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Playlist: Assorted Stuff

Compiled By: Jeff Conner

 Credit:
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Reel Discovery (Series)

Produced by Kristin Dreyer Kramer

Most recent piece in this series:

Reel Discovery: Charlie Says

From Kristin Dreyer Kramer | Part of the Reel Discovery series | 03:00

Charliesays_small Each week on Reel Discovery, host Kristin Dreyer Kramer takes a quick look at the latest in movies -- from the hottest new blockbusters to little-known indies and even Blu-ray releases. Whether you prefer explosive action movies or quiet dramas, you're sure to discover something worth watching. On the latest show, KKristin gets to know the Manson Girls in Charlie Says.

To read the full review, visit NightsAndWeekends.com.

Groks Science Radio Show (Series)

Produced by Charles Lee

Most recent piece in this series:

Scientific Attitude -- Groks Science Show 2019-05-15

From Charles Lee | Part of the Groks Science Radio Show series | 20:59

Grokscience_small Scientific findings are under increasing attack from pseudoscientific views.  Why does this persist and what can be done to address this issue?  On this episode, Lee C. McIntyre discussed the scientific attitude.

Travelers In The Night (Series)

Produced by Al Grauer

Most recent piece in this series:

540-Loneliest Asteroid

From Al Grauer | Part of the Travelers In The Night series | 02:00

Esa-neo_small Please see the transcript.

Celtic Connections (Series)

Produced by WSIU

Most recent piece in this series:

Celtic Connections 1920

From WSIU | Part of the Celtic Connections series | 58:29

Celticconnections_small

Since the Celtic albums of 2015 are no longer new enough to be included in our monthly New Releases programs, we will feature some previously unheard tracks from albums released that year in this week's Celtic Connections!  Featuring Socks in the Frying Pan, Buttons & Bows, Marie Fielding, Alyth McCormack, Jim Malcolm and more!

Celtic Connections offers radio listeners a wide variety of traditional and contemporary music associated with the western European lands occupied at one time or another by people of the Celtic tribes and their descendants, including Ireland, Scotland, the Isle of Man, Wales, Cornwall, Brittany, and Galicia, as well as Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, and other parts of North America where the Celtic influence has been felt.

 

The program's host, Bryan Kelso Crow, also brings you great music from England and from Scandinavia and other European regions, all of which have connections with a Celtic past.

 

Each week on Celtic Connections, you can count on hearing the finest selections from new releases as well as from Celtic classics. We also offer occasional concert performances, recorded exclusively for Celtic Connections, along with original interviews with some of the top names in the Celtic music world.

Blank on Blank (Series)

Produced by Blank on Blank

Most recent piece in this series:

Alvin Toffler and Margaret Mead: Future Shock, Innocence and Innovation

From Blank on Blank | Part of the Blank on Blank series | 16:07

Theexperimenterslogo_social_chalkboardgreen_small Alvin Toffler and Margaret Mead: an author and an anthropologist who endeavored to understand the impact of scientific invention. In this episode of our series, The Experimenters, we hear from two visionaries who believed that while we’ve started a technological revolution, we don’t quite know where it’s going to take us. But maybe most interesting of all – we get to hearing these archival interviews from the very future these thinkers were trying to imagine. Mead and Toffler guide us into a view of what the present might have been — or perhaps in some ways actually came to pass.

Science Update (Series)

Produced by Science Update

Most recent piece in this series:

Giraffe Spot Inheritance

From Science Update | Part of the Science Update series | 01:00

Sciupdate_sm2_small Scientists discover that giraffes inherit their spots.

Xpressions (Series)

Produced by Don Hill

Most recent piece in this series:

Ping

From Don Hill | Part of the Xpressions series | 01:44

Playing
Ping
From
Don Hill

Prx_photo_xpressions_update_small XPRESSIONS is a cheap & cheerful 'drop in' interstitial. Makes a great daily or weekend feature! Pieces are added weekly. And if you'd like the whole series --all 318 items -- just ping me!  

Authentic South (Series)

Produced by Tanner Latham

Most recent piece in this series:

Resurrecting Slave Cabins at Montpelier (7:00 version)

From Tanner Latham | Part of the Authentic South series | 07:12

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This episode of Authentic South begins over 200 years ago. In the late 1700s, there was a famous French general named La Fayette. (Lafee-ette) He was a champion of the American cause during our Revolution, and he actually fought under George Washington. He became a national hero here. And after the war, he traveled around our country and was showered with praise.

 

Streets were named in his honor. Monuments that still stand in town squares were erected to him. Cities were named after him, including, interestingly, Fayetteville, North Carolina.

 

This guy was a big deal.  

 

And during one of his trips in 1825, La Fayette visited James and Dolley Madison at their home Montpelier in Virginia. And the French general wrote that one of the most interesting sights he witnessed in America was the log cabin there of a woman named Granny Millie. She was a slave who was 104 years old at the time, and she lived with her daughter and granddaughter. We know that when La Fayette met her, she showed him her only treasure, an old worn copy of the ancient book Telemachus.

 

For years, at historic plantation sites across the South, the focus was on the big house and not on the slave cabins such as Granny Millie’s. But as contributor Kelley Libby tells us, cabins like that are being resurrected on the grounds of Montpelier.

 

Kelley Libby is an associate producer for a program called With Good Reason, produced by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities. That’s where this story first aired. For more information on the Slave Dwelling Project, visit slavedwellingproject.org.

 

As always, the Authentic South theme is by Chris Hoke and Brett Estep.

 

And to see pictures of the cabins and to hear other episodes of the show, click on over to AuthenticSouth.com. You can also find us on iTunes and Stitcher Radio and SoundCloud. We are part of the Public Radio Exchange (prx.org) and we’ve got our own page at WFAE.org.

 

Until we go South again, thanks for listening.  

CurrentCast (Series)

Produced by ChavoBart Digital Media

Most recent piece in this series:

CurrentCast programming for May 27, 2019 - June 21, 2019

From ChavoBart Digital Media | Part of the CurrentCast series | 20:00

Cc_square_logo_240_small CurrentCast is a daily, 60-second radio feature that educates the public about water issues, promotes an appreciation for aquatic environments, and encourages an educated discussion about this critical resource. This 4-week round includes the following pieces:

Air Date - Title

Mon., 5/27 - Just Add Water: Once drained to make room for agriculture, Hennepin and Hopper Lakes have undergone a dramatic transformation.

Tue., 5/28 - Protecting the Fruit of One’s Labor: By putting their property in a land trust, fruit farmers can help protect water quality.

Wed., 5/29 - A Bird’s-Eye View of Grassland Restoration: Healthy grasslands help protect water quality and support our feathered friends.

Thu., 5/30 - Helping Fish Survive an Urban Gauntlet: Man-made islands provide a place for young fish to rest and eat as they travel through the Milwaukee Estuary.

Fri., 5/31 - Why Didn’t the Fish Cross the Road? A scientist has mapped the dams and road crossings that inhibit fish movement in the Great Lakes region.

Mon., 6/3 - A Biological Gem: The Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore is more than sand and waves.

Tue., 6/4 - A Villain on the Move: If Asian carp get into Lake Erie, it could take a toll on Ohio’s tourism and travel industries.

Wed., 6/5 - Baby Beluga in the Deep Blue… River? Beluga whales are found in the Saint Lawrence River, but their population is declining.

Thu., 6/6 - Try Not to Get Carried Away: The currents and sandy shores of the Great Lakes can create rip currents as dangerous as those in the ocean.  

Fri., 6/7 - For Pet’s Sake – Avoid the Algae: Not all algae is harmful, but there’s no way to know which is which.

Mon., 6/10 - Swimming in Sewage: Some cities have combined sewer systems that can overflow during heavy storms – sending untreated sewage into rivers and lakes.

Tue., 6/11 - Less Lawn, More Native Landscaping: Lake-front landscaping is key to water quality.

Wed., 6/12 - Climate Woes in Pennsylvania’s Waterways: Climate change is bringing warmer, wetter weather to the Keystone state.

Thu., 6/13 - European Frogbit: This attractive water plant is a ruthless invader.

Fri., 6/14 - Blazing trails in Michigan: Marked water trails in this state make it easy for people to give paddling a try.

Mon., 6/17 - Dams: The Good and the Bad: Dams provide many important benefits to society, but the benefits must be balanced with the impact on river ecosystems.

Tue., 6/18 - Prairie Grasses: Prairie grasses native to the Midwest can improve water quality and help prevent erosion during heavy rains.

Wed., 6/19 - Rain Gardens: Rain gardens are an effective way to capture and slow rainwater, allowing it to seep slowly into the ground.

Thu., 6/20 - Teaching Kids to Save Water: There are fun and simple ways to teach children to save water.

Fri., 6/21 - Stream Restoration: When farmers institute measures to improve the health of streams on their property, it also improves the health of their herd.

American Routes (Series)

Produced by American Routes

Most recent piece in this series:

19-21: NEA National Heritage Fellows 2018, 5/22/2019

From American Routes | Part of the American Routes series | 01:58:59

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We celebrate America's diverse heritage by spotlighting the 2018 National Endowment for the Arts Heritage Fellows — recognized for their excellence in folk and traditional arts. Live in concert, Texas guitar maven and singer Barbara Lynn commands the stage with her brand of Gulf Coast rhythm & blues; old-time fiddler Eddie Bond shreds Appalachian-style; Don & Cindy Roy from Gorham, Maine, punch out French reels; and New York City cultural documentarian Ethel Raim sings a Yiddish song of her own. We talk tradition and technique with Native American basket-weaver Kelly Church; Palestinian embroiderer Feryal Abbasi-Ghnaim; rodeo tailor Manuel Cuevas; Chicana altarista Ofelia Esparza and African American quilter Marion Coleman. And we revisit performances and conversations with past NEA fellows like Hawaiian slack-key guitarist Ledward Ka’apana, circus aerialist Dolly Jacobs, soul singer Mavis Staples and the late guitar virtuoso Doc Watson, among others.

Footlight Parade: Sounds of the American Musical (Series)

Produced by Footlight Parade

Most recent piece in this series:

Footlight Parade: Television Musicals (Part 1) (FP19:21)

From Footlight Parade | Part of the Footlight Parade: Sounds of the American Musical series | 57:43

Fp1921_small A fascinating topic! Many of our best songwriters created them, and we'll feature Rodgers and Hammerstein's "Cinderella," Cole Porter's "Aladdin," Hugh Martin's "Hans Brinker" and even Jule Styne and Bob Merrill's "Mr. Magoo's Christmas Carol."

BITS: THE ART OF COMMUNICATION (Series)

Produced by Halli Casser-Jayne

Most recent piece in this series:

BITS: RICHARD ARMOUR

From Halli Casser-Jayne | Part of the BITS: THE ART OF COMMUNICATION series | :55

Bitdotcom_small

What is BITS? We start with the varied definitions of bit. A bit can be a small portion, degree, or amount such as a bit of lint; a bit of luck. On the other hand a bit can be a brief amount of time, a moment as in Wait a bit. Or how about a short scene or episode in a theatrical performance? Or a bit part? Keeping with our theatrical theme, a bit can be an entertainment routine given regularly by a performer; an act. Let’s take our definition of bit further. A bit can be the sharp part of a tool, such as the cutting edge of a knife or ax or a particular kind of action, situation, or behavior as in I got tired of the macho bit. How about a matter being considered as in What's this bit about inflation? The Brits consider a bit a small coin: a three penny bit. BITS for our purposes are an amalgamation of all and is about our bit to contribute and share by bringing you a bit of knowledge as information and entertainment, and as a matter to be considered. So have a listen to our brief, daily dose of BITS where a little knowledge goes a long way brought to you by the artist of communication Halli Casser-Jayne, host of The Halli Casser-Jayne Show, Talk Radio for Fine Minds. For more information visit bit.ly/YEswYS.

The Audubon Moment (Series)

Produced by John Nelson

Most recent piece in this series:

The Crested Caracara

From John Nelson | Part of the The Audubon Moment series | 01:00

Roseate_spoonbill_flight_small

The Audubon Moment is a series dedicated to helping listeners in your radio market identify the birds that can be found in their own back yard or local environment. Over 100 segments have been produced for this series with is funded through a grant from Toyota Together Green by Audubon.

With over 47 million American's identifying themselves as birders, this series could be a valuable tool in bringing in new members to your public radio listening audience.

Vinyl Cafe (Series)

Produced by Vinyl Cafe

Most recent piece in this series:

The Vinyl Cafe February 14th, 2016, "Break Up Songs"

From Vinyl Cafe | Part of the Vinyl Cafe series | 54:01

Stuart-smiling_small It’s break-up music on the show today.

Gems of Bluegrass (Series)

Produced by Philip Nusbaum

Most recent piece in this series:

Another Look at Evolving With Body and Soul

From Philip Nusbaum | Part of the Gems of Bluegrass series | 06:44

Phil_w_zeitfunk_small Bluegrass music is in a constant state of evolution. Bluegrass artists are drawn to the catalog of songs by the Father of Bluegrass music, Bill Monroe. One of the popular songs from the Monroe canon, is With Body and Soul.

PRX Remix Select (Series)

Produced by PRX Remix

Most recent piece in this series:

Remix Select: Episode 420, 5/22/2019

From PRX Remix | Part of the PRX Remix Select series | 59:00

Prx_remix_logo_square-2c_small

  • PRX's Mission
    Genevieve at PRX
    00:00:26
  • The Boogie Man of Ocean Point
    Galen Koch - Salt Institute for Documentary Studies
    00:08:50
  • PRX- Projecting on the Inner Screen
    Roman Mars
    00:00:35
  • Gary Burton and Julian Lage
    JazzStories
    00:16:42
  • Stories to Me- PRX Remix
    Roman Mars
    00:00:28
  • Matthew Perry Jr.
    Moments of the Movement
    00:03:29
  • Talk Man! 1986
    Tape Findings
    00:00:14
  • How Musical They Sound
    PRX Remix
    00:00:27
  • Cristina Orbe Discusses High Fidelity
    The Bushwick Book Club Seattle Presents
    00:05:00
  • We Believe in Public Radio Remix
    Jay Allison and Roman Mars
    00:00:29
  • Nothing Good Happens After Midnight
    Things That Go Boom
    00:21:25
  • Remix Coast to Coast incl KALW
    Roman Mars
    00:00:33
  • Couldn't Hear Me over the Music (Inst)
    Kev Brown
    00:00:47

Says You! Full Hour Show (Series)

Produced by Says You!

Most recent piece in this series:

SY-823R: Says You! 823R, 5/24/2019

From Says You! | Part of the Says You! Full Hour Show series | :00

no audio file

Shelf Discovery (Series)

Produced by Kristin Dreyer Kramer

Most recent piece in this series:

Shelf Discovery: Brief Chronicle of Another Stupid Heartbreak by Adi Alsaid

From Kristin Dreyer Kramer | Part of the Shelf Discovery series | 03:00

Briefchronicle_small Each week on Shelf Discovery, host Kristin Dreyer Kamer offers listeners a brief look inside the pages of a new book. From mysteries to memoirs, classics to chick lit, busy readers are sure to find plenty of picks to add to their shelves. On this week's show, Kristin lives through a summer of anticipation and loss with a struggling teen writer in Brief Chronicle of Another Stupid Heartbreak by Adi Alsaid.

To read the full review, visit NightsAndWeekends.com.

Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow (Series)

Produced by Phil Mariage

Most recent piece in this series:

Antisemitism - A Generational Discussion

From Phil Mariage | Part of the Yesterday, Today & Tomorrow series | 51:56

Ytt-300x300_small

85 year old Phil Kaplan along with middle generaton Rabbi Barry Block and college student Hanna Liebermann take on antisemitism in a way that stands up to the menace to our society. Not only can we apply their thoughts to the religious aspect, we can see the connection to other us and them issues such as immigration and racial tensions.
This is perhaps one of very few discussions that compare generational thought. In our current times of strife, their thoughts pull no punches in the dangers associated with antisemtic actions and philosophy. Your audience will be moved by their comments and courage.

Fugitive Waves (Series)

Produced by The Kitchen Sisters

Most recent piece in this series:

WILLIAM FERRIS – KEEPER OF SOUTHERN FOLKLIFE

From The Kitchen Sisters | Part of the Fugitive Waves series | 32:00

Ks_fugitivewavessm_small Folklorist and Professor Bill Ferris, a Grammy nominee this year for his "Voices of Mississippi" 3 CD Box set, has committed his life to documenting and expanding the study of the American South. His recordings, photos and films of preachers, quilt makers, blues musicians and more are now online as part of the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina. Bill Ferris grew up on a farm in Warren County, Mississippi along the Black River. His family, the only white family on the farm, worked side by side with the African Americans in the fields. When he was five, a woman named Mary Gordon would take him every first Sunday to Rose Hill Church, the small African American church on the farm. When Bill was a teenager he got a reel-to-reel tape recorder and started recording the hymns and services. “ I realized that the beautiful hymns were sung from memory—there were no hymnals in the church—and that when those families were no longer there, the hymns would simply disappear.” These recordings led Bill to a lifetime of documenting the world around him—preachers, workers, storytellers, men in prison, quilt makers, the blues musicians living near his home (including the soon-to-be well known Mississippi Fred McDowell). Bill became a prolific author, folklorist, filmmaker, professor, and served as chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities. He is a professor of history at UNC–Chapel Hill and an adjunct professor in the Curriculum in Folklore. He served as the founding director of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture at the University of Mississippi, where he was a faculty member for 18 years. He is associate director of the Center for the Study of the American South. Bill’s has written and edited 10 books and created 15 documentary films, most dealing with African-American music and other folklore representing the Mississippi Delta. His thousands of photographs, films, audio interviews, and recordings of musicians are now online in the William R. Ferris Collection, part of the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina. This story was produced by Barrett Golding with The Kitchen Sisters for The Keepers series.

99% Invisible (Standard Length) (Series)

Produced by Roman Mars

Most recent piece in this series:

99% Invisible #170- Children of the Magenta (Standard 4:30 version)

From Roman Mars | Part of the 99% Invisible (Standard Length) series | 04:30

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On the evening of May 31, 2009, 216 passengers, three pilots, and nine flight attendants boarded an Airbus 330 in Rio de Janeiro. This flight, Air France 447, was headed across the Atlantic to Paris. The take-off was unremarkable. The plane reached a cruising altitude of 35,000 feet. The passengers read and watched movies and slept. Everything proceeded normally for several hours. Then, with no communication to the ground or air traffic control, flight 447 suddenly disappeared.

 

Days later, several bodies and some pieces of the plane were found floating in the Atlantic Ocean. But it would be two more years before most of the wreckage was recovered from the ocean’s depths. All 228 people on board had died. The cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorders, however, were intact, and these recordings told a story about how Flight 447 ended up in the bottom of the Atlantic.

The story they told was was about what happened when the automated system flying the plane suddenly shut off, and the pilots were left surprised, confused, and ultimately unable to fly their own plane.

earlyautopilot2[Early Autopilot. Credit: Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution]

The first so called “auto-pilot” was invented by the Sperry Corporation in 1912. It allowed the plane to fly straight and level without the pilot’s intervention. In the 1950s the autopilots improved, and could be programed to follow a route.

By the 1970s, even complex electrical systems and hydraulic systems were automated, and studies were showing that most accidents were caused not by mechanical error, but by human error. These findings prompted the French company Airbus to develop safer planes that used even more advanced automation.

Airbus set out to design what they hoped would be the safest plane yet—a plane that even the worst pilots could fly with ease. Bernard Ziegler, senior vice president for engineering at Airbus, famously said that he was building an airplane that even his concierge would be able to fly.

Airbus_A300_B2_Zero-G[One of the first Airbus planes for commercial use. Credit: Stahlkocher.]

Not only did Ziegler’s plane have auto-pilot, it also had what’s called a “fly-by-wire” system. Whereas autopilot just does what a pilot tells it to do, fly-by-wire is a computer-based control system that can interpret what the pilot wants to do, and then execute the command smoothly and safely. For example, if the pilot pulls back on his or her control stick, the fly-by-wire system will understand that the pilot wants to pitch the plane up, and then will do it at the just the right angle and rate.

Importantly, the fly-by-wire system will also protect the plane from getting into an “aerodynamic stall.” In a plane, stalling can happen when the nose of the plane is pitched up at too steep an angle. This can cause the plane to lose “lift” and start to descend.

stall[From top: a plane in normal flight; a plane in a stall. Credit: Wikipedia Commons.]

Stalling in a plane can be dangerous, but fly-by-wire automation makes it impossible to do. As long as it’s on.

Unlike autopilot, the “fly-by-wire” system cannot be turned on and off by the pilot. However, it can turn itself off. And that’s exactly what it did on May 31, 2009, as Air France Flight 447 made its transatlantic flight.

planned route[The dotted line begins where Flight 447’s last contact with the control tower was made. Credit: Mysid]

When a pressure probe on the outside of the plane iced over, the automation could no longer tell how fast the plane was going, and the autopilot disengaged. The “fly-by-wire” system also switched into a mode in which it was no longer offering protections against aerodynamic stall. When the autopilot disengaged, the co-pilot in the right seat put his hand on the control stick—a little joy stick like thing to his right—and pulled it back, pitching the nose of the plane up.

This action caused the plane to go into a stall, and yet, even as the stall warning sounded, none of the pilots could figure out what was happening to them. If they’d realized they were in a stall, the fix would have been clear. “The recovery would have required them to put the nose down, get it below the horizon, regain a flying speed and then pull out of the ensuing dive,” says William Langewiesche, a journalist and former pilot who wrote about the crash of Flight 447 for Vanity Fair. 

The pilots, however, never tried to recover, because they never seemed to realize they were in a stall.  Four minutes and twenty seconds after the incident began, the plane pancaked into the Atlantic, instantly killing all 228 people on board.

 

There are various factors that contributed to the crash of flight 447. Some people point to the fact that the airbus control sticks do not move in unison, so the pilot in the left seat would not have felt the pilot in the right seat pull back on his stick, the maneuver that ultimately pitched the plane into a dangerous angle. But even if you concede this potential design flaw, it still begs the question, how could the pilots have a computer yelling ‘stall’ at them, and not realize they were in a stall?

It’s clear that automation played a role in this accident, though there is some disagreement about what kind of role it played. Maybe it was a badly designed system that confused the pilots, or maybe years of depending on automation had left the pilots unprepared to take over the controls.

“For however much automation has helped the airline passenger by increasing safety it has had some negative consequences,” says Langewiesche. “In this case it’s quite clear that these pilots had had experience stripped away from them for years.” The Captain of the Air France flight had logged 346 hours of flying over the past six months. But within those six months, there were only about four hours in which he was actually in control of an airplane—just the take-offs and landings. The rest of the time, auto-pilot was flying the plane. Langewiesche believes this lack experience left the pilots unprepared to do their jobs.

Voo_Air_France_447-2006-06-14[Pieces of the wreckage of Flight 447. Credit: Roberto Maltchik]

Complex and confusing automated systems may also have contributed to the crash. When one of the co-pilots hauled back on his stick, he pitched the plane into an angle that eventually caused the stall. But it’s possible that he didn’t understand that he was now flying in a different mode, one which would not regulate and smooth out his movements. This confusion about what how the fly-by-wire system responds in different modes is referred to, aptly, as “mode confusion,”  and it has come up in other accidents.

“A lot of what’s happening is hidden from view from the pilots,” says Langewiesche. “It’s buried. When the airplane starts doing something that is unexpected and the pilot says ‘hey, what’s it doing now?’ — that’s a very very standard comment in cockpits today.'”

Langewiesche isn’t the only person to point out that ‘What’s it doing now?’ is a commonly heard question in the cockpit.

In 1997,  American Airlines captain Warren Van Der Burgh said that the industry has turned pilots into “Children of the Magenta” who are too dependent on the guiding magenta-colored lines on their screens.

William Langewiesche agrees:

“We appear to be locked into a cycle in which automation begets the erosion of skills or the lack of skills in the first place and this then begets more automation.”

However potentially dangerous it may be to rely too heavily on automation, no one is advocating getting rid of it entirely. It’s agreed upon across the board that automation has made airline travel safer. The accident rate for air travel is very low: about 2.8 accidents for every one million departures. (Airbus planes, by the way, are no more or less safe than their main rival, Boeing.)

Langewiesche thinks that we are ultimately heading toward pilotless planes. And by the time that happens, the automation will be so good and so reliable that humans, with all of their fallibility, will really just be in the way.

Screen Shot 2015-06-22 at 11.54.13 AM[The magenta guiding lines of automation, from a 1997 presentation by pilot Warren Van Der Burgh.]

Producer Katie Mingle spoke with William Langewiesche, a former pilot who wrote an article in Vanity Fair about this flight, as well as Nadine Sarter, a systems engineer at the University of Michigan. This episode also features the voice of Captain Warren Van Der Burgh.

Paul Messing's Audio Producer's Grab Bag (Series)

Produced by Paul Messing

Most recent piece in this series:

Orchestral Fanfare :30

From Paul Messing | Part of the Paul Messing's Audio Producer's Grab Bag series | :32

Orchestra_prx_240_small A classic fanfare, orchestral in nature. Thirty seconds, and a great interstitial element between spoken word pieces.

The Sundilla Radio Hour (Series)

Produced by Sundilla

Most recent piece in this series:

The Sundilla Radio Hour #317

From Sundilla | Part of the The Sundilla Radio Hour series | 59:00

Dsc_0704-150x150_medium_small The Sundilla Radio Hour for the week of 05/13/2019 previewing the inaugural Opelika Songwriters Festival happening in Alabama Memorial Day weekend.

Rockin' in the Days of Confusion (Series)

Produced by Stephen R Webb

Most recent piece in this series:

DC 1921

From Stephen R Webb | Part of the Rockin' in the Days of Confusion series | 59:00

Playing
DC 1921
From
Stephen R Webb

Layla_small This week the music flows freely, from one of the greatest "guitar" albums ever made (Robin Trower's Bridge Of Sighs) to a classic Doobie Brothers track, with all kinds of good stuff in between. See http://thehermitrambles.blogspot.com/ for complete playlist.

A Moment of Science (Series)

Produced by WFIU

Most recent piece in this series:

AMOS 19.125: Blow Drier Flier, 6/24/2019

From WFIU | Part of the A Moment of Science series | 02:00

Mos-fullcolor-rgb-stacked_small Blow Drier Flier

Ken Rudin's Political Junkie (Series)

Produced by Ken Rudin's Political Junkie

Most recent piece in this series:

277: Political Junkie Full-Hour Show #277, 5/17/2019

From Ken Rudin's Political Junkie | Part of the Ken Rudin's Political Junkie series | 53:58

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Alabama's new law essentially banning all abortions, with no exceptions for rape or incest, is designed to force the issue to the Supreme Court.  Mary Ziegler of the Florida State University of Law explains that it's a major step on the way for the Court to overturn the Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion from 1973.

 
Nathan Gonzales of Inside Elections dissects the battle for the Senate in 2020, when 22 of the 34 seats at stake are currently held by Republicans.  Democrats, who trail 53-47 in the Senate, are further hampered by the fact that several of the top people on their wish list are not running.


What happens when you have 22 presidential candidates and only a maximum of 20 can participate in next month's Democratic debate?  Maggie Astor of the New York Times sets out the criteria for the candidates and which ones have made the cut thus far.


And we remember the Supreme Court decision of 1954 -- 65 years ago this week -- that outlawed school segregation in the famed Brown v. Board of Education case.  Rogers Smithof the University of Pennsylvania talks about the case's legacy.

Imaginary Worlds (Series)

Produced by Eric Molinsky

Most recent piece in this series:

Sidekicks: Tonto and Kato

From Eric Molinsky | Part of the Imaginary Worlds series | 29:12

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In part two of our mini series on sidekicks, we look at two characters that have travelled in parallel since they came out of the same radio station in the 1930s – Tonto and Kato. There wasn’t anything authentically Native American or Asian about these sidekicks, but that didn’t matter to the audiences who enjoyed their team-ups with The Lone Ranger and The Green Hornet. Embodying Tonto and Kato was a lot more challenging for the actors Jay Silverheels and Bruce Lee, who struggled to find humanity within the stereotypes and respect behind the scenes. Featuring Dustin Tahmahkera of the University of Illinois, Chadwick Allen of the University of Washington, Daryl Maeda of the University of Colorado at Boulder, Zig Misiak author of “Tonto: The Man in Front of the Mask”, and Matthew Polly author of “Bruce Lee: A Life.”