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Playlist: 29-30 min Specials

Compiled By: Emma Geddes

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Community Wealth Building: From Cleveland to Preston

From Laura Flanders | Part of the The Laura Flanders Show series | 28:00

How does an economy emerge from recession? In Preston, England, they’re experimenting with investing public money in locally-owned businesses and cooperatives, and encouraging local “anchor” institutions to buy from, or train, local vendors. They’re calling it the Preston model of community wealth building, and it’s inspired by a model in another formerly industrialized city: Cleveland, Ohio, home of the Evergreen Cooperatives. This week on The Laura Flanders Show, we take a look at a transatlantic experiment in cooperative community wealth building.

Screen_shot_2019-03-29_at_4 How does an economy emerge from recession? Historically, cities hard hit by deindustrialization have strived to attract big employers from elsewhere by offering incentives and tax breaks. But outside employers rarely invest in a place long term, and all too often skip town when the incentives run out. In some places, local governments have been experimenting with other strategies. In Preston, England, they’re experimenting with investing public money in locally-owned businesses and cooperatives, and encouraging local “anchor” institutions to buy from, or train, local vendors. They’re calling it the Preston model of community wealth building, and it’s inspired by a model in another formerly industrialized city: Cleveland, Ohio, home of the Evergreen Cooperatives.  This week on The Laura Flanders Show, we take a look at a transatlantic experiment in cooperative community wealth building.

A Public Health Approach to Policing: The Newark Model

From Laura Flanders | Part of the The Laura Flanders Show series | 28:00

What does it look like to adopt a public health approach to safety, policing, and economic development? In February, 2020, Laura visited Newark, New Jersey, to look at one city where decades of police reform efforts failed to stop violence and crime. Now, at the invitation of Mayor Raz Baraka, Aqeela Sherrills, a former gang-truce broker in Los Angeles, heads up the Newark Community Street Team which leverages residents relationships to prevent violence before it starts. This episode offers a timely glimpse of what it looks like when more responsibility for public safety is put in public hands and opens up the conversation about defunding the police.

Screen_shot_2019-03-29_at_4 In the face of on-going police brutality against African Americans and the disproportionate impact of the Covid-19 epidemic on people of color, the United States has reached a tipping point in relation to racism, policing and public health. But what does it look like to adopt a public health approach to safety, policing, and economic development? In February, 2020, Laura visited Newark, New Jersey, to look at one city where decades of police reform efforts failed to stop violence and crime. Now, at the invitation of Mayor Raz Baraka, Aqeela Sherrills, a former gang-truce broker in Los Angeles, heads up the Newark Community Street Team which leverages residents relationships to prevent violence before it starts. Flanders talks with Sherrills and other former gang members turned peace-keepers about how they address abuse and transform trauma for themselves and others, and to the citys Public Safety Director about what its taken to build the teams partnership with police. This episode offers a timely glimpse of what it looks like when more responsibility for public safety is put in public hands and opens up the conversation about defunding the police. 

Life Stages: Death

From New Hampshire Public Radio | Part of the Civics 101 series | 29:07

Or How I Stopped Grieving and Learned to Love Bureaucracy

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It's also the final episode of our Life Stages series, and its euphemism-free. We speak to a doctors, lawyers, professors, and funeral professionals about the rules of death; pronouncing, declaring, burying, cremating, willing, trusting, canceling, donating.

Featuring the voices of Dan Cassino, Ken Iserson, Leah Plunkett, Mandy Stafford, and Taelor Johnson. 

The Untold Story of an Artist Surviving During COVID with Heidi Jeub

From KVSC | Part of the Untold Stories of Central Minnesota series | 29:54

In today’s Untold Story of Central Minnesota, Arts & Cultural Heritage Producer Jeff Carmack takes a look at the life of an artist during the time of COVID-19.

Heidi Jeub is an artist and teacher who relied upon a variety of freelance work to make a living and whose entire world was flipped upside down due to the pandemic. We start with an interview from the beginning of April when we were all just beginning to realize the gravity of the situation and then end out in Holdingford on the Wobegon Trial at a new artistic, community endeavor which is just about to open to the public called Art in Motion where Heidi has found a role as artistic consultant.

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In today’s Untold Story of Central Minnesota, Arts & Cultural Heritage Producer Jeff Carmack takes a look at the life of an artist during the time of COVID-19. 

Heidi Jeub is an artist and teacher who relied upon a variety of freelance work to make a living and whose entire world was flipped upside down due to the pandemic.  We start with an interview from the beginning of April when we were all just beginning to realize the gravity of the situation and then end out in Holdingford on the Wobegon Trial at a new artistic, community endeavor which is just about to open to the public called Art in Motion where Heidi has found a role as artistic consultant. 

The Untold Story of the Public Sharing Their Stories on Juneteenth at St. Cloud's Promise Neighborhood

From KVSC | Part of the Untold Stories of Central Minnesota series | 30:00

In a this Juneteenth edition of the Untold Stories of Central Minnesota, Arts & Cultural Heritage Producer Jeff Carmack attended the June 19th observance of Juneteenth at Promise Neighborhood in St. Cloud.

With the original celebration canceled due to COVID concerns, Promise Neighborhood decided to hold a socially distanced public forum following the recent unrest due to protests over the killing of George Floyd spilling over into the St. Cloud area. Community members were asked to try to come up with answers to two questions, what does St. Cloud need for unity and what is a thing we can DO in St. Cloud to make that happen.

This program is funded in part by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Legacy Grant!

Promise_juneteenth_2020-1-scaled_small In a this Juneteenth edition of the Untold Stories of Central Minnesota, Arts & Cultural Heritage Producer Jeff Carmack attended the June 19th observance of Juneteenth at Promise Neighborhood in St. Cloud. 

With the original celebration canceled due to COVID concerns, Promise Neighborhood decided to hold a socially distanced public forum following the recent unrest due to protests over the killing of George Floyd spilling over into the St. Cloud area.  Community members were asked to try to come up with answers to two questions, what does St. Cloud need for unity and what is a thing we can DO in St. Cloud to make that happen. 

This program is funded in part by the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Legacy Grant!

The Witches' Hammer

From Hold That Thought | 29:33

How magic and law shaped the witch trials of early modern Europe

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In 1487, when witch trials were just starting to take root in Europe, a Dominican priest published the Malleus Maleficarum , or The Witches' Hammer , a treatise on the prosecution of witches in a court of law. This text would be used over the next three centuries as the authority on the trial and torture of witches, laying out why women in particular were so susceptible to witchcraft. By the end of the witch craze in the 1720s, an estimated 80,000 had been tried and executed. In this extended episode from Hold That Thought , Gerhild Williams, a professor of comparative literature, breaks down the witch trial phenomenon into three parts: (1) defining the witch and the roots of these beliefs, (2) how the political landscape evolved and the contents of The Witches' Hammer , and (3) how and why the witch craze took hold and what we can learn from it today.

Mutual Aid Justice: Beyond Survival

From Laura Flanders | Part of the The Laura Flanders Show series | 28:00

What does it look like in the Justice sphere? If you don’t want to call the cops, what else can you do? Many people turn to transformative justice for help. In the nation that incarcerates more people than any other on earth, there are many reasons why a person might not want to call 911. Undocumented, sick, over-policed, dependent on or in love with an abuser? In this episode, Laura talks with the editors of the just-released book, Beyond Survival: Strategies and Stories from the Transformative Justice Movement. Transformative justice applies the principles of mutual aid to justice. It seeks to resolve violence for the long term at the peer-to-peer, grassroots level by looking for resolution, not punishment, and relying on community, not the system.

Screen_shot_2019-03-29_at_4 What does it look like in the Justice sphere? If you don’t want to call the cops, what else can you do? Many people turn to transformative justice for help. In the nation that incarcerates more people than any other on earth, there are many reasons why a person might not want to call 911. Undocumented, sick, over-policed, dependent on or in love with an abuser? In this episode, Laura talks with the editors of the just-released book, Beyond Survival: Strategies and Stories from the Transformative Justice Movement. Transformative justice applies the principles of mutual aid to justice. It seeks to resolve violence for the long term at the peer-to-peer, grassroots level by looking for resolution, not punishment, and relying on community, not the system. Music in the Middle: New Yorkers at home applauding essential workers from their windows.  It’s a daily ritual at 7pm to show appreciation while staying at a distance. And that appreciation is growing louder by the day! 

Washington Post Fact Checker Glenn Kessler on Accountability Journalism

From Gina Baleria | Part of the News In Context series | 29:30

In this episode, we talk with Glenn Kessler, editor… and chief writer of the Washington Post Fact Checker… and credited with doing the first official fact check during the 1996 Presidential campaign… ahead of a debate between Bill Clinton and Bob Dole.

Kessler is also co-author of the book… Donald Trump and His Assault on Truth: The President’s Falsehoods, Misleading Claims and Flat-Out Lies… which chronicles and examines the falsehoods Trump has uttered throughout his presidency.

Kessler’s approach to fact checking had to change during the years Trump was president… prompting him and his team to create a separate database to catalogue and deal with the average of 15 false claims a day… while still endeavoring to explore and contextualize fact checks from other politicians based on policy.

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In this episode, we talk with Glenn Kessler, editor… and chief writer of the Washington Post Fact Checker… and credited with doing the first official fact check during the 1996 Presidential campaign… ahead of a debate between Bill Clinton and Bob Dole.

 

Kessler is also co-author of the book… Donald Trump and His Assault on Truth: The President’s Falsehoods, Misleading Claims and Flat-Out Lieswhich chronicles and examines the falsehoods Trump has uttered throughout his presidency.

 

Kessler’s approach to fact checking had to change during the years Trump was president… prompting him and his team to create a separate database to catalogue and deal with the average of 15 false claims a day… while still endeavoring to explore and contextualize fact checks from other politicians based on policy.

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Sylvia Brownrigg – "Absent Tangible Memory"

From Barry Vogel | Part of the Radio Curious series | 29:00

Metaphysical Touch

When someone dies, we have that person’s papers and things to look at and use to understand and create memories about the life that has left us. Sometimes, however, the person stays and the papers and tokens are lost, as in a fire. Then we have only memories without material objects to help enhance them. This juxtaposition is one of the themes in a novel entitled the “Metaphysical Touch,” by Syvia Brownrigg, an American author with roots in Mendocino County, a long experience in London, and currently living near San Francisco.

Sylvia Brownrigg recommends “Out of Sheer Rage,” by Jeff Dyer.

Originally Broadcast: January 12, 2000

Radio-curious-logosmall_small Metaphysical Touch When someone dies, we have that person’s papers and things to look at and use to understand and create memories about the life that has left us. Sometimes, however, the person stays and the papers and tokens are lost, as in a fire. Then we have only memories without material objects to help enhance them. This juxtaposition is one of the themes in a novel entitled the “Metaphysical Touch,” by Syvia Brownrigg, an American author with roots in Mendocino County, a long experience in London, and currently living near San Francisco. Sylvia Brownrigg recommends “Out of Sheer Rage,” by Jeff Dyer. Originally Broadcast: January 12, 2000

Joe Brewer: Farms of the Future

From Alex Wise | Part of the Sea Change Radio series | 29:00

For environmentalists “agriculture” can be something of a dirty word, associated with other words such as, pesticides, water consumption, pollutants, and deforestation. Not all environmentalists have these negative associations, though. Some, like my guest today, are working to re-fashion agricultural practices so that they actually help to reverse environmental damage. This week on Sea Change Radio we are speaking with Joe Brewer, an American ex-pat living and working in the regenerative agriculture space in Colombia. We discuss his family’s journey to this small but vibrant farming community, the lessons he’s learned, and how those lessons can be scaled to bigger farms in the U.S.

Joe-brewer_copy_small For environmentalists “agriculture” can be something of a dirty word, associated with other words such as, pesticides, water consumption, pollutants, and deforestation. Not all environmentalists have these negative associations, though. Some, like my guest today, are working to re-fashion agricultural practices so that they actually help to reverse environmental damage. This week on Sea Change Radio we are speaking with Joe Brewer, an American ex-pat living and working in the regenerative agriculture space in Colombia. We discuss his family’s journey to this small but vibrant farming community, the lessons he’s learned, and how those lessons can be scaled to bigger farms in the U.S.

What Do You Need to Make Martian Oxygen? MOXIE!

From Mat Kaplan | Part of the Planetary Radio series | 28:50

Making oxygen from the Martian atmosphere will be essential if humans are ever to visit and work on the Red Planet, and the MOXIE experiment will soon show us how.

Honor, Hope and Healing Monday Special - Part One

From John Floridis | Part of the Montana Public Radio Special Programs - Related to Musician's Spotlight series | 29:01

An hour long celebration of musicians who left us in 2020 as part of our Honor, Hope and Healing Week. The musicians we'll be remembering include.... Bill Withers, Kenny Rogers, Justin Townes Earle, Betty Wright, Peter Green, Jerry Jeff Walker, Lyle Mays, Ellis Marsalis, Johnny Nash, Charlie Daniels, Neil Peart (Rush), Toots Hibbert, Spencer Davis, Helen Reddy, Barbara Martin (The Supremes), John Prine, Joseph Shabalala (Ladysmith Black Mumbazo), Little Richard, McCoy Tyner and Eddie Van Halen. Part one of two.

Honor-hope-healing-fb_small An hour long celebration of musicians who left us in 2020 as part of our Honor, Hope and Healing Week. The musicians we'll be remembering include.... Bill Withers, Kenny Rogers, Justin Townes Earle, Betty Wright, Peter Green, Jerry Jeff Walker, Lyle Mays, Ellis Marsalis, Johnny Nash, Charlie Daniels, Neil Peart (Rush), Toots Hibbert, Spencer Davis, Helen Reddy, Barbara Martin (The Supremes), John Prine, Joseph Shabalala (Ladysmith Black Mumbazo), Little Richard, McCoy Tyner and Eddie Van Halen. Part one of two.

Honor, Hope and Healing Monday Special - Part Two

From John Floridis | Part of the Montana Public Radio Special Programs - Related to Musician's Spotlight series | 29:30

An hour long celebration of musicians who left us in 2020 as part of our Honor, Hope and Healing Week. The musicians we'll be remembering include.... Bill Withers, Kenny Rogers, Justin Townes Earle, Betty Wright, Peter Green, Jerry Jeff Walker, Lyle Mays, Ellis Marsalis, Johnny Nash, Charlie Daniels, Neil Peart (Rush), Toots Hibbert, Spencer Davis, Helen Reddy, Barbara Martin (The Supremes), John Prine, Joseph Shabalala (Ladysmith Black Mumbazo), Little Richard, McCoy Tyner and Eddie Van Halen. Part two of two.

Honor-hope-healing-fb_small An hour long celebration of musicians who left us in 2020 as part of our Honor, Hope and Healing Week. The musicians we'll be remembering include.... Bill Withers, Kenny Rogers, Justin Townes Earle, Betty Wright, Peter Green, Jerry Jeff Walker, Lyle Mays, Ellis Marsalis, Johnny Nash, Charlie Daniels, Neil Peart (Rush), Toots Hibbert, Spencer Davis, Helen Reddy, Barbara Martin (The Supremes), John Prine, Joseph Shabalala (Ladysmith Black Mumbazo), Little Richard, McCoy Tyner and Eddie Van Halen. Part two of two.

Children & Toxins

From Guy Rathbun | Part of the IdeaSphere: A Platform for Today's Voices series | 29:00

Thousands of new chemicals have been developed and released into the global environment during the last four decades. Yet, most of those chemicals have undergone only minimal safety testing. Which means their potential for developmental toxicity is not known for years.

Dr Those who are most negatively affected by the lack of oversight are the children. The impact is felt for their lifetime.

Now, there is a comprehensive guide to the environmental threats. It’s authored by two of the foremost researchers in the field of pediatrics and environmental health, Mary M. Landrigan and Dr. Philip Landrigan.

Children & Environmental Toxins: What Everyone Needs to Know is the title.

Dr. Landrigan is a pediatrician, epidemiologist. He serves as Dean for Global Health in the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.   He is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, and now on the End Kids Cancer advisory board.

In the early 1970s, Landrigan’s attention was drawn to the exposure of lead and its affects on children. His landmark studies were among the first to show that lead can cause brain damage to children. This work was critical in persuading the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to remove lead from gasoline and paint. Their actions  resulted in a 95% decline in lead poisoning in children.

Landrigan joins the program along with Executive Director of End Kids Cancer, Frank Kalman, who’s daughter was diagnosed with neuroblastoma nearly 20-years ago. It sent him on a path to better understand childhood cancers, and therefore help other parents faced with tough choices.

I should also note that I am on the board of directors for End Kids Cancer.

Re-Localizing Food : Transforming US Agriculture, Part 2

From Wendy Ring | Part of the Cool Solutions series | 28:00

Food hubs are important building blocks in fixing our broken food system.

Free_farmacy_small Food hubs are not just for foodies. These homegrown market networks are essential lifelines for farmers moving beyond corn, soy, and CAFOs.

When long supply chains failed in March 2020, those lifelines became literal and immediate, keeping farmers afloat and communities fed. Founders of two Virginia food hubs tell their stories.  

Ramon Torres, President of Familias Unidas por la Justicia, Jason Holland, WPEA Organizer, and Edgar Franks, C2C Organizer

From KSVR Studios: Skagit Valley Radio | Part of the We Do the Work series | 28:01

Interview by Gary Kanter: Ramon, Jason, and Edgar tell the story of how a group of farm workers ended up negotiating a great union contract.

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Ramon Torres, President of Familias Unidas por la Justicia, Jason Holland, WPEA Organizer, and Edgar Franks, C2C Organizer

Interview by Gary Kanter: Ramon, Jason, and Edgar tell the story of how a group of farm workers ended up negotiating a great union contract.

For more information, go to http://familiasunidasjusticia.org/en/home/, https://www.facebook.com/FamiliasUnidas/, or http://www.foodjustice.org/team/.

We Do The Work Comment:
We need our voting rights guaranteed.

World in Progress 12/10/2020

From DW - Deutsche Welle | Part of the World in Progress: Global Development Issues ~ from DW series | 30:00

This week on the show: The dark side of St. Nicholas -

The Christian tradition of Saint Nicholas usually means it's time for small gifts and chocolate, especially for kids. But for others, the tradition has a dark side: The Netherlands' Zwarte Piet or Black Pete depicts a helper of Saint Nicholas dressed in blackface. And: Chocolate isn't so sweet for West African chocolate producers.

Wip1_small This week on the show: The dark side of St. Nicholas - The Christian tradition of Saint Nicholas usually means it's time for small gifts and chocolate, especially for kids. But for others, the tradition has a dark side: The Netherlands' Zwarte Piet or Black Pete depicts a helper of Saint Nicholas dressed in blackface. And: Chocolate isn't so sweet for West African chocolate producers.

Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm

From Making Contact | Part of the Making Contact series | 29:00

Three years after Hurricane Maria hit, Puerto Ricans are still reeling from its effects and aftereffects. We bring you a Haymarket Books talk by Marisol LeBrón, Yarimar Bonilla, and Molly Crabapple, on a collection of essays called “Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm” which discusses the legacy of Maria, and also community organizing in the face of government abandonment. This piece includes clips from the Short Film : "Aftershocks of Disaster," directed by Juan C. Dávila, and produced by Yarimar Bonilla.

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Three years after Hurricane Maria hit, Puerto Ricans are still reeling from its effects and aftereffects. We bring you a Haymarket Books talk by Marisol LeBrón, Yarimar Bonilla, and Molly Crabapple, on a collection of essays called “Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm” which discusses the legacy of Maria, and also community organizing in the face of government abandonment. This event includes the premier of the new short film: "Aftershocks of Disaster," directed by Juan C. Dávila, and produced by Yarimar Bonilla.

The concept of "aftershocks" is used in the context of earthquakes to describe the jolts felt after the initial quake, but no disaster is a singular event. Aftershocks of Disaster examines the lasting effects of hurricane Maria, not just the effects of the wind or the rain, but delving into the failure of the state and the incredible organizing done by everyday people in order to rebuild and support one another.

Amazon Awakenings

From BirdNote | Part of the Sound Escapes Season Two series | 29:30

Discover the tranquility of Zabalo Wilderness Quiet Park in Ecuador and learn why Gordon describes it as "a living Eden."

Zabalo_16-9_small Discover the tranquility of Zabalo Wilderness Quiet Park in Ecuador and learn why Gordon describes it as "a living Eden."