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Playlist: Political Civility and Polarization

Compiled By: Good Radio Shows, Inc.

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PEACE TALKS RADIO episodes from its archive exploring solutions to the rising incivility and polarization in American politics.

Returning Civility to Political Discourse

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 59:01

National polling in recent years has consistently reported that 2/3rds of those polled feel that there’s a major problem with civility in our nation, while 75% agree that it’s certainly worse than it was just a few years ago. Since 2004, PEACE TALKS RADIO has been tracking the conversation about the declining civility in our political discourse. This time on the program we present another panel of guests with their takes on it with Suzanne Kryder hosting the conversations.

Lightbulb_small National polling in recent years has consistently reported that 2/3rds of those polled feel that there’s a major problem with civility in our nation, while 75% agree that it’s certainly worse than it was just a few years ago.  Since 2004, PEACE TALKS RADIO has been tracking the conversation about the declining civility in our political discourse.  This time on the program we present another panel of guests with their takes on it with Suzanne Kryder hosting the conversations.  

We hear from Fordham University Communications/ Media Studies professor Jesse Baldwin-Philippi, who isn’t sure that we can blame the social media tech platform for our incivility.  Also, we hear from Tasha Philpot, who is an  Associate Professor of Government at the University of Texas at Austin.  Also, a politician,, Brent Hill who became a member of the Idaho State Senate in 2000 and its President Pro Tem in 2010.  He is also the Director of a program called Next Generation at the National Institute for Civil Discourse. 

Returning Civility to Political Discourse (29:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:00

National polling in recent years has consistently reported that 2/3rds of those polled feel that there’s a major problem with civility in our nation, while 75% agree that it’s certainly worse than it was just a few years ago. Since 2004, PEACE TALKS RADIO has been tracking the conversation about the declining civility in our political discourse. This time on the program we present another panel of guests with their takes on it with Suzanne Kryder hosting the conversations.

Civilityrespect_small National polling in recent years has consistently reported that 2/3rds of those polled feel that there’s a major problem with civility in our nation, while 75% agree that it’s certainly worse than it was just a few years ago.  Since 2004, PEACE TALKS RADIO has been tracking the conversation about the declining civility in our political discourse.  This time on the program we present another panel of guests with their takes on it with Suzanne Kryder hosting the conversations.  

We hear from Fordham University Communications/ Media Studies professor Jesse Baldwin-Philippi, who isn’t sure that we can blame the social media tech platform for our incivility.  Also, we hear from Tasha Philpot, who is an  Associate Professor of Government at the University of Texas at Austin.  Also, a politician,, Brent Hill who became a member of the Idaho State Senate in 2000 and its President Pro Tem in 2010.  He is also the Director of a program called Next Generation at the National Institute for Civil Discourse. 

John Lewis: Profile in Peace

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 59:00

The late 17-term Congressman and civil rights leader John Lewis is remembered in a special that includes the memorial ceremonies at the U.S. Capitol when his body laid in state in the Rotunda, a week after his death July 17, 2020. Also included are other tributes, and archival tapes of John Lewis speeches and interviews.

Rep-john-lewis_small The late 17-term Congressman and civil rights leader John Lewis is remembered in a special that includes the memorial ceremonies at the U.S. Capitol when his body laid in state in the Rotunda, a week after his death July 17, 2020.  Also included are other tributes, and archival tapes of John Lewis speeches and interviews.  Paul Ingles hosts.

John Lewis: Profile in Peace (29:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:00

The late 17-term Congressman and civil rights leader John Lewis is remembered in a special that includes the memorial ceremonies at the U.S. Capitol when his body laid in state in the Rotunda, a week after his death July 17, 2020.

Rep-john-lewis_small The late 17-term Congressman and civil rights leader John Lewis is remembered in a special that includes the memorial ceremonies at the U.S. Capitol when his body laid in state in the Rotunda, a week after his death July 17, 2020.  Hosted by Paul Ingles.

Is This What Peaceful Democracy Looks Like?

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 59:00

In recent years, national elections have been tightly contested and one result has been an uptick in the rancor in political discourse. With that, surveys show an increase in stress over politics, and anxiety over discussing politics with family and co-workers. Can we craft more peace of mind when politics don’t go our way? Can we talk with our political opposites? All open for more discussion, this time on Peace Talks Radio.

Election-stress-america_small In recent years, national elections have been tightly contested and one result has been an uptick in the rancor in political discourse. With that, surveys show an increase in stress over politics, and anxiety over discussing politics with family and co-workers.  Can we craft more peace of mind when politics don’t go our way?  Can we talk with our political opposites?  All open for more discussion, this time on Peace Talks Radio.

Host Suzanne Kryder talks with guests Nancy Molitor a therapist from the Chicago area, Minneapolis based therapist Irene Greene, and Bob Thomson a therapist in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Is This What Peaceful Democracy Looks Like?

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:00

In recent years, national elections have been tightly contested and one result has been an uptick in the rancor in political discourse. With that, surveys show an increase in stress over politics, and anxiety over discussing politics with famliy and co-workers. Can we craft more peace of mind when politics don’t go our way? Can we talk with our political opposites? All open for more discussion, this time on Peace Talks Radio.

Election-stress-america_small In recent years, national elections have been tightly contested and one result has been an uptick in the rancor in political discourse. With that, surveys show an increase in stress over politics, and anxiety over discussing politics with famliy and co-workers.  Can we craft more peace of mind when politics don’t go our way?  Can we talk with our political opposites?  All open for more discussion, this time on Peace Talks Radio.

Host Suzanne Kryder talks with guests
 Nancy Molitor a therapist from the Chicago area, Minneapolis based therapisst Irene Greene, and Bob Thomson a therapist in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Peace Around Political Polarization

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 59:00

On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, three guests who’ll touch on just a few of the many reasons political polarization continues in the U.S. Each have a few ideas and programs that could close the gap, even a little bit. Ideas that you could try that just might lessen political polarization at your dinner table, in your neighborhood, your state, and around the country.

Political_conversation_small This isn't a program about the current electoral races. Rather, it looks at a few of the possible causes of and solutions to political polarization.  Statistics show that polarization of liberals and conservatives is on the rise in the US. How come? This program doesn't have time to review all of the possible causes including money, media, and isolationism. But, we will explore some ideas such as biological disgust, voting issues, and collaborative conversations. We focus on solutions that individuals and groups can take to lessen political polarization at the dinner table, in your neighborhood, and around the country.

We'll meet Jessie Fields, a New York state advocate for open primaries, Ravi Iyer, from California, who helps
manage the civilpolitics.org website, and first Rob Karwath with the "Speak Your Peace" program in Duluth, Minnesota.

Peace Around Political Polarization

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:00

On this edition of Peace Talks Radio, three guests who’ll touch on just a few of the many reasons political polarization continues in the U.S. Each have a few ideas and programs that could close the gap, even a little bit. Ideas that you could try that just might lessen political polarization at your dinner table, in your neighborhood, your state, and around the country.

Political_conversation_small This isn't a program about the current electoral races. Rather, it looks at a few of the possible causes and solutions of political polarization.  Statistics show that polarization of liberals and conservatives is on the rise in the US. How come? This program doesn't have time to review all of the possible causes including money, media, and isolationism. But, we will explore some ideas such as biological disgust, voting issues, and collaborative conversations. We focus on solutions that individuals and groups can take to lessen political polarization at the dinner table, in your neighborhood, and around the country.

We'll meet Jessie Fields, a New York state advocate for open primaries, Ravi Iyer, from California, who helps
manage the civilpolitics.org website, and first Rob Karwath with the "Speak Your Peace" program in Duluth, Minnesota.

Resolving Conflict, “Town Meeting” Style

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 59:01

Long before the United States became a nation and implemented American democracy as we know it today, there were town meetings. Nearly 400 years later, the town meeting tradition has endured in New England, though with each passing decade, towns are seeing a steady decline in participation. On this episode of Peace Talks Radio, correspondent Sarah Holtz brings us a conversation about conflict resolution through the lens of town meeting. We'll hear from four individuals who actively participate in their own town meetings.

Slowdemocracycover_small

Long before the United States became a nation and implemented American democracy as we know it today, there were town meetings. By the 17th century, a constellation of small towns had spread across New England, each with its own assembly of citizens that would convene, deliberate, and make decisions together. Nearly 400 years later, the town meeting tradition has endured in New England, though with each passing decade, towns are seeing a steady decline in participation. On this episode of Peace Talks Radio, correspondent Sarah Holtz brings us a conversation about conflict resolution through the lens of town meeting. We'll hear from four individuals who actively participate in their own town meetings.  
Our guests include Peter Ashton, who served as his town’s selectman for nine years and just ended his tenure as the town moderator of Acton, Massachusetts, which is located northwest of Boston.  Also on the program is Jessamyn West. She’s a librarian and community technologist in the town of Randolph, which is located at the geographic center of Vermont.  She’s also Justice of the Peace there.  Also featured is Amy Kolb Noyes, a reporter for Vermont Public Radio, where she’s been covering town meetings for decades.  Our fourth and final guest, Susan Clark, has written extensively on local decision-making. Susan currently serves as the town moderator of Middlesex, Vermont, and in 2012, she co-wrote a book called Slow Democracy. 

Resolving Conflict, “Town Meeting” Style

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:00

Long before the United States became a nation and implemented American democracy as we know it today, there were town meetings. Nearly 400 years later, the town meeting tradition has endured in New England, though with each passing decade, towns are seeing a steady decline in participation. On this episode of Peace Talks Radio, correspondent Sarah Holtz brings us a conversation about conflict resolution through the lens of town meeting. We'll hear from four individuals who actively participate in their own town meetings.

Town_hall_small

Long before the United States became a nation and implemented American democracy as we know it today, there were town meetings. By the 17th century, a constellation of small towns had spread across New England, each with its own assembly of citizens that would convene, deliberate, and make decisions together. Nearly 400 years later, the town meeting tradition has endured in New England, though with each passing decade, towns are seeing a steady decline in participation. On this episode of Peace Talks Radio, correspondent Sarah Holtz brings us a conversation about conflict resolution through the lens of town meeting. We'll hear from four individuals who actively participate in their own town meetings.  

Our guests include Peter Ashton, who served as his town’s selectman for nine years and just ended his tenure as the town moderator of Acton, Massachusetts, which is located northwest of Boston.  Also on the program is Jessamyn West. She’s a librarian and community technologist in the town of Randolph, which is located at the geographic center of Vermont.  She’s also Justice of the Peace there.  Also featured is Amy Kolb Noyes, a reporter for Vermont Public Radio, where she’s been covering town meetings for decades.  Our fourth and final guest, Susan Clark, has written extensively on local decision-making. Susan currently serves as the town moderator of Middlesex, Vermont, and in 2012, she co-wrote a book called Slow Democracy. 

Seeking Civility in Political Discourse (59:00 / 54:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:55

On this election season edition of Peace Talks Radio, an assessment of the problem of incivility in political discourse - and some ideas on how to address it from a number people including a present member and a former member of Congress, two media analysts, and a woman who's taking her kitchen table out to invite people to sit at it and talk calmly about politics. Program also available in half- hour-long version at PRX.

Politics_medium_medium_small

80 percent of Americans find political campaigns uncivil and 85 percent say that politics in general is becoming more uncivil.  

On this special election season edition of Peace Talks Radio, an assessment of the degree of the problem, and some ideas on how to address it, from a number people.  We’ll hear from current Democratic congressman Tim Ryan of Ohio, former long-term Republican congresswoman Connie Morella from Maryland – both of whom actually agree on several things they think will help.  We’ll also talk with two media analysts - Western Washington University's Michael Karlberg and Hakim Bellamy of the Media Literacy Project, who’ll comment on the media’s role in heightening incivility in political discourse.  And we’ll hear from a woman who’s launched an online project she thinks may help things a bit, by taking a kitchen table around the country.  Paul Ingles hosts.

Program also available in half-hour long version on PRX: http://www.prx.org/pieces/84061

Seeking Civility in Political Discourse (29:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:03

On this election season edition of Peace Talks Radio, an assessment of the problem of incivility in political discourse - and some ideas on how to address it from a number people including a present member and a former member of Congress, two media analysts, and a reporter who covered Congress in the 1960's when, he says, it was all more civil and respectful. This program is also available in 59:00 and 54:00 versions at PRX - http://www.prx.org/pieces/83957

Politics_medium_medium_small

80 percent of Americans find political campaigns uncivil and 85 percent say that politics in general is becoming more uncivil.  

On this special election season edition of Peace Talks Radio, an assessment of the degree of the problem, and some ideas on how to address it, from a number people.  We’ll hear from current Democratic congressman Tim Ryan of Ohio, former long-term Republican congresswoman Connie Morella from Maryland – both of whom actually agree on several things they think will help.  We’ll also talk with two media analysts - Western Washington University's Michael Karlberg and Hakim Bellamy of the Media Literacy Project, who’ll comment on the media’s role in heightening incivility in political discourse.  And we’ll hear from veteran reporter Art Schreiber, who covered Congress in the 1960's when, he says, it was all more civil and respectful.  Paul Ingles hosts.

This program is also available in 59:00 and 54:00 versions at PRX - http://www.prx.org/pieces/83957

Peace Talks Radio: Electing Mediators To Public Office

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:01

If mediators are trained to resolve conflicts between disputing parties, what would happen if we elected more mediators to public office? That's the question explored this time on Peace Talks Radio, the series on peacemaking and nonviolent conflict resolution.

Barspeechbuntingflag_small With election cycles in constant motion, this time on Peace Talks Radio, we offer a conversation about the possible impact of electing mediators to public office. We'll talk with Dr. Dan Dana, a mediator and former candidate for the US House of Representatives in Missouri. After his failed, non-adversarial bid for office, Dan created the "Elect Mediators to Public Office" project. He believes that having more mediators in public office who use a non-adversarial approach to conflict resolution would result in better political processes and better government. Of the total U.S. work force, only 6 percent are lawyers. Yet 45 percent of the members of Congress are lawyers. Would more mediators in public office change political discourse? We'll talk with other mediators who have run for public office to learn how they hope to change public service including Texas Representative Henry Cuellar, 2006 Texas U.S. Senate candidate Barbara Ann Rodnofsky (pictured above), and former mayor of Manzanita, Oregon, Hugh McIssac. Suzanne Kryder is host. For a 29 minute version, visit that episode at PRX: http://www.prx.org/pieces/21115

Peace Talks Radio: Electing Mediators To Public Office (29:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:00

If mediators are trained to resolve conflicts between disputing parties, what would happen if we elected more mediators to public office? That's the question explored this time on Peace Talks Radio, the series on peacemaking and nonviolent conflict resolution.

Rephenrycuellarportrait_small With election cycles in constant motion, this time on Peace Talks Radio, we offer a conversation about the possible impact of electing mediators to public office. We'll talk with Dr. Dan Dana, a mediator and former candidate for the US House of Representatives in Missouri. After his failed, non-adversarial bid for office, Dan created the "Elect Mediators to Public Office" project. He believes that having more mediators in public office who use a non-adversarial approach to conflict resolution would result in better political processes and better government. Of the total U.S. work force, only 6 percent are lawyers. Yet 45 percent of the members of Congress are lawyers. Would more mediators in public office change political discourse? We'll talk with other mediators who have run for public office to learn how they hope to change public service including Texas Representative Henry Cuellar(pictured above), 2006 Texas U.S. Senate candidate Barbara Ann Rodnofsky, and former mayor of Manzanita, Oregon, Hugh McIssac. Suzanne Kryder is host. For a 54 minute or 59 minute version of the program, visit that episode at PRX: http://www.prx.org/pieces/21104

Peace Talks Radio: Changing Minds During Election Season (59:00 / 54:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 58:59

Insights into the mind-changing process that targets the undecided or conflicted voter from two authors who've written books about changing minds and from a political media specialist. Also a panel including political scientists and a journalist weigh in on political advertising.

Rep-demo_small Whenever election season rolls around, conflict between political camps really heats up. Differences over whom to support can even put friends and family members at odds with each other. Undecided voters may authentically be at odds with themselves. And it's often those undecided voters who swing close elections. In the month's leading up to election day, each candidate's campaign workers are trying their best to bring those conflicted voters their way, maybe even change the minds of some voters, whose support for a candidate might be soft. On this edition of PEACE TALKS RADIO, some insight into that mind-changing process that targets the undecided or conflicted voter. Host Suzanne Kryder talks with two people who have written extensively on changing minds, and a political media specialist whose job it is to change some minds. Guests include political media strategist Rachel Gorlin, also Howard Gardner, Harvard professor and author of the book Changing Minds, and Dave Straker, author of the website, changingminds.org and the book, Changing Minds: In Detail.  Also a panel including political scientists and a journalist weigh in on political advertising.

Peace Talks Radio: Changing Minds During Election Season (29:00)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 27:47

Insights into the mind-changing process that targets the undecided or conflicted voter from two authors who've written books about changing minds and from a political media specialist.

Rep-demo_small Whenever election season rolls around, conflict between political camps really heats up. Differences over whom to support can even put friends and family members at odds with each other. Undecided voters may authentically be at odds with themselves. And it's often those undecided voters who swing close elections. In the months leading up to election day, each candidate's campaign workers are trying their best to bring those conflicted voters their way, maybe even change the minds of some voters, whose support for a candidate might be soft. On this edition of PEACE TALKS RADIO, some insight into that mind-changing process that targets the undecided or conflicted voter. Host Suzanne Kryder talks with two people who have written extensively on changing minds, and a political media specialist whose job it is to change voters' minds. Guests are political media strategist Rachel Gorlin; Howard Gardner, Harvard professor and author of the book Changing Minds; and Dave Straker, author of the website, changingminds.org and the book, Changing Minds: In Detail. A 59:00 and 54:00 version of this program can be found at PRX: http://www.prx.org/pieces/29089