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Playlist: Celebrating Pride

Compiled By: Philosophy Talk

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Gay Pride and Prejudice

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 54:00

Why is the gay rights movement so threatening to some that it leads to moral panic?

Gay-pride-flag-738850_small The question of gay rights has become a hot button issue, with opposition taking on the air of a moral panic and support taking on the air of a righteous crusade. John and Ken attempt to dispassionately examine the competing scientific, religious, and philosophical visions of the nature of gayness. They explore the consequences of those competing arguments for and against gay rights with cultural and psychological anthropologist Gilbert Herdt, editor of Moral Panics, Sex Panics: Fear and the Fight over Sexual Rights.

Queerness

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:59

Is queerness just a marker of sexual orientation, or is it a political and social identity?

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Queerness
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51ky_innrvl Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Transsexual… it is safe to say that new ideas of gender and sexuality have broken into mainstream consciousness within the past few decades. What underlies each of these identities, however, is the notion of Queerness. But what defines what it means to be queer? Is it as much a political identity as it is a sexual or gender identity? How does ‘queerness’ subvert or challenge our notions of gender and sexuality? John and Ken welcome Susan Stryker from the University of Arizona, author of Transgender History: The Roots of Today's Revolution.

Polyamory

From Philosophy Talk | Part of the Philosophy Talk series | 53:58

We don't have only one friend at a time, so why have only one lover at a time?

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Polyamory
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Philosophy Talk

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In most if not all modern Western societies, monogamy is the dominant form of romantic relationship. In polyamorous or "open" relationships, however, each person is free to love multiple partners at once. Just as our friendships are non-exclusive, advocates of polyamory believe our romantic relationship should be too. So why do so many people find polyamory distasteful, or even despicable? Is it immoral to love more than one person at a time? Or is our society's commitment to monogamy simply a fossil of tradition that could one day be obsolete? The Philosophers welcome back Carrie Jenkins from the University of British Columbia, author of What Love Is: And What It Could Be.