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Playlist: ARCHIVED - Black History Month

Compiled By: PRX Administrator

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The Black Experience

From West Virginia Public Broadcasting | 01:57:00

Dr. Della Taylor Hardman made it her mission to talk to influential and promising African Americans inside and outside of West Virginia. Her interviews became the local Charleston radio show "The Black Experience." A professor, artist, poet, columnist, and photographer, the title radio host was just one of many hats she wore. Narrated by Peabody award-winning journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault.

Della_brown_hardman__phd_001_small Dr. Della Taylor Hardman made it her mission to talk to influential and promising African Americans inside and outside of West Virginia. Her interviews became the local Charleston radio show "The Black Experience." A professor, artist, poet, columnist, and photographer, the title radio host was just one of many hats she wore.

Narrated by Peabody award-winning journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault, this documentary revisits some of Dr. Hardman’s interviews from that time and offers reflections on her life from friends and family. 

Interviewees include Ralph Abernathy, Ann Baker, William Warfield, Gwendolyn Brooks, Scatman Crothers, Clint Thomas, Mary Thomas, Dr. Margaret Cyrus Mills, Carmen McRae, and Dorothy West.

Major funding for The Black Experience comes from the West Virginia Humanities Council.  Additional funding provided by West Virginia American Water.

Humankind: Justice Denied

From Humankind | Part of the Humankind Specials series | 58:59

How could a nation founded on a Declaration that "all men are created equal" permit slavery? Nowhere was this contradiction more stark than at the Supreme Court, which formally ruled in the Dred Scott case that black people have "no rights" -- a decision Abraham Lincoln adamantly opposed. In this one-hour Humankind special, produced in association with WGBH/Boston, we'll learn about harsh public reaction when federal judges enforced slavery through fugitive slave laws and the Dred Scott ruling.

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Ideal for broadcast around M.L. King Day or Black History Month, this one-hour Humankind special examines the fascinating historical role played by U.S. federal courts in enforcing slavery. Produced in association with WGBH/Boston.

We revisit how a Boston judge's decision to order a runaway slave returned to his Virginia owner provoked the largest abolitionist protest the nation had ever seen. Then an in-depth look at the Supreme Court's famous Dred Scott ruling -- adamantly opposed by Abraham Lincoln -- that blacks "have no rights a white man is bound to respect". To what extent did these and other cases inflame tensions leading to the Civil War and damage the reputation of the federal judiciary? Featuring Pulitzer Prize-winning Lincoln historian Eric Foner, Museum of African-American History director Beverly Morgan-Welch, Duke Univ. law professor Paul Finkelman as well as dramatic readings from Frederick Douglass and others.

William's Leap For Freedom

From Sue Zizza | 52:57

SueMedia Productions, in conjunction with the National Audio Theatre Festivals, (NATF) is offering "William’s Leap for Freedom" for Stations to broadcast during Black History Month 2011.

Hosted by Dion Graham, this one hour audio drama is available through the PRX to stations for free. This original play is based on the life of freed slave William Wells Brown. The performance was recorded live at the June 2010 NATF workshop in West Plains, Missouri and stars Mirron E. Willis as Wells Brown, and features Barbara Rosenblat along with a multi-voice cast.

"William’s Leap for Freedom" is a two part drama; a play within a play. Beginning with a fictionalized conversation between William Wells Brown and Mr. Polite, this audio dramatization then introduces part two of the play which features selected portions of "The Escape or Leap for Freedom," as it relates to the tale of three slaves, Cato, Glen and Melinda. Brown often stated that this play specifically was autobiographical. The couple, Glen and Melinda, did exist, while Cato is Brown himself.

This production, directed by Renee Pringle, with assistance from mentor Sue Zizza was post produced by SueMedia Production’s David Shinn.

Willim_wells_brown_small SueMedia Productions, in conjunction with the National Audio Theatre Festivals (NATF) is offering William's Leap for Freedom for stations to broadcast during Black History Month (February) 2011.

Hosted by Dion Graham, this one hour audio drama is available through the PRX for free. This original play is based on the life of freed slave William Wells Brown. The performance was recorded live at the June 2010 NATF workshop in West Plains, Missouri and stars Mirron E. Willis as Wells Brown and features Barbara Rosenblat along with a multi-voice cast.

William's Leap for Freedom is a two part drama; a play within a play. This performance, was adapted for audio from the stage play, William Wells Brown's Leap for Freedom written for the stage by Dr. Cheryl Black of the University of Missouri Department of Theatre.

Dr. Black's play was written and produced in 2008 for the Missouri State Historical society's Missouri History in Performance Theater. In 2009 it was adapted for the National Audio Theartre Festivals by Renee Pringle of NPR, with assistance from mentor Sue Zizza.

Beginning with a fictionalized conversation between William Wells Brown and Mr. Polite, this audio dramatization then introduces part two of the play which features selected portions of The Escape or Leap for Freedom, as it relates to the tale of three slaves, Cato, Glen and Melinda.  Brown often stated that this play specifically was autobiographical.  The couple, Glen and Melinda, did exist, while Cato is Brown himself.

ABOUT WILLIAM WELLS BROWN

Wells Brown was born a slave in Lexington, Kentucky in 1814.  It is said that his mother was the daughter of Daniel Boone and a black slave, while his father was known to be a member of the Wickliffe family of Kentucky and Louisiana.

Throughout his lifetime, Brown was a fugitive slave, a conductor on the Underground Railroad, an abolitionist, an anti-slavery lecturer, an historian, a medical doctor, and a poet.

Brown is the author of the first novel, the first drama, and the first travelogue published by an African American in the U.S.  His particular life experiences gave him a thorough education and with that came an understanding of human nature, and of American culture and society, from 1814 through 1884.

In 1856, Brown decided to stop giving lectures at paid abolitionist engagements and instead began performing his dramas.  Through drama he emphasized that all Americans, northern and southern, participated in deceptions necessary to support the system of slavery.

A popular form of drama at the time was the blackface minstrel.  Using minstrel comedy in reverse, Brown was able to dispel familiar stereotypes and ridicule the perpetrators of those misrepresentations.  In this way, Escape or Leap for Freedom is also a commentary on the minstrel style.

Brown consistently emphasized that blacks should use wit and trickery to fight against and survive their oppression, not heroic confrontation.  His dramas emphasize the oppressive circumstances of black and white women; sexual violence against black women; the emasculation of black men; the hypocrisy of the religious community, and the paradox of a system of slavery in America, the so-called land of liberty.

Brown was known as a trickster among scholars.  With guile, wit, and charm, he moved his white audiences to face issues without insulting them.

This production, directed by Pringle, with assistance from producer Sue Zizza was post produced by SueMedia Production's David Shinn.


The Legacy of Massive Resistance

From With Good Reason | 59:00

In 1959, Prince Edward County, Virginia closed its schools rather than integrate. The closures lasted for five years, and the people who were denied an education in Prince Edward County as children are now sharing their story.

Prince_edward_county_sign_small In 1951, a group of African American students at Robert R. Moton High School in Prince Edward County, Virginia, organized a strike to protest the substandard school facilities provided for black students. The walkout, led by 16-year-old Barbara Johns, is one of the great unsung stories in the struggle for Civil Rights. The student strike occurred four years before the actions of actions of Rosa Parks and nine years before the sit-ins throughout the South.  Their story is one of courage and persistence against what seemed at the time like overwhelming odds.  Eight years after the student walkout, rather than succumb to a federal mandate to integrate, the state of Virginia closed down the public schools in Prince Edward County as part of a policy called Massive Resistance. The closure lasted five years.  The program features interviews with former students who participated in the strike and others who describe their wrenching experience of being locked out and the difficult decisions parents made to ensure education for their children. Also featured are interviews with historians who put the policy and legacy of Massive Resistance into context of the history of the Civil Rights movement in this country.

The Children of Children Keep Coming

From WNPR | 51:01

Through story and song, author Russell Goings has adapted his epic poem “The Children of Children Keep Coming” into an hour-long spoken word performance that delineates and celebrates the too often unsung African American cultural history.

Goings_small Through story and song, author Russell Goings has adapted his epic poem “The Children of Children Keep Coming” into an hour-long spoken word performance that delineates and celebrates the too often unsung African American cultural history.  His inspiration comes from friendship of iconic collagist Romare Bearden and from the voices of the ancestors.

Infused with the improvisational feel of jazz, this program celebrates the soulful spirits of ancestors through Goings’ masterfully poetic prose.  Narratives of historical figures Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Frederick Douglass and Phillis Wheatley intertwine with mythic characters Evalina, Banjo Pete and Black Tiny Shiny to tell the important story of the African American heroic journey.  

With introduction by acclaimed Tony Award winning Broadway actor Brian Stokes Mitchell, the radio adaptation of “The Children” will be available for broadcast on public radio stations nationwide starting Black History Month, February 2010.  It is the first part of a yearlong audio and lecture series exploring African-American narratives through art and storytelling, in partnership with WNPR – Connecticut Public Radio and Fairfield University.


Russell Goings graduated with honors from Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1959.  He briefly played professional football, and then headed to Wall Street to become the first African-American brokerage manager for a New York Stock Exchange member firm.  Later, he became the first black owner of an investment firm, which managed the assets of some of the world’s largest companies along with many legendary athletes and entertainers.  He was founder of Essence Magazine and became the chairman of the Studio Museum in Harlem.  Goings is an inductee into the Wall Street Hall of Fame.  He spent thirteen years writing the “Children”, studying under Pulitzer Prize nominee and Fairfield University poetry professor Kim Bridgford. 

Say It Plain: A Century of African American Oratory

From American Public Media | Part of the American RadioWorks: Black History series | 59:59

For generations, African American orators have been demanding justice and equality, reminding America to make good on its founding principles of democracy. Hear some of these seminal speeches in "Say It Plain."

Mlk_image When the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.'s I Have a Dream speech is broadcast each February to mark Black History Month, the magnetic cadence of his words is almost impossible to resist. King was a remarkable orator, but he was hardly alone. He was nurtured in a centuries-old African American tradition of spoken narrative and oral persuasion. Like black speakers before and after him, King testified to how America betrayed its founding ideals through slavery, segregation and racial bigotry. King and scores of other black orators sounded the charge against Jim Crow and stung the moral conscience of America. Many powered their messages with relentless optimism that one day change would come. They reminded Americans of how good they could be. Others offered a different version of utopia: a separate nation free of whites. This dramatic and moving program highlights a selection of landmark sermons, speeches and broadcasts by African American orators over the past century. From Booker T. Washington and Marcus Garvey, to Fannie Lou Hamer and Malcolm X, to Shirley Chisholm and Julian Bond, listeners will hear the stirring words of African American figures as they call for action on civil rights and the unmet promise of democracy. Say it Plain will give listeners a vivid audio portrait of black Americans exhorting the nation to make good on its democratic principles and, in so doing, actually changing the country.

Ruby Elzy: Black Diva of the Thirties

From Boyce Lancaster | 58:59

Ruby Elzy was one of George Gershwin's hand picked leads for the original production of Porgy and Bess. Hailing from the small Mississippi town of Pontotoc, Ruby Elzy's voice carried her to Ohio State University, Julliard, Broadway, and concerts coast to coast. Tragically, her life would end before she took the next step to the Metropolitan Opera stage in Aida. This program is based upon the book Black Diva of the Thirties - The Life of Ruby Elzy, by David E. Weaver, published by the University Press of Mississippi. Archival recordings for this program were also provided by Mr. Weaver.

Ruby1937_small Ruby Elzy was one of George Gershwin's hand picked leads for the original production of Porgy and Bess.  Hailing from the small Mississippi town of Pontotoc, Ruby Elzy's voice carried her to Ohio State University, Juilliard, Broadway, and concerts coast to coast.  Tragically, her life would end before she took the next step to the Metropolitan Opera stage in Aida.

In the year 2000, soprano Ruby Elzy was one of the first inductees into the Mississippi Musicians Hall of Fame. Sixty-five years earlier, she was chosen by George Gershwin to create the role of Serena in Porgy and Bess. Ruby appeared in feature films with Paul Robeson and Bing Crosby. She attended The Ohio State University and Juilliard School of Music and performed on Broadway, in Hollywood, and on national radio.
Ruby would have been one of the first black artists to appear in grand opera had she lived beyond her 35 years. 
  This program is based upon the book Black Diva of the Thirties - The Life of Ruby Elzy, by David E. Weaver, published by the University Press of Mississippi.  Archival recordings for this program were also provided by Mr. Weaver.

Chasing the Crescent Moon: The Story of Dr. Frempong and Sickle Cell Disease

From Aaron Schwartz | 59:00

A documentary exploring sickle cell disease and an extraordinary doctor who is fighting the illness in Philadelphia and West Africa.

Crescentlogowithoutfill_small A genetic disease mostly affecting those of African descent, sickle cell produces debilitating pain and a life sometimes cut short, especially for the undiagnosed. And as a burden largely borne by the underprivileged, sickle cell is not just a medical problem, but a social one. Chasing the Crescent Moon explores the challenges posed by sickle cell through the story of one physician and the lives he has touched. Dr. Kwaku Ohene-Frempong grew from a child of Ghanaian cocoa farmers to become a Yale scholar, an Olympic athlete, and one of the most important international warriors against sickle cell. He also bore a son who suffers from the disease. In his greatest accomplishment, Dr. Frempong established the only city-wide newborn screening for sickle cell in all of West Africa, where 1 in 50 babies suffers from the illness. The documentary relates Dr. Frempong's remarkable journey as well as the dramatic stories of his coworkers, staff, patients and their families. Set in Ghana and Philadelphia, the documentary travels from the high tech Comprehensive Sickle Cell Clinic that Dr. Frempong heads at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia to his overcrowded Ghanaian clinic. The stories educate, advocate and entrance, conveying the unusual medical and social burdens faced by those fighting sickle cell. Available free to all stations. The program includes two 59-second breaks (with music beds) at 22:56 and 40:49.

Can You Hear Me?

From Claire Schoen | Part of the ILLUMINATIONS: Jewish Culture in the Light of the World series | 59:01

"Can Your Hear Me?" is an hour-long audio documentary exploring the history of conflict and coalition between Blacks and Jews in America.
Claire Schoen and Naomi Neuman - CoProducers.
A Traveling Jewish Theatre - Executive Producer

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"Can Your Hear Me?" is an hour-long audio documentary exploring the history of conflict and coalition between Blacks and Jews in America.

Claire Schoen and Naomi Neuman - CoProducers.
A Traveling Jewish Theatre - Executive Producer

Over the decades, the relationship between African Americans and Jewish Americans has been a push and pull of common
interests and mutual recriminations. During the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960's the Jewish concept of "Tikkun Olam" or Repairing the World was a driving force for young Jewish activists who went to the South to register Black voters and link arms with Black protesters. African Americans embraced these Jews as brothers and sisters from another oppressed group. However, with the rise of Black nationalism at home and increased turmoil in Israel, this hopeful period was followed by an angry break between the two groups, resulting in racism and anti-Semitism. "Can Your Hear Me" follows this saga and then looks at how these two cultures have worked towards reconciliation through a rediscovery of their common humanity. (Each of the 3 shows in this series can be broadcast as stand-alone programs.)

Black Women Make History/ Coretta Scott King & Carol Moseley Braun

From KSFR | Part of the Equal Time with Martha Burk series | 56:48

Equal Time Series Host Martha Burk explores the life of Coretta Scott King with biographer Barbara Reynolds, a founding editor of USA Today. Burk also interviews Carol Moseley Braun, the first and only Black woman elected to the U.S. Senate. Includes audio from Coretta King's 1996 Atlanta speech.

King_small Dr. Barbara Reynolds spent many hours with Coretta Scott King over a period of 25 years, recording her thoughts and stories of the civil rights struggle as partner to Martin Luther King Jr., and her continuing activism for many causes after his death.  Following an audio clip from one of Coretta King's speeches, Reynolds talks about what Mrs. King wanted to leave as a legacy, why she felt she was not a mere helpmate, and her dreams for the future of race relations in the United States and around the world.

Carol Moseley Braun discusses her historic victory as the first and only Black woman elected to the U.S. Senate, including ethics charges brought against her and dismissed.  She explores her childhood in a segregated society, and her subsequent time as Ambassador to New Zealand, ending with her assessment of where Black women and men are today in achieving political, economic, and social equality.
 
Full single file version includes both interviews, divided into 4 segments (2 x 30 sec. breaks midway in each half, 2 x 30 sec at bottom of hour).  See detail in Timing and Cues.


Separate modules are Coretta King Module (2 x 30 sec breaks midway) and and Moseley-Braun Module ( 2 x 30 sec midway).  See detail in Timing and Cues.

The Writ Writer - part 1

From Guy Rathbun | 58:57

This is a story that begs to be told. It’s long overdue.
The year was 1919. The place: Phillips County, Arkansas.

What became a watershed moment in black history, this is the story of Scipio Africanus Jones, and one man’s gallant and courageous effort to fight murder convictions brought against 134 black sharecroppers, 12 of whom were sentenced to die in the electric chair.

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Very few are aware of what became known as “The Elaine Massacre,” where hundreds of blacks were murdered and five white men were killed. Nor are many aware that Scipio Jones, a black attorney from Little Rock, Arkansas succeeded against all odds, and brought about the reversal of several lower court decisions. His tenacity resulted in the release of all of the imprisoned black sharecroppers; this included the 12 men sentenced to die.

Humankind: Meeting Hate With Love -- Stories of King and Gandhi

From Humankind | 59:02

Explorations on the non-violence philosophies shared by King and Gandhi

Kingbannerorange277_small SEGMENT 1: More than an advocate of racial equality, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was a practitioner of peaceful resistance to prejudice, and in this documentary we explore the philosophical and historical roots of King's non-violent movement. SEGMENT 2: Further explorations of non-violence with Mahatma Gandhi's grandson, Dr. Arun Gandhi (now in his 70s) who as a troubled teenager was tutored daily by the spiritual / political leader, gaining an intimate glimpse into the life and beliefs of a remarkable twentieth century figure.

The Undiscovered Explorer: Imagining York

From Claire Schoen | 01:03:13

One hour documentary, narrated by Danny Glover, that explores the making of an American myth.

Glover1_small The Undiscovered Explorer: Imagining York explores the making of an American myth. This hour-long audio documentary, narrated by Danny Glover, is a production of Oregon Public Broadcasting. Through a rich weave of music, interviews, performance and dramatic readings, this program tells the story of York, William Clark's slave and the only African American member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. York's story is both heroic and tragic. He began life as the childhood playmate of Clark, but at age 12 their relationship was transformed into that of master and slave. On the Expedition, York experienced a rare level of freedom and equality, working shoulder to shoulder with white men. Upon their return, the other members of the Corps of Discovery were welcomed home with gifts and praise. York was plunged back into bondage and subservience, which ultimately shattered his life. The facts of York's story are based on fragmentary evidence. Forbidden by law to read and write, York left no written record of his own. We only know about him through the writings and stories of others. Depictions of York have changed through time, always colored by the social era in which they are told. York has been characterized as a valiant hero, an insolent and sulky slave and a happy, dancing darkie. Yet, how York himself really felt about his experiences remains a total mystery. Today, artists and historians continue to give words to this man who has no voice in history. Poetry, opera and rap -- all in York's "voice" -- are being performed as part of the current bicentennial celebration of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. A look at how York is portrayed through history opens the door to many questions about American society at large and about how history is recorded, remembered and created. It is this aspect of York -- the "Invisible Man" who exists only as a reflection of ourselves -- that informs this documentary.

Peace Talks Radio: Ralph Bunche - Profile in Peace (59:00/54:00/29:00)[Black History Month Offering]

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Hour Long Episodes series | 59:01

A conversational profile of Ralph Bunche - a sometimes overlooked African-American who excelled in the world of diplomacy. Bunche negotiated tirelessly across the globe for the United Nations for over 25 years after World War 2, winning a Nobel Peace Prize for peacemaking work in the Middle East and helping to bring independence from colonial rule to many Africans and Asians.

Ralphbunche1_small Peace Talks: The radio series about peacemaking and nonviolent conflict resolution strategies. This is one of many newscast friendly hours that are currently available from Good Radio Shows, Inc. and producer Paul Ingles. In the middle part of the 20th century, if there was a news story about a peacemaking mission around the globe, chances are it contained the name of African-American diplomat Ralph Bunche. A scholar of world affairs and race relations, Bunche was recruited from academia first into the U.S. State Department, then into the fledgling United Nations. He stepped boldly onto the world stage as a peace negotiator and advocate for the liberation of peoples of color from colonial rule. Along the way, he was targeted and cleared of communist allegations, criticized as a pawn of the white establishment, and ultimately heralded as a role model for all in human relations. Today on Peace Talks, a profile in peace featuring Ralph Bunche. We'll highlight just a few chapters from this remarkable life, and try to take away some lessons about peacemaking as we talk with Bunche's UN colleague and biographer Sir Brian Urquhart, William Greaves, a filmmaker who produced a PBS documentary on Bunche, Tonya Covington, a diversity trainer inspired by Bunche, and with Ralph Bunche Jr., son of the late Ralph Bunche.   Since this program was produced in 2006, two of the guests have passed away - Filmmaker William Greaves in 2014 and Ralph Bunche Jr. in 2016.

Dear Birth Mother

From Long Haul Productions | Part of the Becoming a Mom series | 28:58

After waiting for Mr. Right (who has yet to arrive) - and after years of fertility treatments - Suzanne, a single woman in her forties, decided to adopt. She chose transracial adoption.

Suz_loretta_small After waiting in vain for Mr. Right - and after years of fertility treatments - Suzanne, a single, white woman in her forties, decided to adopt. She chose transracial adoption. Long Haul Productions documented the entire process - beginning with workshops designed to "teach white people to raise kids of color," baby-shopping trips with Mom at Target, a critical rendezvous with a young mother at a pancake house, and, finally, a magical night at a suburban restaurant chain. Producers Dan Collison and Elizabeth Meister followed Suzanne for several months as she waited to see if she would become a parent; she offered extraordinary access into her home, and really, into every aspect of her life. This piece debuted on May 9, 2005, on WBEZ (Chicago Public Radio), and subsequently aired May 10, 2005, on All Things Considered. "Dear Birth Mother" is a follow-up to "Babyquest," also available on PRX, which documents Suzanne's failed attempt to get pregnant via In Vitro fertilization.

No Argument Here

From With Good Reason | 29:00

A college professor is following the footsteps of a civil rights icon James Farmer, by training his students in the art of debate. Lydia Wilson, of the radio program "With Good Reason," has more.

Farmer_small Civil Rights icon James Farmer's skilled oratory was shaped in part as a member of the legendary debate team portrayed in the 2007 film, The Great Debaters. Timothy O’Donnell is furthering Farmer's footsteps by developing high-quality debate teams at historically black colleges and universities.  Also: As entrepreneurs in a largely segregated trade, African-American funeral directors were among the few black individuals who were economically independent.  Suzanne Smith, in her book, To Serve the Living, shows how their financial freedom gave them the ability to support the struggle for civil rights as well as bury the dead.

Between Civil War and Civil Rights -7a: Lynching's End?: A Texas Whydunnit Murder Mystery (1930)

From Alan Lipke | Part of the Between Civil War and Civil Rights series | 29:30

Mob madness leads to a pivotal feminist protest during the dark days of Jim Crow racism.

Shermancourthouse_small In one of the last incidents of the so-called "race riot era," thousands of white men, women and children besieged, burned, dynamited, [acetylene-] torched and destroyed the stately Grayson County (Texas) Courthouse, to get at a confessed black rapist on trial inside. The mob drove off Texas Rangers and National Guards, then went on to terrorize the town of Sherman's black community and torch the black business district. African-Americans, scholars and citizens alike still struggle to understand why it happened. But one immediate result was the formation of the pivotal Association of Southern [White] Women for the Prevention of Lynching. Based on extraordinary eyewitness oral history interviews by locally-based history professor Donna Kumler and others, this powerful, music-rich 29-minute documentary explores attitudes towards racial violence; mob-rule and mass-psychology; early racist-, feminist-, and pro-civil rights organizations and activities; race and gender relations; faith, endurance, and fate.

Nightfall in Chester County

From Helen Borten | Part of the A Sense of Place series | 29:29

In Pennsylvania farmland that was the first stop on the Underground Railroad, a strike by Mexican mushroom pickers polarizes a Quaker community.

Default-piece-image-1 In Pennsylvania farmland that was the first stop on the Underground Railroad, a strike by Mexican mushroom pickers polarizes a Quaker community. From historical chronicles of escaped slaves to the present-day inequalities of immigrants who also followed the North Star,this program traces the journey and ordeals of two groups who arrived at the same place,separated in time but connected by their hopes for a better life. One :30 Promo (click "listen" page, promo labeled "Segment 2")

Improving Race Relations: An African-American Perspective (Peace Talks Radio Series)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 28:55

A panel of three African-Americans reflect on their greatest challenges and successes in resolving racial conflict throughout their lives.

Jameslewis1_small History is filled with examples of conflict between different races. Periodically, Peace Talks Radio will explore efforts to resolve that conflict from different racial perspectives. This time, we get the African American perspective. Our guests are three African Americans ? each born of a different generation and raised in different circumstances and locales. They reflect on their greatest challenges and successes in resolving racial conflict throughout their lives. They also share specific steps that members of all races can take to make peace with each other. Our guests are Tonya Covington, Racial Justice Coordinator for the Middle Rio Grande YWCA in Albuquerque, New Mexico; James Lewis, Chief Operating Officer for the City of Albuquerque (pictured above), and Othiamba Umi, a student at the University of New Mexico. Although the guests are all currently living in New Mexico, the topic and discussion is generic. Suzanne Kryder hosts. -- Tonya Covington on White Privilege: "A lot of whites don?t believe that it exists and don?t believe that they have any privilege in being white. But there are certain things that come to you naturally or come to you easily because of the color of your skin that don?t come to us. Studies have shown that if two people walk into a store, one white, one black, the security guard is going to follow the black person regardless if they do any thing wrong or regardless of what the white person is like." James Lewis on prejudice: "As the only African-American elected state-wide in the state of New Mexico (as State Treasurer), I had a chance to go to New York for a bond closing. We had some bankers to pick us up at the airport...a white American was with me. They had a car to come pick us up and the bankers walked up to him assuming that he is Mr. Lewis, the treasurer, and walked right by me."

Martin Luther King Jr.'s Path To Nonviolence -29:00 Version (Peace Talks Radio Series)

From Good Radio Shows, Inc. | Part of the Peace Talks Radio: Weekly Half Hour Episodes series | 29:01

Martin Luther King Jr.'s journey to a philosophy of nonviolence and his lasting legacy as a peace proponent is recalled in interviews with his daughter, Yolanda King, and one of King's top colleagues in the civil rights movement, Dr. Dorothy Cotton. This program is also available in a 59:00 version available at PRX.

Yolandaking_small IMPORTANT: Please have your local announcer read the following script before and after this show. "The following (preceding) program, featuring an interview with Yolanda King, the daughter of the late Martin Luther King Jr., was recorded in 2004. Yolanda King died, at the age of 51, May 15, 2007." PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Two women with very close ties to Martin Luther King Jr. reflect on how King developed into one of the great moral and political philosophers of the 20th century and how his philosophies might still guide the world through troubled times today. Dr. Dorothy Cotton was the highest ranking female in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, founded by Dr. King. From 1960 to 1972 Dr. Cotton was the educational director for SCLC and worked very closely with Dr. King. The late Yolanda King was the eldest daughter of Dr. King. She was an internationally known motivational speaker and actress whose personal mission in life was to inspire positive social change and world peace. Ms. King died in May of 2007 at the age of 51. Ms. King and Dr. Cotton were interviewed separately in 2004 by phone by show host Carol Boss.  A newscast compatible 59 minute version of this program is available at PRX: http://www.prx.org/piece/3123 Promos for this program are also contained at the site for the 59:00 version.

Chasing After the Hurricane: A Personal Look Into the Life of Rubin "Hurricane" Carter - After the Movie.

From N Lorde | 14:07

A personal insight into the life of former boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter - his life after the blockbuster hit movie.

Niseanandthehurricane_small On April 20, 2014, Rubin Carter passed away from terminal prostate cancer. This is an in-depth radio documentary on the boxer and how he fought to help those who were wrongfully convicted in North America. The feature delves into Mr. Carter's personal life (i.e. it provides listeners with an interesting tour of his house in Toronto) and reveals the downward struggle many people, specifically young black men, face in North America's criminal justice system. 

Background: 
Rubin's life struggle was portrayed through the 1999 movie "The Hurricane". (Denzel Washington played Rubin.) In 1975, Bob Dylan wrote a song about Rubin's innocence entitled, "Hurricane." In the 1960s, Rubin was one of the world's best, professional, middle-weight boxers. In 1967, he was found guilty of committing a triple murder at the Lafayette Grill in Paterson, New Jersey. He served nearly 20 years in prison. In 1986, Federal Court Judge H. Lee Sarokin exonerated Rubin of the crimes. The judge ruled that the state withheld evidence in its attempt to get the killers.