%s1 / %s2

Playlist: Diana Prince's Portfolio

Caption: PRX default Portfolio image
No text

Featured

Big Picture Science (Series)

Produced by Big Picture Science

Most recent piece in this series:

Creative Brains

From Big Picture Science | Part of the Big Picture Science series | 54:00

Creativebrainmed_small

Your cat is smart, but its ability to choreograph a ballet or write computer code isn’t great. A lot of animals are industrious and clever, but humans are the only animal that is uniquely ingenious and creative. 

Neuroscientist David Eagleman and composer Anthony Brandt discuss how human creativity has reshaped the world. Find out what is going on in your brain when you write a novel, paint a watercolor, or build a whatchamacallit in your garage.

But is Homo sapiens’ claim on creativity destined to be short-lived? Why both Eagleman and Brandt are prepared to step aside when artificial intelligence can do their jobs.

A Way with Words (Series)

Produced by A Way with Words

Most recent piece in this series:

Queen Bee (#1550)

From A Way with Words | Part of the A Way with Words series | 54:00

16545241268_1dacf2cde9_w_small The Orange County Museum of Art commissioned Los Angeles artist Alan Nakagawa to do a project he called "Social Distancing, Haiku, and You," in which he invited the public to write haikus about the experience of living through the Covid-19 pandemic.


Melissa in Grand Prairie, Texas, hails from a family in New Jersey that refers to red pasta sauce with meat in it as gravy. Her family has Italian roots, and in their local dialect, the word for "sauce" can also be translated as "gravy." Sicilian-Americans do this as well. In his book The New York Times Food Encyclopedia, Craig Claiborne says that sauce and gravy mean the same thing. The Sopranos Family Cookbook uses the word gravy in the same way, a usage also immortalized in a famous scene from the hit TV show.


Emily in San Diego, California, wonders about the phrase to dog, meaning "to close and secure" as in to dog a door. In a nautical context, the phrase dog the hatches means to secure them with a bolt or handle designed for that purpose. This phrase probably derives from the idea of securing the hatch as tightly as a tenacious dog locking something in its jaws. To undog a door or hatch is to open it.


Quiz Guy John Chaneski is puzzling over homographs, words that are spelled the same but have different meanings and sometimes different pronunciations. For example, what two words that are spelled the same are suggested by the following clue? An artist is commissioned to paint a picture of the planets, but the patron wants him to get rid of the imaginary lines about which the planet rotates. At that point, the patron would have to wait while the artist does what?  


Angela in Dallas, Texas, remembers her mom's admonition to wash your granny beads, meaning clean the dirt off your neck. Country music star Randy Houser sings about his own granny-beaded neck in his song "Boots On."


The art project called "Social Distancing, Haiku, and You," includes a poem that articulates gratitude to health-care workers on the front lines of the global pandemic.


Sean, who is originally from Ireland, wonders if the term narrowback is considered a slur against the Irish. He also references an earlier conversation of ours about the term skinnymalink and shares a rhyme he remembers from childhood that includes that word. There are many other versions of that rhyme, including one in the book The Lore and Language of Schoolchildren by Iona and Peter Opie.


Our discussion about the phrase Go sit on a tack! prompted a listener to send us a math-minded version, Go divide 22 by 7!.


A North Carolina listener wonders about her mother's comment in response to complaining or pestering: Go dry up and bust! Since the mid-1800s, the slang phrase Dry up! has meant  Stop talking! In the theater world, the term dry up can mean to forget one's lines.


The terms Cuddle death, piping, tooting, quacking, drone comet, and waggle dance are all part of the parlance of beekeepers. The book Queenspotting by Hilary Kearney details these and other bee-related terms. Kearney's website, Girl Next Door Honey, has much more about all things apiary. 


The threat I'm going to cloud up and rain all over you goes back to at least 1911.


Julia in Norfolk, Virginia, wants a verb that denotes the act of making something simple unnecessarily complicated, particularly in a work setting. Some possibilities: complexify, befoul, bemuddle, and embrangle.


A haiku from artist Alan Nakagawa's collection of poems about social distance celebrates the kind of companionship that plants provide.


Dallas, who lives in Eugene, Oregon, wonders why we use number one and number two as euphemisms for "pee" and "poo."


Artist Alan Nakagawa's project involving haikus about social distancing includes a funny take on just how blurred boundaries can become while under lockdown.


This episode is hosted by Grant Barrett and Martha Barnette.

WNYC's Fishko Files (Series)

Produced by WNYC

Most recent piece in this series:

WNYC's Fishko Files: Sviatoslav Richter

From WNYC | Part of the WNYC's Fishko Files series | 07:12

Saraflat_medium_small Sviatoslav Richter, born March 20 1915, was a pianistic phenomenon, whose broad musical range was backed up by dazzling technique. On the 100th anniversary of his birth, WNYC's Sara Fishko considers his musical gifts as well as his unconventional life.  With guests Michael Kimmelman (NY Times critic, pianist and sometime music writer), pianist Vladimir Viardo, and the late pianist and music critic Harris Goldsmith.

*The excerpts from Mussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition"  are from Richter's live recording made in Sofia, Bulgaria, on February 25, 1958 

Latin Perspective - Latin Jazz Hour (weekly) (Series)

Produced by Tony Vasquez

Most recent piece in this series:

Latin Jazz Perspective (Y-8)

From Tony Vasquez | Part of the Latin Perspective - Latin Jazz Hour (weekly) series | 59:01

Yvettei_small A weekly radio show featuring the best in classic and contemporary Latin Jazz music, hosted by 16year veteran Tony Vasquez.