic 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Texas based 2017 Ameripolitan 'Western Swing Group of the Year’ The Western Flyers recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with this talented Texas trio.

The Texas trio The Western Flyers consists of Joey McKenzie on guitar and vocals, Katie Glassman on fiddle and vocals, and Gavin Kelso on upright bass and vocals.  Both Joey and Katie being world class fiddlers along with Gavin’s mastery of swing & jazz bass, you won’t find better Western Swing music anywhere this side of the Pecos.

“The Western Flyers are one of the most exciting new bands to glide onto the music scene in years.  Their music is a distinctive cross section of the Great American Songbook: authentic Western swing, hot jazz and swing standards, cowboy songs, and electrifying old-time fiddle tunes.  Internationally renowned guitar master Joey McKenzie drives the train with his powerful rhythm, while reigning National Swing Fiddle champion Katie Glassman and world-class upright bassist Gavin Kelso add fuel to the fire.  A blending of tradition and innovation, The Western Flyers are a singular musical experience; a fresh take on a venerable American art form performed by three Western swing virtuosos.”
- https://www.facebook.com/twflyers/ 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1976 archival recording of Ozark originals Bob Hayes & Bud Bell performing the traditional tune “I’ll Fly Away,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

Author, folklorist and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  In this episode, Charley speaks with author and herbalist Tina Marie Wilcox on the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

OHR118: OHR Presents: Amythyst Kiah, 3/16/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

In this special episode, Ozark Highlands Radio partners with Oxford American Magazine to bring Johnson City, Tennessee based up & coming contemporary folk and Americana superstar Amythyst Kiah, recorded live at South on Main in downtown Little Rock, Arkansas. Also, an interview with Oxford American Literary Project executive director Ryan Harris. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Aunt Ollie Gilbert performing the ballad “Springtime in Alaska.”

Amythyst_kiah_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s historic 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, a very special episode.  Ozark Highlands Radio partners with Oxford American Magazine to bring Johnson City, Tennessee based up & coming contemporary folk and Americana superstar Amythyst Kiah, recorded live at South on Main in downtown Little Rock, Arkansas.  Also, an interview with Oxford American Literary Project executive director Ryan Harris.  In this performance, Amythyst is joined by Taylor Green on keyboard and Andrew Gibbens on drums.

“The Oxford American is a nonprofit organization with a mission to explore the complexity and vitality of the American South through excellent writing, visual art, and events programming. Our quarterly print magazine was founded in 1992, and, in addition to winning four National Magazine Awards, has helped launch the writing careers of such noted authors as Jesmyn Ward and John Jeremiah Sullivan, while publishing beloved writers like Charles Portis, Nikky Finney, Peter Guralnick, and many others.

“Our concert series at South on Main in Little Rock is an extension of the magazine, creating meaningful opportunities for the community to experience the most culturally significant artists in our region.

“The OA has a longstanding history of curating great music. Our Winter 2018 issue is dedicated to the music of North Carolina. It is our twentieth installment of the series, which the Houston Chronicle calls "the single best music-related magazine of any given year." Each music issue comes with a sought-after CD, curated by the editors to showcase the region's hugely
varied musical legacy.”

More information about Oxford American programming, the magazine, and their mission can be found at
https://www.oxfordamerican.org

“A professed Southern Gothic songster born in Chattanooga but based in Johnson City, Tennessee, Amythyst Kiah’s commanding stage presence is only matched by her raw and powerful vocals—a deeply moving, hypnotic sound that stirs echoes of a distant and restless past.  Accoutered interchangeably with banjo, acoustic guitar, or a full band (Her Chest of Glass,) Amythyst’s toolbox is augmented by her scholarship of African-American roots music.  Provocative and coolly fierce, her ability to cross the boundaries of blues and old-time through reinterpretation is groundbreaking and simply unforgettable.  Amythyst Kiah is forging an important path from her musical ancestry to a multi-cultural generation with contemporary sensibilities and undeniable flair.”

Learn more about Amythyst Kiah at…
 https://amythystkiah.com/about

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1977 archival recording of Ozark original Aunt Ollie Gilbert performing the ballad “Springtime in Alaska,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

OHR119: OHR Presents: Jimbo Mathus & Kinfolks, 3/30/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Grammy award winning Mississippi singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, and Squirrel Nut Zippers co-founder Jimbo Mathus with his “Kinfolks” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with Jimbo. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of banjo Jedi Jimmy Connor performing the tune “Old Ed Setser.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious story of Katy Heidi, a woman of Austrian nobility who became a lifelong transplant to the early Missouri Ozarks.

Jimbo_mathis_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Grammy award winning Mississippi singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, and Squirrel Nut Zippers co-founder Jimbo Mathus with his “Kinfolks” recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this musical Mississippi maverick.

Jimbo Mathus is a singer-songwriter and guitarist, best known for his work with the swing revival band Squirrel Nut Zippers.  Born in Oxford, Mississippi to Jimmy Mathus and Jeanella (Malvezzi) Mathus, his early life was filled with music as his father and relatives were skilled instrumentalists and singers.  He began joining the family musical circle at an early age and by age eight was proficient at mandolin.  By age fifteen, Jimbo had been taught the rudiments of guitar, piano and harmony singing. The family's repertoire consisted of hundreds of folk, bluegrass, country blues and pre-recorded songs passed down through the Mathus and Byrd families. 

“Jimbo Mathus & Kinfolks” is a project that takes Jimbo back to his earliest musical roots.  Alongside lifelong friend and mentor Jimmy “Buck” Bennett on dobro, Steve Butler on fiddle, Ernie Welch guitar, and Steve Craig on bass, “Kinfolks” recreates the family and social music gatherings of Jimbo’s youth.

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of banjo Jedi Jimmy Connor performing the tune “Old Ed Setser,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins profiles the curious story of Katy Heidi, a woman of Austrian nobility who became a lifelong transplant to the early Missouri Ozarks.

OHR113: OHR Presents: JT Trawick, 4/13/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Portland, Oregon based singer-songwriter, square dance enthusiast, and Ozark original JT Trawick of the famed folk music family The Trawicks, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with JT. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of legendary Ozark balladeer Almeda Riddle, performing the traditional tune “From Jerusalem to Jericho.” Author, folklorist, and songwriter Charley Sandage asks the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

Jt_trawick_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s historic 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Portland, Oregon based singer-songwriter, square dance enthusiast, and Ozark original JT Trawick of the famed folk music family the Trawicks, recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas.  Also, interviews with JT.  JT is joined in this performance by champion fiddler Alex Sharps and bassist & multi-instrumentalist Bill Nesbitt.

Being of the legendary Trawick folk music family of the Ozarks, JT Trawick grew up immersed in traditional music.  Specializing in guitar, vocals and mandolin, JT has performed and worked with some of the premier musicians of our generation.  Two-time Grand North American Fiddle Champion - Calvin Vollrath, seven-time World Champion Fiddler - Jim "Texas Shorty" Chancellor, National Flatpick Champion - Tyler Grant, world famous mandolinist - Evan Marshall, Grand National Champion - Dale Morris Jr., three-time Grand Master Fiddle Champion - Matthew Hartz, Canadian Fiddle Queen - April Verch, and World Champion Fiddler - Ricky Boen are just a few of the artists Jonathan has worked with.

While calling Portland, Oregon his home base, JT Trawick remains involved with Fiddlin Arkansas, the Arkansas fiddle community outreach he started in 2010.  Today, the organization remains a lighthouse for all things Arkansas fiddle.  Continuing in the footsteps of his musical heroes, JT delivers authentic American roots music, traditional and original western swing, bluegrass and classic country to the people everywhere he goes. - https://www.jttrawick.com 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator and country music legacy Mark Jones offers a 1981 archival recording of legendary Ozark balladeer Almeda Riddle, performing the traditional tune “From Jerusalem to Jericho,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.  In this rare recording, Almeda, who normally performs a cappella, is accompanied by guitarist Jim Lansford.

Author, folklorist and songwriter Charley Sandage presents an historical portrait of the people, events and indomitable spirit of Ozark culture that resulted in the creation of the Ozark Folk Center State Park and its enduring legacy of music and craft.  In this episode, Charley speaks with members of a nomadic recreational vehicle community on the question “What’s Worth Keeping” from our past in the rapidly evolving culture of our present.

OHR121: OHR Presents: The Jake Leg Stompers, 4/27/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

Bucksnort, Tennessee based old school Memphis style jug band the Jake Leg Stompers recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with this band of musical outlaws. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of hammered dulcimer master Jay Round performing the traditional tune “Saint Anne’s Reel.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins explores the history of the Ozark Opry, one of the first old time barn dance music stage shows based in Springfield, Missouri.

Jake_leg_stompers_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, Bucksnort, Tennessee based old school Memphis style jug band the Jake Leg Stompers recorded live at Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with this band of musical outlaws.

A Jake Leg Stompers show is a truly unique experience.  Like a Vaudeville party with all the bells and whistles.  Literally, their show includes bells and whistles.  With lively renditions of classic blues and jug band tunes from early 20th century American music and a theatrical sensibility, the Jake Leg Stompers will have you dancing in your seat.  The band’s performers include leader Hambone Willie Nevil on vocals, banjo, and guitar, Lela Mae Smith on vocals, Horatio Algernon Whiplash on washboard, snare, bells, and whistles, Jersey Slim Hawkins with fiddle, mandolin, and guitar, and Ramshackle Jack Dunshee on old time jug.

For more information about the Jake Leg Stompers…
http://www.jakelegstompers.com/about 

In this week’s “From the Vault” segment, musician, educator, and country music legacy Mark Jones offers an archival recording of hammered dulcimer master Jay Round performing the traditional tune “Saint Anne’s Reel,” from the Ozark Folk Center State Park archives.

From his series entitled “Back in the Hills,” writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins explores the history of the Ozark Opry, one of the first old time barn dance music stage shows based in Springfield, Missouri.

OHR122: OHR Presents: Meredith Axelrod & Craig Ventresco, 5/11/2020

From Ozark Highlands Radio | Part of the Ozark Highlands Radio series | 58:59

San Francisco based early 20th Century American music preservationist duo Meredith Axelrod & Craig Ventresco recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park in Mountain View, Arkansas. Also, interviews with these time traveling minstrels. Mark Jones offers an archival recording of Ozark original Ulys Pilcher performing the traditional tune “Sally Goodin.” Writer, professor, and historian Dr. Brooks Blevins explores the story of the Ozark Jubilee, one of America’s first nationally-broadcast old time barn dance country music television shows based in Springfield, Missouri.

Meredith_axelrod___craig_ventresco_prx_small Ozark Highlands Radio is a weekly radio program that features live music and interviews recorded at Ozark Folk Center State Park’s beautiful 1,000-seat auditorium in Mountain View, Arkansas.  In addition to the music, our “Feature Host” segments take listeners through the Ozark hills with historians, authors, and personalities who explore the people, stories, and history of the Ozark region.

This week, San Francisco based early 20th Century American music preservationist duo Meredith Axelrod & Craig Ventresco recorded live at the Ozark Folk Center State Park.  Also, interviews with these time traveling minstrels.

“Delightfully engaging and unassumingly comic, Meredith Axelrod envisions the limitless potential of early twentieth century music, whether it be Ragtime, Music Hall, Pop Standard, Boogie Woogie, Tin Pan Alley, String band, Jazz, Country, Blues or even Jug Band music, and embodies the spirit that brought the music into existence.  Her vocal style is unusual, probably because she learned to sing by listening to how folks did it a century ago – through the medium of cylinders and 78-rpm records.

The dominant theme throughout Meredith’s expansive repertoire is that, whatever the genre, these are songs she learns from the ori