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Playlist: Black History Month

Compiled By: Emma Geddes

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Songs for the Struggle-Jazz and the Civil Rights Movement (episode 1)

From Daniel Polletta | 58:25

Longtime WCPN Cleveland/ideastream jazz programmer Dan Polletta has created "Songs for the Struggle- Jazz and the Civil Rights Movement." This is a two-part musical survey of the work jazz musicians have created that called attention to the struggle for civil rights from the 1920s to the present.

These segmented 58:30 shows are a perfect fit as Black History Month specials. While the programs can stand alone, they are better presented as a package to provide a more comprehensive listening experience. They could be run back to back or over consecutive days or weeks.

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"Songs for the Struggle-Jazz and the Civil Rights Movement" takes a deep dive into the stories behind music jazz musicians have recorded that have called attention to the fight for Civil Rights.  

Hour one opens with Louis Armstrong's recording of "Black and Blue," including the story of how a gangster caused the song to be written. We examine the special orders that the owner of Cafe Society made each evening before  Billie Holiday sang "Strange Fruit" to accord the singer and the song the respect it was due. Charles Mingus satirizes racist Governor Orville Faubus with his "Original Faubus Fables" and we hear  trumpeter Freddie Hubbard's "The Core" which was his salute to the Congress of Racial Equality, recorded in 1964.   

The segmented show is 58:30 The program has a billboard. 

There is a 5 minute opitional music bed to fill news hole

There are three segments with floating breaks for first and second segments. Each of those segments has a separate music bed for optional use

The shows can stand alone. but would be better presented as a package to provide a more comprehensive listening experience.  They could run back to back, or on consecutive days or weeks.  They would be ideal as Black History Month specials

the show has a promo with space for a tag.  The promo for show 2 could be added at the end of show 1 as a tease for the second episode.

Songs for the Struggle-Jazz and the Civil Rights Movement (episode 2)

From Daniel Polletta | 58:25

Longtime WCPN Cleveland/ideastream jazz programmer Dan Polletta has created "Songs for the Struggle- Jazz and the Civil Rights Movement." This is a two-part musical survey of the work jazz musicians have created that called attention to the struggle for civil rights from the 1920s to the present.

These segmented 58:30 shows are a perfect fit as Black History Month specials. While the shows can stand alone, they are better presented as a package to provide a more comprehensive listening experience. They could be run back to back or over consecutive days or weeks.

Songs_for_the_struggle_small

"Songs for the Struggle-Jazz and the Civil Rights Movement" takes a deep dive into the stories behind music jazz musicians have recorded that have called attention to the fight for Civil Rights.  

Episode two picks up John Coltrane's epic recording "Alabama and examines the story of what prompted the saxophonist to record it. We also look at how the movement began to expand its' scope to include opposition to the Vietnam War with Nina Simone's "Backlash Blues" as well 1968's "Poor People's March," by tenor saxophonist Harold Land, which acknowledged Dr. King's final initiative...plus more contemporary recordings from singers Cassandra Wilson and Jazzmeia Horn

   The segmented show is 58:30 The program has a billboard. 


There is a 5 minute opitional music bed to fill news hole

There are three segments with floating breaks for first and second segments. Each of those segments has a separate music bed for optional use

The shows could run back to back, or on consecutive days or weeks.  They would be ideal as Black History Month specials

The show has a promo with space for a tag.  

Hour One: "In the Beginning" and "Pride & Enlightenment"

From PRX | Part of the "Black Radio: Telling It Like It Was" 25th Anniversary Edition (Six-Hour Series) series | 51:59

The series opens by traveling to the 1920s to hear how Black Americans fought for space on radio airwaves. Then, we hear about programs in the 1940s that dramatized issues and concerns in the Black community.

Blackradio_25thann_logo-03_small The series opens by traveling to the 1920s to hear how Black Americans fought for space on radio airwaves. Then, we hear about programs in the 1940s that dramatized issues and concerns in the Black community.

Hour One: "In the Beginning" and "Pride & Enlightenment"

From PRX | Part of the "Black Radio: Telling It Like It Was" 25th Anniversary Edition (Six-Hour Series) series | 51:59

The series opens by traveling to the 1920s to hear how Black Americans fought for space on radio airwaves. Then, we hear about programs in the 1940s that dramatized issues and concerns in the Black community.

Blackradio_25thann_logo-03_small The series opens by traveling to the 1920s to hear how Black Americans fought for space on radio airwaves. Then, we hear about programs in the 1940s that dramatized issues and concerns in the Black community.

The Long History of Black Resistance and Mass Incarceration

From WFHB | Part of the Kite Line series | 29:03

In this interview, Elizabeth Hinton sketches the relationship between the civil rights movement, urban uprisings and the beginning of the “War on Crime,” with a focus on the Harlem Riot of 1964, and the1 965 Watts Rebellion, which was triggered by police brutality and became a key law-and-order talking point. She then moves through a range of problems within the Black Power movement, focusing on overlooked experiences in the Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement in Detroit and Huey Newton’s later reflections on the Black Panthers. She also focuses attention on the FBI Counter Intelligence Program or COINTELPRO, and its role in breaking down Black Power organizations by spreading fear and conflicts inside and between them, as for example in the conflict between the Panthers and United Slaves Organization, or US.

In this interview, Hinton starts off by telling us about the Harlem Riot of 1964, which was a key starting point for other waves of disruption throughout the 1960s, including the Watts Rebellion.

She continues to research the linkages between state counterinsurgency programs and the maintenance of mass incarceration. Hinton released her celebrated history, “From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime,” two years ago. You can hear her in-depth talk about this book in Kite Line episodes 63 and 64.

Kitelinelogo_square_small In this interview, Elizabeth Hinton sketches the relationship between the civil rights movement, urban uprisings and the beginning of the “War on Crime,” with a focus on the Harlem Riot of 1964, and the1 965 Watts Rebellion, which was triggered by police brutality and became a key law-and-order talking point. She then moves through a range of problems within the Black Power movement, focusing on overlooked experiences in the Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement in Detroit and Huey Newton’s later reflections on the Black Panthers. She also focuses attention on the FBI Counter Intelligence Program or COINTELPRO, and its role in breaking down Black Power organizations by spreading fear and conflicts inside and between them, as for example in the conflict between the Panthers and United Slaves Organization, or US. In this interview, Hinton starts off by telling us about the Harlem Riot of 1964, which was a key starting point for other waves of disruption throughout the 1960s, including the Watts Rebellion. She continues to research the linkages between state counterinsurgency programs and the maintenance of mass incarceration. Hinton released her celebrated history, “From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime,” two years ago. You can hear her in-depth talk about this book in Kite Line episodes 63 and 64.

Black History

From Phil Mariage | Part of the Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow series | 29:00

Three generations discuss their perspectives on Black History

Ytt-300x300_small Oneof the early assistants and a life long activist in Race Relations, Annie Abrams from Little Rock brings her older generation perspective on Black History to this generational discussion. Genealogist Rhonda Stewart has the middle generation perspective along with Crystal Mercer in the younger generation. Crystal Mercer is an Interpretive Guide at the Central High School National Historic Site. Two generations past the Central High crisis finds us in a different world as far as empathy and understanding are concerned. This is a wonderful discussion about Black History in a way you seldom hear - generation on generation.

James McGrath Morris, ETHEL PAYNE: THE FIRST LADY OF THE BLACK PRESS

From Francesca Rheannon | 59:01

We talk with acclaimed biographer James McGrath Morris about his just-released biography, Ethel Payne, First Lady Of The Black Press. Few Americans today have ever heard of Ethel Payne, much less understood the giant role she played in reporting the story -- and advancing the agenda -- of the civil rights movement in America. Through Payne's riveting personal story, Morris takes the reader on an inspiring journey through the civil rights movement -- and a greater understanding of issues that continue to resonate strongly today.

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The great civil rights struggles of the mid-twentieth century, with their emphasis on non-violent political action, depended crucially on press coverage to gain impact -- and, ultimately, success. But their stories may have gone untold were it not for newspapers like the Chicago Defender and other organs of the black press. They broke the stories that the white mainstream media picked up and disseminated to a wider audience. Yet few in that wider audience even knew of the existence of the black press.

Perhaps no reporter was more important Ethel Payne. Dubbed “the First Lady of the black press,” she told the world about a young leader emerging out of the civil rights movement in Atlanta named Martin Luther King, Jr. She told the story of Emmet Till’s mother, who had to view the badly mutilated body of her 14 year old son after the brutal beating that took his life. She hammered a nail into the coffin of McCarthyism when she reported on the persecution of a lowly African-American Pentagon employee absurdly accused on being a Communist spy.

The first African American woman to be part of the Washington Press Corps, she courageously buttonholed presidents with searching questions about racial prejudice and civil rights. Unlike many of her colleagues then and now, she was no mere stenographer but held the powerful to account for their policies and views.

Yet few Americans have ever heard of Ethel Payne, much less understood the giant role she played in reporting the story -- and advancing the agenda -- of civil rights in America. Now, a terrific biography of Payne has just come out from Harper Collins, written by my guest this hour, James McGrath Morris.  Through Payne’s riveting personal story, he takes the reader on an inspiring journey through the civil rights movement -- and a greater understanding of issues that continue to resonate strongly today. The book is “Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, the First Lady of the Black Press.”

In addition to Eye on the Struggle, James McGrath Morris is the author of the acclaimed biography Pulitzer: A Life in Politics, Print, and Power and two other books.